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The 
Davidson 

Experience 

Volume 84 



ontent 



A Opening 



1981 saw the initiation of the 
Davidson College Commons. 
After ousting A ft A Slater. 
Davidson boldly decided to 
operate their own dining service. 



Academics When classes get boring, Claire 

Abernathy, Janet Stovall, and 
Mark Morrison find other ways to 
occupy their minds. 



40 Faculty, Staff, 
Administration 



A grounds crew member starts 
work early, rolling the tennis 
courts in preparation for a spring 
day's onslaught of fair weather 
athletes. 




70 Organizations 



9Q Patterson Court 



Visiting lecturers at Davidson 
often spend time in the Union's 
Conversation Pit after their talks. 
Here U.S. Senator Dick Clark, 
Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow, 
sits back with Mandy Barber to 
answer questions. 



Not only does the Commons 
provide service to over 350 
freshmen, but Patterson Court 
"waiting lists" are becoming 
obsolete as more upperclassmer 
decide the Commons satisfies 
their itineraries and their 
stomachs. 

Preceeding Page: Senior English 
major Sally Campbell attends Dr 
Bliss' War Literature seminar 
offered through the Center for 
Special Studies. 




if 



'Opening 



Russ Warren, called one of t, 
most promising young artists in 
America by Art News, stands by 

of his "mythic" paintings in 

. illery's fall exhibit. 



I 




Coach Estock maps game 
strategy for a young offensive 
line which returns nearly intact 
for 1982. 



Charlie Lovett plays the role of_ 
the entertainer as Carole Jolly 
relaxes against the piano during 
the Union's winter "Love Boat 
Cruise, ' ' complete with sand, sun 
lamps, and a hot tub. 



Sports -|g4 



Underclassmen 216 




With a "Mean Joe Green" smile, 
football sensation Ray Sinclair 
recalls the highlights of the 1981 



A prospective Davidson student 
watches the colorful 
commencement procession from 
his father's lap. 

Awards 29a 

Advertisements 29t 

lnde\ 30i 



Seniors 268 



Closing 290 



T 



he Davidson Experience — 



The Davidson 
Experience: 

Is It Just 

A Figment Of 



the Dean of Students' office fairly 
glows with it, pulsating like 
a fluorescent light with a pale, 
greenish tint. In the early 
morning hours it grows strong, 
and seeps cautiously between 
the door and its jambs, rears it 
head, and peers sharply down 
each end of the hall. As the 
coast is clear, one arm extends 
confidently toward the Southwest 
in search of Admissions. Another 
takes the well worn track to the 
sanctuary of alumni relations, 
glibbering all the while with 
excitement at the prospect of 
another day's living endowment. 
Meanwhile, the first arm has 
completed its circuit and 
returned to home base, leaving 
the admissions office newly 
charged and ready to face the 
morning's prospectives with 
cheery smiles and tales of 
freshman mixers. The clock on 
the first floor reads 7:45 — it's 
7:50 on the second — as the 
alumni branch of the D.E. returns 
down the hall, pausing in its 
journey only long enough to 
circle the unwary head of a 
student rushing early to the front 
row of Perkins. Collecting itself in 
front of the door, the Davidson 
Experience turns and knocks. 
The knob begins to turn and the 
door to open, revealing a figure 
which solidifies amidst the aether 
as it advances slowly toward the 
threshold. It is Will Terry, the 
Dean of Students. With a quiver 
of delight the Davidson 
Experience leaps to his breast 
and is held, meeping contentedly 
all the while. 

But what is this eerie scene, 
this thing that cavorts wildly in 
the hallways far beneath the 
chambermaids? What is this 




4 Opening 







Davidson Experience? Does it 
even exist except in the 
imagination? Most students, 
although quite aware that what 
they are living is a singular and 
often harrowing experience, hold 
a conception of the D.E. that is 
nebulous at best. Senior premed 
Ellen Gyauch expresses the 
prevailing sentiment in saying "I 
can't believe that we pay to do 
this. It would be one thing if 



somebody were paying us — I 
mean, the professors get paid. It 
really cracks me up." Senior Dan 
Harkins echoes that thought with 
"I really don't enjoy working all 
that much," when asked why he 
transferred back to Davidson 
after only one year at Oklahoma 
State University. Even so, the 
strong academic program is 
precisely the reason why he 
returned. "OSU was so slack; it 



K/~. 



A familiar scene in Chambers 
102, Dean of Students Will Terry 
administers to hall counselors 
Tom Schember and John 
Mann. Dean since 1970, Will 
took the job over from Richard 
Burts, who now deals solely 
with academic headaches. 

was boring." The controversy 
rages on over the state of 
Davidson academics. Facilities 



Terry's Imagination . . . 



Opening 5 















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are often not all they should be; 
one biology major claims, "If I 
had it do over again, I'd come 
back as philosophy major." 

One often hears the complaint 
that the "students are passive," 
in spite of a high level of 
academic ability. Dean of 
Students Will Terry feels that a 
vital part of college experience 
lies in "the exposure to new 
ideas, new thoughts, new 



feelings." But he observes that 
this is not as much a part of the 
Davidson Experience as it has 
been in years past. Dean Terry 
recognizes a need to challenge 
views which seem to be strongly 
entrenched in students before 
they even enter college, 
traditionally a time of questioning 
old values. To this end, the 1982 
school year saw the 
implementation of the faculty's 



Task Force on Global Arrairs, a 
committee intended to enhance 
students' understanding of world 
issues. Dan Harkins attributes 
the attitude not to the school, 
but to "the mood, the generation 
we grew up in." He feels that, 
when one looks at the general 
picture of education in this 
country, "Davidson does a 
reasonably good job of sticking 
to its philosophy." 



. . . Or Does It Really 



6 Opening 



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And what is this philosophy? 
Perhaps it is here, in a 
philosophy shared to some 
extent by all members of the 
Davidson community, that the 
Davidson Experience lies. Into 
any community, no matter how 
small, differences of opinion 
invariably enter. Catering to all 
the needs of even one individual 
becomes impossible. On the one 
hand, Dan Harkins enjoys the 



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fact that "at Davidson they 
expect you to be more 
responsible," but in the same 
breath laments the fact that 
sometimes "they treat us like 
little kids." Comments Dean 
Terry, "I think a lot of agony 
goes on around here." Perhaps 
Melis Nicolaides' approach 
strikes a viable note. "It's easy 
for someone to hate Davidson. 
It's up to you to like it."H 



Davidson College enjoys a 
constant cycle of renovation. The 
Martin Science building (opposite) 
received a facelift in 1979. Once 
destroyed by fire. Chambers now 
affords a view (top) which in dry 
weather includes traces of the 
original foundations. DC PC 
(above left) has undergone little 
change, but this year saw an 
entirely new location for Bailey 
(above right) and Richards Houses. 



Exist? 



Opening 7 



o 



ne hundred three gallons of ice cream. That's 2,575 scoops, give or take a few, enough scoops 

to span almost two football fields 
(178.81 yards of scoops). Stack 
them up, and the Washington 
Monument would win but only by 
about ten feet (536.43 feet of 
scoops). Even Evel Knievel 
couldn't jump all that ice cream 
(2,575 scoops equals 67 bus 
widths), but Davidson students, 
in an average week, make short 
work of that 103 gallons of ice 
cream. 

To satisfy this considerable 
craving, students flock to area 
eateries. Murray Fleming, of the 
M & M Soda Shop, estimates 
that Davidson students consume 
90 percent of the 30 to 50 





gallons of ice cream he sells 
each week, mostly in the form of 
milkshakes. And at the Buttery 
and Beanery, students satisfy 
their cravings in the form of over 
200 cones, 125 milkshakes, and 
50 ice cream sundaes every 
week. 

Ice cream opportunities also 
abound on campus. The Union 
Cafe sells about 24 gallons a 
week, and the Commons serves 
it up free several times each 
month. 

Patterson Court also provides 
its share of the frozen delight. 
"Ice Cream Socials", open to 
the entire campus, are favorite 
traditions at both Emanon and 



ATO. At ATO, however, nuts, 
cherries, hot fudge, and whipped 
cream are considered mild fare; 
rumor has it that bird seed, 
bacon bits, and even half-frozen 
beef stew have appeared as 
toppings as part of their socials. 
There is no accounting for 
tastes, it seems. 

No matter what the flavor or 
combination, Davidson students 
do like their ice cream. Senior 
Richard Strader thinks "ice 
cream relaxes a person because 
you can't eat it fast or else you 
get a headache." Lanny Smith, 
a freshman, went more for a gut 
response. "I eat ice cream 
'cause I'm a pig." ■ 



From the topping grasped by 
Union leader Shaw Smith 
(opposite page left) to the final 
product held by Dennard Lindsey 
(middle page top), we try to 
satisfy our needs for ice cream. 
Freshmen Tony Holt and 
Rebecca Bates (middle left and 
right) are almost there. Finally 
Greg Thompson succeeds as he 
licks his chocolaty finger while 
Todd Thompson gets ready for 
that first taste of a sundae made 
by Ann Parker (below). 




s 



leep, by tradition, is a nocturnal function — the sun sets and so does the body. Not so at 
Davidson College. Papers, reviews, and parties have little 
respect for the setting of the sun; consequently the rigors of 
academia often unite to displace sleep from its normal time slot. A 
student's biological rhythms can get as out of sync as the clocks 
in Chambers. "When I'm on break I see my parents in the 
afternoons," explains one senior, too long under the influence of 
that peculiar entity called Davidson time. "We take a meal 
together but call it by different names. I guess I should be glad 
our schedules overlap as much as they do." 

Although many students, especially freshmen, cling to a regular 
bedtime as a matter of self-preservation, others have come to a 
truly aesthetic understanding of the act. Junior Drew Davis has 
become quite a permanent fixture down at PAX. I've made it into 
an art form," he says. "Sleep is like a lot of other things, in that 
people ought to be more willing to break with normal societal 
standards in order to enrich themselves." Generally shunning his 
room in Sentelle, Drew often sleeps at PAX, but enjoys varying his 
routine from day to day. Favorite haunts include ATO and Perkins 




auditorium, but Varney Houston's tombstone in the cemetery tops 
the list. Drew claims to have spent a most enjoyable Halloween in 
that secluded spot, asleep and unmolested. 

For some reason, the academic environment inspires an urge to 
slumber against which few students win out. A consensus has 
never been reached as regards a cure for this affliction — 
although the No-Doze school has many enthusiastic supporters — 
but the cause is uncontested. As Will Berson puts it, "I never 
have to sleep unless it's time to go to class or read a book." 
Hazards to the GPA are obvious, especially in 8:00 classes and 
most especially in 8:00 classes with films. During mid-terms and 
around exams the library becomes a veritable obstacle course, 
bodies draped over carrels and strewn between the stacks. And 
as freshman Charlie Tiches has discovered, even a highlighter can 
become a dangerous weapon when the hand that holds it begins 
to droop. When queried about the yellow tracks down the front of 
his shirt, Charlie replies, "You should see my sheets!" Sleep — 
boon or bane? You can't pass with it and you can't pass without 
it ■ 



(Counterclockwise from upper 
left) Perhaps chasing cars 
is the cause of the dog's tired 
pose, but the rigors of academic 
pursuits appear to be equally 
draining. Where one sleeps 
doesn't seem to matter. Lisa 
Brawley finds rest in the 
basement of Chambers whereas 
Russ Summerell dozes in the 
library. Malcolm Campbell even 
sleeps in his room. In a pinch 
any place will do, as is shown 
by the unidentified student who 
crashes by the government 
documents. The serene faces on 
the girls of Third Rich seem to 
show that sleeping with friends 
is the best rest of all. 





Library the social center on campus? Only Davidson's E.H. 
Little Library, known 
simply as the "braire" by those 
who frequent its stacks, offers 
something for everyone — 
studier and non-studier alike! 

There is a very definite 
relationship between where you 
sit and how much work you do 
(or do not) get done. While hard 
core students can seek refuge in 
the Davidsoniana Room or in 
secluded carrels in the twenty- 
four hour study room, 
everywhere else it is open 
season for socializing. 

One organized social club 
holds regular meetings on the 
second floor. The Library Club, 
mostly sophomore Pikes, has 
leased carrel space among the 
830.8H section. Freshman Beth 



Maczka, the club's mascot and 
social advisor explains, "This is 
strictly sophomore Pikes, except 
for Mark Morrison. I just make 
request apearances." 

Other groups, such as the 
football players, meet on a more 
informal basis. When not 
practicing or entertaining 
themselves elsewhere, these 
athletes congregate in the 
basement. Their main activity 
seems to be attracting freshman 
girls, but word has it that some 
studying is done. "Babes" reads 
ten pages an hour. 



12 Opening 




Another hub of activity is the 
circulation desk and surrounding 
area. Even the most stubborn of 
non-library types is eventually 
forced to succumb to reserve 
reading. "The all time favorite," 
according to desk worker Linus 
Whitlock, "is Humes reading — 
especially first year." Psychology 
and sociology professors are 
infamous for their extensive use 
of reserved readings. Linus 
reports that "the fight comes the 
night before a test when there 
are only one or two copies." 

Times like these force the 



Xerox machine into overtime. 
Mrs. Fogelman, who keeps track 
of such things, reports that over 
240,000 copies of tests, papers, 
and class notes roll off the 
library Xerox each year. During 
exam time desk workers become 
regular bank tellers. 

In the basement, C. Shaw 
Smith III has diligently worked on 
his graduate dissertation 35 
hours a week since August 1981, 
a model to all. "Even though it's 
nice," says Shaw, "I hope I 
won't be here forever." These 
are our sentiments exactly. ■ 



As Wilson Lowrey and Ross 
Hunter demonstrate, the library 
serves the function of a social 
center (top left). Where else 
could Martin Valbuena and 
Warren Lackey climb atop a 
stack to read? Putting their 
books down, a group of friends 
discuss this weekend's plans 
(center). Even on the floor, 
Frazier Worth (above top) 
spends many hours hitting those 
books. These bizarre study 
habits contrast with that friendly 
but formal indoctrination given 
by Dr. Beaty (above). 



trong academics — that is s 



NAA \>" 





the number one reason students apply to Davidson." says 
Admissions counselor Dick Jones. 

But is Davidson really a strong academic institution and do 
Davidson students strive for academic excellence? Some are not 
so certain. "We are not encouraging ourselves or each other to 
become responsible thinkers." says senior John Hartman. "The 
Davidson community is more interested in finding spots for next 
week's tests than in the morality of the draft or ERA." 

Having experienced academic life elsewhere, senior Marie Cefalo 
sees that here as "far superior." "The professors are devoted to 
academic, intellectual pursuits and the students are very receptive 
to what the faculty has to share." She continues. "It is a give and 
take relationship which I find unique and stimulating." 

There is definitely a conflict between those who merely "want to 
make a grade" and those who really want to learn. T.C. Price 
Zimmerman. Dean of Academic Affairs, recognizes the fact that 
Davidson students are very career oriented but he hopes that 
"while they are here preparing for a career that students will come 
to broaden their view of the world around them and to view 
learning as an end and a reward in itself. Goals determine the way 
in which we work." he continues, "and if one's sole ambition is to 
tmake an A or B + then learning becomes a process rather than 
lan end." 

Senior Danny Armistead encourages Davidson students to make 
i learning an end in itself: "The resources and possibilities here are 
i incredible; to pass up taking advantage of them is a real mistake. 



Jeff Mann, an experienced 
Humes student, takes notes 
through osmosis (far left). With 
opened eyes, Alex Nelson types 
his program (center). Whether 
taking a test or working in 
organic lab, Amy Ashworth and 
Marshall Dent seriously 
concentrate on their work 
(bottom left and right). Years of 
concentration didn't even help 
Professors Nelson, Yoder and 
Ortmeyer (below) as they lose a 
College Bowl match. 




Academics 15 



Study Spot? 
— Don't Tell 



The dorm is too noisy, the library too 
crowded, and as tomorrow's "review" 
grows ever closer the need for a good 
study spot is suddenly the issue of the 
evening. Procrastination becomes a 
thing of the past. With everything yet to 
do and nothing done, you're looking for 
silence and solitude. But where? 

"The elevator in Chambers," says 
David Snyder, a freshman. Preferring 
that to the elevator in the Union, David 
says he gets a lot done. "It's nice and 
quiet, but it has its ups and downs." 
Thanks, Dave. 

Love Auditorium, too, seems to be 
growing in popularity as a quiet refuge 
for study. A dim light shines on the 
stage of the otherwise dark room, 
providing a comfortable atmosphere for 
work. 

Other favorites are the east balcony 
of the Commons, the ever popular "fish 
bowl" (that's "Chem Lab" to the rest 
of us), and even the Guest House, 
despite the admonitions of its manager, 
Mrs. French. 

Freshman Meg Surratt, after careful 
consideration, has come up with three 
study spots that she refers to as the 
Perch, the Porch, and the Stairwell. 
Probably the most organized selection 
yet. 

The Perch is a small balcony outside 
Meg's hall window that lets her "watch 
the people go by" while she studies. 
Rumor has it that a Humes paper was 
typed on the ledge late one night — 

The Porch is a reference to the stone 
slabs on either side of the Union steps. 
This is the preferred spot "in warm or 
cool weather." The Union's outside 
lights also let Meg study right on 
through the night. 

Finally, the top of the library's back 
stairwell, equipped with a single chair 
and footstool, is practically unknown to 
everyone else and — surprisingly 
enough — very quiet, unlike most of 
the other places in the library. 

Refusing to be limited by traditional 
habits, students can be found studying 
almost anywhere. Uniqueness and 
creativity are bywords of Davidson, and 
its students constantly find new ways of 
proving it. ■ 




If sheer numbers give any indication, 
Humanities must be the single most 
popular course at Davidson. This year 
126 students enrolled in the two-year 
program. (Above) Keg Carter, Mandy 
Dot son, Annie Porges, and Martha 
Nelson become truly initiated. Martha's 
paper is the first of 1956 which will 
exchange hands in the next two years. 
At right, first-year students attend 
lecture in Perkins Auditorium. By their 
second year, Mandy Barber and 
Anderson Scott, (far right) ascend the 
three flights of stairs automatically. Fran 
Gibson (top right), reads a staple of the 
program. Course books, which run as 
much as $356.20 over a two-year 
period, can run a student into the red. 




16 Academics 



|5* TT IT 




Humanities program continues to increase in ularity 



Academics 17 




Area I presents diverse course offerings 

18 Academics 




Independent research is a crucial 
part of every college professor's 
struggle to survive Research also 
represents to the students how much 
a professor respects and enjoys his 
or her subiect. Herb Jackson (top 
left), is one of Davidson's artists-m- 
residence. Here Herb suggests 
possible changes to Carol Impara. a 
member of Advanced Painting 
Having spent the summer 
concertizing in Hong Kong. Professor 
William Lawing (bottom center), can 
better clarify the finer points of 
conducting. Linda Cruciani and 
Barbara Kelley (bottom left), go over 



notes from English Colloquium in an 
attempt to pass comprehensives 
Thurston Hatcher (top center), 
concentrates on foreign language 
tapes before a review All the 
studying and lectures come together 
tor Eric Sanner (left), as he prepares 
his own talk for art history class 
Professors Mark Davies and Cynthia 
Lewis (below), spend summers 
studying their specialities, ancient 
Greek and Elizabethan and 
Restoration drama. Students and 
professors constantly interact in lively 
and informative discussions. 




Academics 19 




New acquisitions beef up math, biology departments 



20 Academics 





Davidson College, welcome to the 
modern age! This year the school 
acquired two Prime computers. The 
first, a Prime 450, is marked for 
administrative use; the second, a Prime 
750, for academic use. During its first 
two weeks in operation the system 
recorded 1300 logins, attesting to its 
rapid acceptance by the college 
community. Students (top center), may 
use one of 32 video terminals scattered 
throughout the campus, and may speak 
to the 750 in several computer 
languages, including BASIC, FORTRAN, 
COBOL, and PASCAL. The system also 
offers a statistical package and word 
processing capabilities. Demand for the 
computer facilities has been sufficient 
to ruffle a few feathers near exam time, 
as students avail themselves of the 
computer's programs for editing and 
printing out term papers. For those who 



can't wait in line, Dr. Bernard (top left) 
reminds Rod Holman that sometimes a 
pencil and paper will suffice. 

The biology department, as well, 
benefited from new equipment this 
year. A rather large, anonymous 
donation enabled the department to 
purchase new microscopes. Rumor has 
it that the old scopes have joined the 
passenger pigeons in Dr. Putnam's 
museum. From far left, students explore 
biology beyond the classroom. Claire 
Groves and Betsy Johnson dissect a 
crayfish; Keith Martin uses one of the 
new scopes; and Dr. Lammers points 
out some local flora. The physics and 
chemistry departments (above), made 
do with the same old equipment. Brian 
Brost and Thomas Grimes (top) 
complete a Physics 36 lab. as Ron 
Emerson reads over a chem lab. 



Academics 21 







EPC Slips One Over: 
New P.E. Requirements 

By scanning the course selection sheets, Ruthie Farrior, above, tries to choose 
just three suitable classes for the upcoming term. But who or what powerful force 
controls Ruthie's selection of courses? The Educational Policies Committee, led by 
the invincible Darth Vadar of Davidson accademia, T.C. Price Zimmerman, worked 
to make several changes in courses and grading that sent students and professors 
into an uproar. Early in 1982 the Committee debated whether to close the Center 
for Special Studies in order to strengthen the Departmental Majors. According to 
Zimmerman, the faculty questioned if faculty members could work at the Center 
without weakening their work with majors in their own departments. About 200 
students and professors signed petitions protesting this move, and soon 
afterwards the Committee dropped this proposal. 

In the spring the Committee made two proposals, one of which escaped the 
student body's interest. A decision to change the P.E. requirements came late in 
the spring when students were occupied with other concerns. In sharp contrast to 
this announcement, the EPC raised the issue of a change in the grading system. 
Under the EPC proposal letter grades would have been dropped and replaced by 
a 4.0 point system. Proponents of the new scale felt this change would enable 
professors to make finer distinctions in grading their students and eliminate the 
need to convert letter grades to the 4.0 point scale in order to determine GPA's. 
Student reaction was largely negative. Fear of increased competition for grades 
prompted 450 students to sign an SGA petition opposing any changes in the 
grading system. Finally, after long consideration and debate by the Committee, 
the faculty voted down the proposal by a 2:1 margin. The faculty and students 
were successful twice in defeating the EPC's proposals. The Center remains open, 
and the grading system unchanged. However, the EPC's constant attempts to 
alter perhaps antiquated Davidson "institutions" serves as a reminder that 
changes will eventually come to even a school steadfastly committed to tradition. 




"God and man at Davidson College. 
Both are here. " That they are here is 
clearly exemplified in the course 
requirements: every student must take 
three religion and philosophy courses. 
In fulfilling this requirement, students 
encounter professors from two of 
Davidson's strongest departments. 
Professor Maioney (top), brings his 
theological knowledge to a discussion 



22 Academics 




of Cervantes with Humanities students 
Joe Calvin and Julie Cheek. 
Emphatically demonstrating his point, 
Scott Campbell (above), questions 
Professor Mele after philosophy class. 
Kirsten McDonald (right), stops taking 
notes to ponder the results of anti- 
semitism in Professor Polley's 
Holocaust seminar. 



Students flood religion courses in attempts to fulfil! area requirements 

Academics 23 



Even lower-level courses fill easily in the 
Social Sciences Department. Professors 
Shi and Partin, (right and bottom 
center), literally teach and entertain 
history students for an hour a day. With 
the same success, Professor Clark Ross 
(below), establishes an easy-going 
rapport with economics followers Cindy 
Chavez, Mike Cooper and Mark Murrey. 
Lund Easterling (top right), pauses to 
grimace at a fellow classmate during 
Professor Thompson's economics class. 
Commented one timid participant in 
Experimental Psychology (bottom right), 
"Think I like pushing this stupid bar all 
day long?" Rats and students, 
however, managed to enjoy a fairly 
successful term with only minor 
casualities reported. 





1 #^N:- 



Social sciences continue in popularity 



24 Academics 



I* +X. 




Academics 25 




The Center for Special Studies caters 
to a small group of students who 
wish to study in-depth topics not 
usually associated with a major 
department. Senior Lisa Brawley 
(above), discusses her thoughts 
about cognition and knowledge with 
her advisor Professor Brockway. 
Diane Downing and Patty Bates 
(above right and opposite), enjoy the 



quiet and solitude of the Center to 
work on their senior theses, genetics 
and health care for the elderly 
respectively. The Center also 
provides a place for weekly lunches 
and lectures for small groups. Mitch 
Mitchell, right, listens to one such 
lecture given by Biology Professor 
Williamson. 



Reality Reaches Through 
Davidson's Glass Dome 



With President Reagan's cuts in 
federal college programs, students 
around the country faced even more 
problems in funding their college 
educations. Reagan's plans include 
loans, grants, and work-study 
programs, many of which will suffer 
extreme cutbacks or total extinction. 
Over 40 percent of the Davidson 
student body currently receives some 
type of financial assistance. As a 
result, Reagan's budget cuts would 
certainly alter college life. According 
to Associate Director of Financial Aid 



26 Academics 




Center for Special Studies survives another threatened shutdown 



Kathleen Stevenson, Davidson would 
need an extra $840,000 over the 
next two fiscal years in order to 
compensate for these cuts. 

These financial aid reductions will 
force many students to find additional 
resources or even to leave campus. 
Many of the students who receive aid 
from Davidson have work-study jobs. 
Reagan's budget calls for a 27 percent 
funding cut in the work-study program, 



a move which could thus knock 
approximately 14 percent of the 
student body out of their jobs. The 
Commons and other private eating 
establishments such as Peregrine 
House, Gus's and B and B offer 
students the opportunity to work 
regardless of their financial status. 
These institutions, however, cannot 
handle the number of students who 
need money to finance their education. 



Students are basically left with 
several options. They can take a year 
off to work and earn money for school, 
or they can leave private institutions to 
attend their state or public schools. 
Hopefully the move to public schools 
will not usurp Davidson of many 
students. Yet. faced with the difficulties 
produced by Reagan's cuts, students 
may unfortunately find themselves 
making such moves. ■ 



Academics 27 



ROTC's year started last summer with 
standout performances by seniors Ellen 
Gyauch, Jeff Wright and John Shaw at 
Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The drills 
continue through the year as Albert 
Potter (center), and another gunman 
(top right), demonstrate. Also on the 
ground the cadets (bottom center), 
practice leg lifts under the supervision 
of Eddie Beeker. Russ Snipes (bottom 
right), takes a break from the action 
during a weekend training excursion. 
With the help of the American Red 
Cross, ROTC collected 299 pints of 
blood, one of which came from the arm 
of smiling Kelly Sundberg (right). All 
the hard work paid off for Billy Price as 
he was commissioned by his parents, 
General and Mrs. Price (below). 




Davidson cadets tops in Carolinas at Fort Bragg training camp 



28 Academics 




Academics 29 




New P.E. requirements to relieve senior rush in registrar's office 



30 Academics 






By spring term this year, approximately 
190 seniors had not filled those 
dreaded P.E. requirements. The 
department gives its all. allowing 
students to fulfill requirements in a wide 
variety of sports. David Short (far left), 
rappels down the ROTC tower to 
capture an individual credit. Some 
students elect to teach. Connie Terry 
and Bob Bowden (top), offered a 
popular lacrosse course. Thomas Bates 
and Marc Fields (left), put their moves 
into action as they spike one down 
their opponents' throat, while an 
airborne Willie David crashes down to 
mat in the hands of karate partner Billy 
Sullivan (above). The class of '86. 
however, will see many fewer seniors i 
sweats, as new rules dictate the 
requirements be filled by the begi 
of junior year. 



Academics 31 



Life "A.D.": Is There 
A Job In Your Future? 

In an effort to become more aware of student needs and reactions to the 
current job placement programs, the Dean of Students' office sent out a 
questionnaire to each graduating senior, asking for comments on the various 
services provided by the Office of Experiential Programs and Lifework Planning. 
One such offering is the career workshop taught by Ken Wood (below). 

Only 147 seniors responded to the questionnaire. Of these, roughly 53% were 
in the market for jobs, but less than half of that number registered with the 
Careers Office. Many students seized the opportunity to interview with companies 
on campus, such as Proctor and Gamble, First Union, Xerox, NCNB, and Guest 
Quarters, but many also expressed a desire to see other institutions become 
available. The major airlines, networks, and companies from the northern U.S. 
were cited, as well as agencies with a service rather than a business orientation. 
Several students suggested that the Careers Office create a position for corporate 
recruitment. 

By and large, however, the survey showed that the Careers Office does an 
adequate job of helping seniors find work. To the query, "How can the Careers 
Office communicate better with students?" one senior replied: "I don't think at 
this point that improving communication is the Office's problem. Students need to 
do the improving." If the comments made by the respondents are any indication, 
students appear in many cases to be fairly ignorant of the office's activities. A 
frequent request was made for fliers and calendars; apparently those sent were 
waylaid en route or ignored at their destination. It all boils down to the fact that 
students must begin to take responsibility for their own lives "After Davidson." As 
one senior commented, "Make them realize that Ken Wood is not going to find 
you a job, only give you the opportunities to gain the tools needed, and a chance 
to interview with companies who will come to Davidson." Finding a job is only a 
part of creating a life. Ken Wood knows it; most seniors have to learn the hard 
way. ■ 






32 Academics 




I 



The Office of Experiential Programs 
and Lifework Planning, located in the 
basement of the Union, offers 
students several ways to learn about 
possible careers. Susan Roberts (top 
left), attends a career workshop held 
by Ken Wood. Wood encourages 
students to think about the type of 
career that would be most suitable 
to their personalities and 
expectations. At this same 
workshop, seniors Elliott Stotler, 
Betsy Holton and John Hartman 
(left), listen to each other's ideas 
before deciding what kind of work 
best interests them. Cindy Hendricks 
(above), glances through the files of 
the Experiential Office in hopes of 
locating an internship for a term or a 
possible job. 



Careers Office swamped by increased demand for job placement 



Academics 33 



"What we really learned is how to go 
about doing science. At this point I feel 
like I know what scientists do for a 
living." Frazier Worth's assessment of 
Davidson's one term program at Duke 
University's Marine Laboratory in 
Beaufort sums up the enthusiasm of all 
28 students participating in this year's 
group. The course load focuses on the 
practice and study of the scientific 
method. Students complete an 
independent study on subjects ranging 
from the shell selection of hermit crabs 
to "Daily Fluctuations in the Crystalline 



Style o/llyanassa obsoleta," as well as 
attending seminars and taking either 
Invertebrate Zoology or Biochemistry. 
(Right, top to bottom) Ed Daugherty 
breaks from note taking, while Greg 
Kucera and Caroline Massey work in 
the lab. Students' experiences include 
digging worms in the mud, dredging for 
sponges, and relaxing after hours at 
Cape Lookout and Shackle ford Banks. 
Greg Kucera (far right) and Ricky 
Watson (below) show just a little of the 
spirit which carried the group through 
ten weeks of intense biological study. 





J 







\ 






Twenty-eight students study biology in Beaufort 



34 Academics 









fffrsf row; Ed Daugherty. Greg Kucera. Diggs 
Bishop. Professor Cindy Grant. Mark Gillespy. 
Ricky Watson (second row) Frazier Worth. 
Lisa Sloan. Mary Elizabeth Crantord. Kathy 
Munger. Donna lies. Sue Graves. Julie Powell. 
Bob Bruce. Daniel Ettedgui. Van Wagner. 



Caroline Massey. Carol Hoopes. Will Kendnck 
(third row) Sandy Smith. Craig Rice. Steve 
Shield. Loy Thornton. Beth Been. Paul 
Mainella. Jim Sasser. Jimmy Hawk. Blair 
Maxwell. David Donahower (afloat) Professor 
David Grant. 



Academics 35 



'yJJfF 1 



r 9W fT 







A-i^ K*itifW 



Twelve art history buffs study with Dr. Ligo in France 



36 Academics 





(l-r) Sarah Nock. Margaret Holt. Lisa Robinson. Mebane Atwood. Eileen Benner. Joyce Robinson. 
David Fleming. Margaret Evans. Norwood Smith Not Shown: Stan Hynds. Mark Murrey. John Stipp. 



"To be an obvious American in France 
is not all that enjoyable. " writes junior 
John Stipp to the Davidsonian of his 
eight week stint studying art history. 
But the tradition of the haughty 
Frenchman can be as much of a 
stereotype as the obnoxious American 
tourist, and so the twelve students 
participating in Dr. Ligo's Art History in 
France seminar discovered. The group 
spent several weeks in the Louvre 
alone, as well as venturing out of Paris 
into the French countryside in search of 
examples of medieval architecture. The 
students received rare opportunities to 
explore in detail the cathedral in 
Chartres, as well as other structures. 
Mark Murrey (above), takes a closer 
look at a medieval gateway, as 
compatriots enjoy the view from the 
castle tower (far left). Dr. Ligo 
introduced his students to the local flora 
and fauna as well, including Sir Donkey 
(left). Lisa Robinson (above), gives it 
the old college try, while absorbing a 
little local color. Students also found 
ample time for pure relaxation (top left). 
Margaret Holt and Margaret Evans 
share a rocky perch; Lisa Robinson 
(sans donkey, local color). Professor 
Ligo. and David Fleming rest 
comfortably on a castle wall. 



Academics 37 



The View 

From 

Abroad 



Imagine returning to your apartment 
and discovering that it had been blown 
up by a convict escaping from a 
nearby prison. Imagine sleeping on the 
streets and trains of Europe with a 
band of grungy winos, peasants, or 
migrant workers and being compelled 
to share your bottle of wine with them 
because it was "unspoken tradition." 
Imagine being served the largest 
portion of a cold cow's brain or the 
tongue of a just slaughtered goat 
simply because you were the guest of 
honor. Imagine living in an apartment 
twice as old as the United States or 
visiting still inhabited medieval villages. 

Any member of the Davidson JYA- 
Montpellier group will tell a different 
story of adventure and personal 
maturation. While in France, we 
enhanced our appreciation for the arts, 
other cultures, and diverse ways of 
thought. As we visited Europe, taking 
advantage of historical monuments, 
museums, and the commonfolk was 
fairly easy. In Montpellier we had the 
time to evaluate the microcosms in 
which we participated at home, to 
realign or refine our goals, and to 
analyze our potentials and interests 
without the academic pressures of 
Davidson. The Davidson JYAer found 
more than wine, cheese, bagets, and 
the Riveriera. He discovered also a 
unique sense of freedom, the necessity 
to accept responsibilities, and the 
importance of personal relationships. In 
spite of the cultural gaps, occasional 
homesickness, and the initial 
frustrations, the time we spent in 
France was more than worth it and the 
experience was a blast. ■ 



Without a doubt, the JYA experience 
wreaks a change on those who give 
themselves over to it. It comes in as 
many forms as there are participants, 
and the consensus seems to be one of 
adjustment. One of the easier 
adjustments students undergo is 
culinary. An unidentified crepe maker 
flips away (below), while Laura Terry 
(right) enjoys a few cold ones in 
Montpellier. Students also serve as 
models of American life. Mike Allen 
(below right) teaches a song to a 
mademoiselle, while Marburg resident 
Ron Tunkel (bottom) defends 
democracy abroad. 




38 Academics 




JYA programs remain popular optioi for many 



Academics 39 



MARK I. DAVIES, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of CLASSICS: 

Having received a grant from the National Endowment 
for the Humanities (NEH), Dr. Davies spent this summer at 
UNC — Chapel Hill researching the ancient Greek 
playwright Aristophanes' work "Wasps." Davies gathered 
information to determine the way in which props and 
costumes were used in the play as well as to highlight 
their significance toward a better understanding of the 
script. He plans to use his findings for his contextual 
commentary to "Wasps," which he will publish with 
Princeton University Press in late 1983 or 1984. 



JOHN P. BROCKWAY, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of PSYCHOLOGY: 

Earlier this year, Dr. Brock way presented a paper on his 
theory of human memory to the University of Konstanz in 
West Germany. Brockway's paper dealt with the idea of 
an inferential basis for human memory, and his outlook 
served as the foundation for the Language Use, Meaning 
and Interpretation International Conference. Offering an 
alternative to the more traditional storage/container 
metaphor for human memory, Brockway hopes that his 
new metaphor will allow the psychology of human memory 
to expand. 




Anthony S. Abbott 
Professor of English 



40 Faculty 




John Nicholas Burnett 
Maxwell Chambers Professor of 
Chemistry 



Faculty 41 




Jean S. Cornell 

Associate Professor of Speech 



Ft. Davison Dulin 
Lecturer in Chemistry 



C. Earl Edmondson 
Associate Professor of History 



42 Faculty 




a 



n*t 



Felix Alvin Carroll. Jr 

Associate Professor ol Chemistry 




Patricia B Edmondson 
I Lecturer in Humanities 




Professors: Can 
You Know Them? 

The professor — a figure who commands respect, 
whom you address as "Doctor," whose hands often hold 
your fate as a student. What would it be like to see this 
demigod at home, without a tie on, maybe even without 
shoes? A few lucky students have this unique opportunity 
every day, since they rent their rooms from professors and 
actually live within his private domain. 

Not surprisingly, these students find that they don't 
really get to know any of these professors' secrets. The 
ten students who rent rooms in professors' houses usually 
find that a professor, like any other landlord, tends to 
stick to a business relationship, concerning himself mainly 
with rent and maintenance of the apartment. Sophomore 
Jenny O'Briant, who lives in Dr. Holland's house about 
two miles off campus, has her own two rooms with a 
private entrance. Jenny said that it is "not like living with 



a professor at all." In fact, when she took one of Dr. 
Holland's classes fall term, his wife gently reminded her 
that students could see Dr. Holland at his office all day, 
and that Jenny should look for him there if she wanted to 
see him about class. 

This does not mean that professors don't get to know 
the students who live with them. Dr. Ed Palmer, who rents 
an apartment to juniors Mark Sheffield and Joe Jernigan, 
said, "We do interact informally." He finds, however, that 
students usually prefer privacy. Sophomore Dick Richards, 
who lives with John Lyday in the basement of Dr. Stroud's 
house, has gotten to know the family a little bit. "We've 
eaten dinner with them several times, and we see them 
around the yard." 

The greatest disadvantage to living in a professor's 
house, the students reported, is the isolation. As Jenny 
O'Briant said, "People don't travel two miles out Grey 
Road just to drop by." However, the distance which 
causes the isolation is also responsible for the greatest 
advantage to living off campus, which is peace and quiet. 
"It's great for studying," said senior Craig Rice, who lives 
with Dr. Polley; "I need it." There can also be other fringe 
benefits to living in a professor's house. For instance. Mrs. 
Holland once brought Jenny orange juice when she was 
sick. And, both Craig and Jenny commented on how 
much they like the houses they live in. With large rooms 
and well-organized decor, they can make a person feel 
almost at home. 

Renting a room from a professor gives the tenant 
distinct advantage over renting a room from any 
It does show him, however, that profe 
kind of deity nor any kind of ogre, but rar k 
with children to care for and houses I 
mow. And, as Craig Rice said of the F 
very, very nice people " B 



Faculty 43 




James Monroe Fredericksen 
Professor of Chemistry 



S 

Dirk French 

Associate Professor of Classics 



Davidson Singles 
Not So Lonely 

Whoever thought I'd be assigned an article on being 
single in Davidson? Certainly not I. Apprehensively I 
walked into the office of my unmarried (at the time) 
advisor, Dr. Cynthia Lewis. I decided to present a cool 
and sophisticated front: "Well, I'm doing this article for 
the yearbook staff, you know, and, uh, I was, like, 
wondering — well, sort of like how you spend your free 
time. What you do for fun, you know?" When she 
informed me that she was a certified bartender, I knew 
this was going to be interesting. 

Dr. Lewis tends bar for Rusk House which she serves as 
sponsor. At PAX, she gave a presentation on how to mix 
drinks. She also explained that for fun a lot of the single 
faculty go to student social events together or meet 
informally to go to Charlotte for movies. Last Halloween 
Dr. Lewis, Dr. Beatty, and Dr. McMillan went to the Rusk 
party dressed as Faustus, the good angel and the bad 
angel. Her favorite social function ever at Davidson was 
the Spongetones concert in spring 1981. Dr. Lewis 
commented, "The songs were popular when we were in 
college. It was nostalgic for us. The students saw it as 
new and fun. They were curious." The faculty and 
students danced together without feeling awkward at all. 

Encouraged by Dr. Lewis, I was courageous enough to 
approach Dr. Engell. I fully intended to be assertive, but 
as I started to formulate my deeply probing questions, I 
realized that my attire at that moment — a t-shirt and 
shorts — was not especially effective in presenting the 
image of a professional jottrnalist. Instead, I asked, "Is it 
O.K. if I talk to you a while? I'll understand if you don't 
have time. I know you're busy ... (ad infinitum.)" 

Dr. Engell immediately assured me that he'd much 
prefer a conversation to grading papers. From Dr. Engell I 
learned that professors, like students have a need to get 
away from the campus. Dr. Engell spends several 
weekends a month at llftC^Chapel Hill. He went to 
graduate school at Chapel Hill and returns there to visit 
old friends. Dr. Engell also likes Davidson a great deal, but 
he notes several aspects of the town that prove stifling to 
recreation. "You can't buy a major newspaper, like the 
Times, here except by subscription. That's incredible to 
me. Also there is not a bookstore, other than the Student 
Store, no bakery, movie theatre or adult bar." Still, these 
minor grievances are overshadowed by the small, 
hometown, family-oriented atmosphere of Davidson, 




John F. Engell 
Instructor in English 



something Dr. Engell finds very attractive. Dr. Engell finds 
Charlotte, in contrast to Davidson, a city confusing and 
ugly. "It has no place to walk around outside, no parks, 
although I do enjoy going to Spirit Square for plays and 
jazz or classical music concert." 

Now perfectly at ease with the idea of interviewing 
faculty members, I went to Dr. Leland Park in the library. 
His attitude was really one of surprise, because to him, 
work and a social life are not separate. "It's an enormous 
family — you socialize with the people you work with; the 
atmosphere is always one of family." He likes going to 
baseball games with Dr. Partin and Will Terry, and just 
having unorganized fun. According to Dr. Park, "You 
don't need a dramatic, exciting time to have a pleasant 
time. Getting to know others is exciting." 

Being single in Davidson is not a social setback. 
Enterprising professors and administrators seem to be 
able to keep themselves active. Although Davidson as a 
town does not have a great social life, the College does 
provide various forms of entertainment. If that fails, 
Charlotte is only a short drive away. ■ 



44 Faculty 




Faculty 45 




Lois Anne Kemp 

Associate Professor of Spanish 



46 Faculty 



"*•'. 







8 k « L. . P B 




WALTER HERBERT JACKSON, 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR of ART: 

With a one-person exhibition in New York's Phyllis Weil 
Gallery, a painting in the American Academy and Institute 
of Arts and Letters, and two prints in the 22nd Brooklyn 
Museum Print Biennial, Herb Jackson now begins work on 
36 drawings to be seen in 1983 at Charlotte's Mint 
Museum. In his Abstract paintings, Jackson strives to 
uncover what he calls his "personal symbol, " and he feels 
that as people become interested once again in 
Abstractionism, his work will become even more widely 
known. Evidence of this trend came when Jackson 
received a $2,000 grant from the National Endowment for 
the Arts fellowship program. 

LARRY L. LIGO, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR of ART: 

Over the past three years, Dr. Ligo has written critical 
papers on two contemporary photographers, Anne Noggle 
and John Pfahl. Recently he read these papers to the 
Society for Photographic Educators and the South Eastern 
College of Art Conference. Ligo believes photography, a 
"virgin territory" for art historians, profoundly influenced 
and was influenced by the painting of the nineteenth 
century. Eventually, according to Ligo, the history of 
nineteenth century painting may have to be rethought in 
terms of this relationship. 



John Dobbins Kelton 

Richardson Professor or Psychology 



Donald L Kimmel. Jr. 
Professor of Biology 




Lunstord Richardson King 
Professor of Mathematics 



Faculty 47 



Faculty Debates Tenure Policy 



Davidson students seem to perceive their lives at 
college idealistically. Davidson offers them a haven where 
they can temporarily escape from the pressures of the real 
world. Unfortunately, students often see their professors in 
this same light. However, aside from concerns over the 
cost of housing and food, faculty members constantly face 
the problem of tenure, or better, job security. 

On a recommendation from the Faculty Tenure 
Committee, Davidson professors debated whether or not 
this committee should play a role in tenure decisions. 
Currently, Dean Zimmermann requests recommendations 
from the head of the department of the faculty member 
up for tenure, and from professors in his or her 



department. Zimmermann then submits his own 
recommendation to President Spencer, who adds his own 
comments before forwarding the final recommendation to 
the Trustees. The five-member Tenure Committee would 
represent three divisions of the faculty and two at-large 
posts. Although several professors felt that the committee 
would help to make tenure decisions, many thought that 
committee members would be unqualified to make such 
decisions, since the committee members in the 
department of the tenure candidate would not vote. The 
tension over tenure decisions still exists and realistically 
always will. ■ 




George Labban, Jr. 

W. R Grey Professor of Classics 



48 Faculty 




Alexander Jeffrey McKelway 
Professor of Religion 



Glenn Carlos Lindsey 

Associate Professor of Economics 



Ann Hunter McMillan 
Assistant Professor of English 




Samuel Dow Maloney 

James Sprunt Professor of Religion 



Robert John Manning 
Associate Professor of Physics 



Faculty 49 



m rf^- -** 


/ a 






s 


v y 








l«Hr 




^6 






^ 




' "^^R ' 








W. Vladimir Morosan 








Instructor in Music 










Robert f. Maydole 

Associate Professor of Philosophy 



50 Faculty 




ALFRED R. MELE, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of PHILOSOPHY: 

For his paper entitled "Aristotle on the Justification of 
Ends. " Dr. Mele received the Richard M Griffith. Ph.D.. 
Memorial Award from the Southern Society for Philosophy 
and Psychology. Artistotle. to Mele. did find it possible to 
justify ethical ends, even the ultimate ethical end of 
happiness. Challenging the commonly-held view that 
Aristotle considered man unable to justify his desire of 
happiness. Mele. in the sixth of his published articles on 
the Greek philosopher's moral psychology and ethics, 
explained that the desire for happiness can be justified by 
an understanding of what is involved in the ultimate end. 
i. e. health, moral excellence, etc. 

RANDY F. NELSON, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of ENGLISH: 

In his first book. The Almanac of American Letters. Dr. 
Nelson reveals humorous, bizarre and tragic tales behind 
American literature that he has been accumulating since 
graduate school. "The story behind the story is often 
more interesting than the story itself, and that's what I've 
written in this book. It's intended to be a refreshing 
supplement to whatever real literary history you've been 
reading." Anticipating letters from readers. Nelson already 
plans to compile these letters with even more literary trivia 
in a revised second edition of The Almanac, proof that he 
"can get out there in the marketplace and hustle. " 






Malcolm Overslreet Partm 
Professor of History 



Faculty 51 




I 



Daniel Durham Rhodes 

Paul C. Freeland Professor of 

Religion 



Charles Edward Ratliff 

William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of 

Economics 



Profs Stupefy 
With Witticisms 

Creativity abounds in the classroom. Sure, Davidson has 
its share of intelligent, witty students; but, amazingly 
enough, many professors garner their own witticisms and 
astound their students with their command of the English 
language. 

Each professor has his own favorite expression or habit 
which lingers on for year after year in the minds of 
adoring students. Dr. Samuel Maloney, for example, has a 
voice that reportedly will carry to the Red Sea, and he is 
fond of putting it to work in his Religion classes. Dr. 
Charles Ratliff, throughout an economics lecture, seems 
strongly attracted to the blackboard. By the end of each 
lecture he has nearly covered himself with chalkdust. 

Many professors repeat words or phrases enough to be 
characterized by them. Dr. Louise Nelson's "Let's have a 
writ" brings terror daily to scores of economics students. 
And students of Mr. Charles Lloyd are forewarned when 
he cites a particular author as "a quizmaker's dream." 

Lloyd and Dr. Gill Holland both repeat variations of the 
following admonishment to delinquent English students: 
"What do you mean you haven't read that? What do you 
do with your spare time anyway?" Holland also resounds 
a hearty "that's great stuff" in describing "masterpieces" 
of English literature. Dr. Cynthia Lewis, also of the English 
Department, encourages students with "yeah . . . yeah" 
when they come forth with astute comments. 

On the scientific side of the college, biology students 
should easily recognize three all-time favorite expressions 
of Dr. Jerry Putnam: "No pain, no gain" (a truth in fact, 
so say his students); "Let me edify you"; and "Get 
saged." Dr. David Grant makes statements perfectly clear 
to his biology students with "in point of fact ..." 

German professor Erich Wruck bellows "Mensch!" each 
time a student fails to translate a passage accurately, 
whereas Dr. Mark Davies of the Classics Department 
admits, "I know I'm being pedantic," when he grades 
those reviews oh-so-strictly. Spanish professor Hernandez- 




Jeremiah Lee Putnam 
Associate Professor of Biology 



Chiroldes never fails to call his reviews "facilisimo!" Dr. 
Clark Ross in addition likes "vis-a-vis" when discussing 
economic theory. 

Neither time nor space allows the listing of each 
professor's favorite expression, but rest assured that all of 
them do have characteristic phrases which will ring in the 
ears of students for years to come. "Yeah . . . yeah." ■ 



52 Faculty 




Merlyn D Schuh 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 



Faculty 53 




/. Job Thomas 

Assistant Professor of History 

Director of South Asian Studies 



W / 
Homer Bates Sutton 
Assistant Professor of French 



James G. Swisher 
Assistant Professor of Music 



54 Faculty 





CLARK G. ROSS, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of ECONOMICS: 

Approaching the problem of a twenty percent youth 
unemployment rate, Dr. Ross submitted a paper offering 
possible solutions for the teenaged jobless to the N. C 
2000 Commission. Some of Ross ' suggestions included a 
state jobs corps, youth-hiring tax credit and high school 
jobs counselors, and could become part of the policy 
recommendations to be sent to Governor Hunt before 

1983. Ross' $13 million program proposes employment of 
4000 people, from 16-19 years old. Since his plans would 
reach fewer than ten percent of the 50, 000 unemployed 
North Carolinian students, Ross recognizes that the 
complacency of this state is the problem which must first 
be solved. 

DAVID E. SHI, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of HISTORY: 

To allow him to work on his forthcoming book, The 
Simple Life: Plain Living and High Thinking in American 
Culture, Dr. Shi received two fellowships. During the 
academic year, Shi will take advantage of his award from 
the National Endowment for the Humanities, while the 
fellowship from the National Humanities Center in North 
Carolina 's Research Triangle Park will carry him and his 
family from January to August of 1983. Shi's book, which 
Oxford University Press plans to publsih in 1983 or early 

1984, will promote the philosophy of the simple life — an 
attitude which Shi feels must grow with the decrease of 
natural resources, increase of population and rise of 
inflation. By underscoring historical figures who followed 
the moderate life, Shi hopes that citizens will realize the 
benefits of simplicity. 

LANCE K. STELL, ASSOCIATE 
PROFESSOR of PHILOSOPHY: 

Under a fellowship from the National Humanities Center 
in North Carolina's Research Triangle Park, Dr. Stell will 
spend the next academic year studying group and 
individual rights. Stell feels certain interest groups are 
wrongly seeking rights for themselves as collective entities 
rather than for their members as individuals. To him, only 
individuals have rights, and legislation should recognize 
that a person must receive punishment or justification 
through his own merits and not through some sort of 
value that is automatically gained by belonging to a 
group. Stell points to the filling of quotas in legislature and 
in the job market as obvious problems spawned through 
the concept of groups' rights. 



Faculty 55 



The Strange And Awful Truth Concerning 
The Contents Of Gill Holland's Office 



In all truthfulness, it wasn't as bad as I had been led to 
expect. I mean, the words Chambers 32 1C struck fear 
into my heart by the time I gained the courage to contact 
the occupant of this foreboding office. Everyone said, "Dr. 
Holland's office? I hear things grow in there ... " "I 
wouldn't touch it with a ten-foot pole." "Didn't they lose a 
student in there once?" I felt like I was being sent up the 
river to get Kurtz; an apocalypse was sure to result from 
my journey. 

But things are rarely as bad as they are purported to 
be, and Dr. Holland's office is no exception. No dead 
bodies covered the floor; no mysterious fungi that / could 
detect oozed from any year-old coffee cups. The only 
growing thing in the room was a papyrus plant, and even 
it looked a bit haggard. No, the rumors about this office 
exaggerate far too much. 

There is no mistaking a certain hominess about the 
place, however. Perhaps it was the six-year supply of 
Christian Science Monitor that made me feel so at home. 
Or maybe it was the fact that all his chairs were filled with 
stacks of yellowing papers, and I would have had to sit on 



the floor if I wanted to sit. Even then, I would have been 
sitting on papers. The art on the walls (and chairs, and 
bookshelves) might have created that homey feel. His 
childrens' drawings covered one bulletin board, which was 
nice, though I forgot to ask how old his children are these 
days (they could be really old drawings and really old 
children). On one shelf sits a bottle of Nehi Ginger Ale, 
one of his "gifts from admiring students." And books 
everywhere. If sheer volume is cause for terror, I should 
have had a heart attack upon entering the room. Dr. 
Holland's cool demeanor and total disregard for the chaos 
surrounding him dispelled any residual fears, however. 

"I got behind," he explained. "The last six years have 
been pretty rough." It was a fair enough explanation. He 
said Dr. Ortmayer started the whole trend when he failed 
to pick up the Christian Science Monitors he had saved 
for him. That, added with the "importunate students" who 
"drag a fellow down," created the "compost heaps of 
learned scholarship" that make up Dr. Holland's famous 
office. ■ 




Peter Joseph Venturelli 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 




Christine W. Vance 

Visiting Assistant Professor of 

French 



56 Faculty 




Mary Caroline Thornberry 
Assistant Professor of Political 
Science 



£ . * \r- 



Julius Sherman Winkler 
Associate Professor of Germar 



Faculty 57 



RUSS C. WARREN, ASSISTANT 
PROFESSOR of ART: 

Reviewers from several major art periodicals and the 
Village Voice described Russ Warren's work in the 1981 
Whitney Museum of Art's Biennial Exhibition of American 
Artists as "False Image, False Niavite, New Image, New 
Wave, and Neo-Expressionist. " Artforum magazine named 
Warren "Most Promising /Not Well Known, " out of the 
show of 1 15 artists, 65 of whom live and work in New 
York City. Along with several other figurative artists, 
Warren has also been included in an Albright-Knox 
exhibition. Warren's stiff, simplified figures live in a dark 
world, victims of their own fears and dreams. They "teeter 
on the edge of the abyss, " unable to walk away from 
what they do and cannot understand. 

JOHN H. WILLIAMSON, PROFESSOR of 
BIOLOGY: 

With a $10,000 grant from New York City's Research 
Corporation, Dr. Williamson will purchase equipment, 
employ a student assistant, and breed thousands of 
drosphilia (fruit flies) to investigate the genetic basis for 
the aging process. According to Williamson, "It's widely 
believed that aging is a genetically determined biological 
process, but it's never been proven. The alternative theory 
says that aging is a function of the wear and tear on our 
bodies from everyday life. However, I think the evidence 
that we're born with the aging process built into our 
chromosomes is much stronger." In June Williamson 
received a $26,550 grant from the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) to purchase a spectrophotometer, 
fraction collector, pump, power supply and incubator that 
Williamson will use to analyze enzyme activity in the 
drosphilia. 




58 Faculty 




ROTC DEPARTMENT; (first row) Sergeant Willie Harris. Captain Niel H Touchet. Sergeant First 
Class Lawrence £ Brooks (second row) Captain Albert G Brauer. Major William R Pittman. 
Garland L Keever. Staff Sergeant Daniel Moore 



Faculty 59 




Mary D. Beaty 

Assistant Director of the Library 
Reference Coordinator for 
Independent Study 



William H. Bolding 
Director of Student Housing 




SECURITY DEPARTMENT: 

(left to right) Officer Johnny Griffin, Officer Wayne King, 
Chief Jackie Hughes, Sargeant Harold Cook, Officer Charles 
Burton. 

MAINTENANCE STAFF, GYM: 

(back, left to right) Elmer Bost, Wiley Conder, Eudell Wilson 
Donald Kistler. (middle) David Reid, Grier Wilson (front) 
Buddy Robbins. 




Bruce Todd Bums 

Computer Operations Manager 



60 Staff, Administration 




Michel C. Daisley 

Director of Corporate Programs 



Staff. Administration 61 




Robert Arrowood Currie 
Business Manager 



John V. Griffith 

Director of Admissions and Financial 

Aid 



62 Staff, Administration 



Robert W Davidson 
Comptroller 





Amelia Dockery 
Clinical Psychologist 



Janle K French 
Administrative Assistant 
Guest House Manager 




Housekeeping: 

It's 

Not A Pretty Job 

Sally Hughes regularly heard "loud thumps" outside her 
room this year. The source? Garbage bags from the sky. 
Every weekday morning, the housekeeping staff bags up 



the trash from each floor and drops it outside through the 
stairwell windows. Memories of falling garbage bags may 
haunt students for some time, but the actual phenomena 
has ended. Staff members said their supervisor 
discontinued the "drop" method, because the grounds 
department said it "was hurting the grass." Housekeepers 
didn't know that grass ever existed outside the rear 
stairwell of Cannon. Nevertheless, they now carry the 
trash down the stairs. The ladies remember that "men 
used to bring it down," but as the women's movement 
takes its toll, "no gentlemen help anymore." 

In general the housekeeping staff and students get 
along well. The only major complaints of staff members 
are the mudfight messes and the amount of trash left in 
dorms at the end of the year. Said Georgia Black, who 
has worked in perimeter housing and dorms, "sometimes 
toilet seats are gone, or there's butter on toilet seats, but 
I think mud is the worst." The guys' fun culminates in the 
girls' bathrooms, but the housekeepers have to "mop the 
floors and walls and clean the shower curtains," said 
Georgia. "It's pathetic." 

Somebody cleans up after students outside of the 
dorms as well as inside. Since 1956 Roy Lynch has 
worked for Davidson, laying bricks, firing boilers and now 
gathering trash on the college yards. Has Mr. Lynch, who 
fought in the French Invasion, liked his work at Davidson? 
He enjoys the students: "When I first came here it was all 
boys, but now it's nice to see all the girls here. That's life 
at Davidson, the students." One night during exams, a 
student marched across campus, methodically ripping and 
scattering the pages of his book behind him. Mr. Lynch 
patiently placed the pages in his yellow bag the next 
morning, cleaning up after Davidson students. ■ 



Staff, Administration 63 





Warner L. Hall 

Senior Associate 

Office of Special Resources 



Richard L. Jones 
Admissions Counselor 



Zachary F. Long, Jr. 
Special Assistant to the Vice 
President for Development 




Julius W. Melton. Jr. 
Executive Director for Resource 
Development 



64 Staff, Administration 



DORMITORY CUSTODIAL STAFF: 

(left to right) John Beattie. Ruth Kernes (seated). Laura Jean Huntley (standing), James Derr. Brenda McCain, John 
Houston. Earnest Sloan, Georgia Black. Robert Gibby. Earl Caldwell. Talmadge Conner. 





Rachel Washam 

Assistant Manager of the Student 

Store 



Peter Nicholls 

Manager of the Student Store 



Leland Madison Park 
Director of the Library 



Staff. Administration 65 



H 








1 


Jw 


Ruth W. Pittard 




Departmental Assistant. 


Audio-Visual 


Service 


^^ 




Carleton Pritchard 
Director of Food Service 




Charles A Summers 
College Chaplain 



66 Staff, Administration 




Robert J Stephenson 
Director of Personnel and 
Administrative Services 



Colin Shaw Smith 

Director of the College Union 

Coordinator of Student Activities 




Shooting Down The Ratio: Davidson 
Admissions Team Takes Aim At 

ill a I Race, sex, economic background — these are some of 

\J\ /(*) 1TX~\ (^ t^\ f\ f~\(i ,ne ma J or considerations that the Davidson Admissions Team 

w Vv/I I I \_y I I I \\ \\d makes about an applicant. An additional twenty-or-so factors 

. ., i.i later and Davidson, according to Cass and Birnbaum's 

l\ #1 1 1~\ (^\ 1* I T I £^ ^ Comparative Guide to American Colleges, earns itself the 

IV I M I V^l I LI^^O rank of second most selective college in the South. Before a 

perspective receives his acceptance notice, his application 
will have been evaluated by one of the Admissions staff and 
by two members of the Faculty Admissions Committee. 
The policy determining what is or is not best suited to 
Davidson has toughened recently, and two points of focus 
involve the admission of minorities and women. In 1981-82, 
three per cent of the student body came from minority 
groups, while the 1982-83 year will bring up the enrollment 
to five per cent. Women also find the door less barred since 
the trustees, under the suggestion of Admissions Director 
John Griffith and Sam Spencer, revoked the thirty-three per 
cent quota limit on women and raised it to allow forty per 
cent of the 1982 freshmen class to be female. 

One favorable aspect of the policy that hopefully will not 
change concerns aid-blind admissions. For the coming year, 
even in the face of President Reagan's financial aid cuts, 
Davidson will continue to accept students without regard to 
their aid needs. 

In order to make the college more diverse, and therefore 
stronger, the Admissions Board sends recruiters to appeal to 
students from a more widespread geographic area. The 
efforts of the team were successful, and diversity and 
selectivity were two easily attained qualities since the 
Admissions team had 1600 applicants from which to choose 
the 680 students to whom they sent acceptance letters. ■ 




Staff, Administration 67 




ivy 

Kathleen Stevenson 

Assistant Director of Financial Aid 

and Admissions Counselor 



68 Staff, Administrafion 




Kenneth N Wood 

Director of the Careers Office 



'rice Zimmermann 
Vice President for Academic Affairs 
Dean of the Faculty 



Staff, Administration 69 



lot of talk but little action says Freshman Senator Craig 




Detweiler's comment about his experience with the S.Q.A. 
Craig feels that "the power of student government should lie In 
committees which carry out activities that visibly benefit the entire 
school body." S.G.A. Vice President, Chip Hurley, says that he too 
would like to see the committees strengthened and more ideas 
implemented along the "action lines," such as the Rides Committee, 
but he notes that "our primary role is to act as a sounding board." 
Furthermore, "the S.G.A.'s role at most other schools is like our 
union — they are purely social. We're the only one that acts in an 
advisory role to the administration. In comparison, we are defintiely 
doing a lot more." 

Is apathy the cause of such seeming inactivity? In the December 
15 elections for offices of Union Board, Y-Service Corps, publication 
editorships and freshman advisors, only 57 % of the student body 
voted. Candidates for the yearbook editorship and all the Y-Corps 
posts ran unopposed. But lack of time rather than lack of concern 
seems to be the reason behind reluctance to become involved. 

The Y-Student Service Corps and Davidson Christian Fellowship 
hold the largest memberships. Other organizations offer a means for 
i personal enrichment as well as a sense of contribution to the 
i community. To the Davidsonian staff, the satisfaction of seeing that 
by-line makes staying up all night to meet the Thursday deadline 
worth it. Winning makes hours of memorizing facts seem more than 
pedantic to the College Bowl team. 

Sarah Mumy, head of the Senior Citizen block of the Y-Corps, 
seems to best sum up the opinions of students involved in 
organizations: "You come here to get a liberal education. You can 
go to a college with books and you can be with real people. I think 
you need to balance one with the other." ■ 




Whether measuring, beating, or 
buzzing, Davidson hands play 
many roles. (Opposite page) Dan 
Turk (top) lays out the 
Davidsonian. (Below left) Theresa 
Woody, program director of 
WDAV, spends hours balancing 
selections from Beethoven to 
Ravel. Joe Langley (below right) 
improvises his tune at the Black 
Student Coalition's contribution 
to the Union Christmas Party. No 
party for Marvin Overbey (this 
page left) as the College Bowl 
team trounces a team of 
professors during a challenge 
match. The real challenge for 
Lee McCormick (below), head 
photographer of the Quips and 
Cranks, is that first deadline. 




Organizations 



SGA's goals: 
fun and money 



Realizing the need to plan 
for the future, the Student 
Government Association (SGA) 
sponsored programs designed 
to help students in their 
career choices. Davidson 
graduate John Gerdy, (right), 
discusses his change from 
college basketball star to 
professional athlete at the 
SGA 's Career Symposium. In 
addition to considering those 
already at the college, the 
SGA held a phonathon to 
raise money from alumni so 
that incoming students might 
benefit from a strong Living 
Endowment. Bob Bowden. (far 
right) makes an attempt to get 
a donation during the ten 
day long fund-raising event. 
To give some of the rising 
freshmen a chance to determine 
whether Davidson is the 
right school for them, the 
SGA arranged a weekend's 
activities to introduce high 
school perspectives to dorm 
and academic life. Committee 
head Ester Kim (below right), 
plans the particulars of the 
March weekend which included 
talks by college students, 
a people hunt, and a square 
dance. 




STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION' (first row) Ellen Papadeas. Meg 
Surratl. Melissa McKeithen. Sandy Fossetl. Boe Young. Ester Kim. (second 
row) Burt Taylor. Anne Hurt. Joe Ford. Barry Mack. Warner Hall. Jim 
Reaves. Joe Langley. Mark Oldenburg, (third row) Tim Johnston, Warren 
Gould. Anne Rollins. Sherburne Laughlin. Rod Holman, Scott Eblin, Chip 
Hurley. Gray Hampton. 




72 Organizations 



^ 



m 



V 




/ 



/ 



• 



/ 



X 










\y 




/ 





Spotlight: Honor 
Code 



"The Honor Code works 
from a combination of 
idealism and fear," admits 
Will Terry, Dean of Students. 
This year, while idealism 
continued motivating 
students to help enforce the 
Honor Code, the single most 
important issue was a need 
to see it in action. 

The spotlighting of the 
Honor Code began in the fall 
when The Davidsonian 
published an entire issue 
dealing with student opinion 
about the Honor Code. 
Included were descriptions of 
the events surrounding past 
Honor Code violations and 
susquent convictions. The 
Davidsonian followed this 
issue with several articles 
dealing with the system. The 
results of a poll conducted 
by Dr. Kazee's public opinion 
class were reported: 74% 
felt that the code needed no 
revision; yet in another 
question, 36% felt most 
violations go unreported. 
Dean Terry, encouraged by 
the percentage of students 
pleased with the system, 
attributed the negative 
response to the second 
question to a lack of 
education about the Honor 
Code. An ongoing issue, 
according to Terry, remains 



the fact that "Many, many 
upperclassmen take the 
system for granted. They 
have developed good habits, 
assume others have too, and 
aren't vigilant." 

To combat the problem, 
the Honor Council held a 
mock trial during winter term 
that allowed students to see 
the usual judicial procedure 
followed in the trials of 
reported cases. Junior 
Catherine Smith commented, 
"It heightened everyone's 
awareness of what really 
happens at a trial." 

These educational efforts 
seem to have succeeded in 
raising general student 
awareness about how the 
system works. The fact that 
75% of all convicted 
students return to Davidson 
represents a strength of the 
Honor Code. Another sign of 
a healthy system was the 
extremely high number of 
upperclassmen running for 
Honor Council positions in 
the spring. As freshman 
Honor Council candidate 
Janet Morris stated, "The 
Honor Code is the most 
driving force at Davidson; 
without it, it would lose its 
unique character. I want 
to insure that it is 
enforced." ■ 




HONOR COUNCIL: (first row) Sally Campbell. Debbie Metzgar. Carol Roche. 
Lucy Marshall. Katie Dagenhart, Patti Long, (second row) Jim Cheek. Guy 
McFayden, Rick Gaines. Terry Kurtts. Steve Carter. Danny Waddill. Stokes 
Peebles, Bobby Silva. Howard Browne. True Davis. 




74 Organizations 




The mock trial (bottom 
center), sponsored by the 
Honor Council, demonstrates 
typical Honor Code violation 
hearing procedure. During 
this trial. Student Soliciter 
Chip Christian (top left), 
brings charges against Hill 
Stockton who plays the role 
of the defendant. In another 
educational effort, Honor 
Council President Steve 
Carter (top center), visits 
freshmen halls, assisted by 
hall counselor David Carrin 
answering questions about 
the system. Self scheduled 
exams handed out by SGA 
members Rob lies and Ester 
Kim (above), show a benefit 
of a healthy system. 



Mock trial 
heightens 
awareness 



Organizations 75 



BSC joins the 

Patterson Court 

Community 



Because of increased 
membership, the Black 
Student Coalition (BSC) 
moved into a larger house on 
Patterson Court. The BSC 
also plans to use the house 
for parties that would bring 
in the non-BSC members. 
Leon Mason (right), and 
Janet Stovall (bottom), 
model clothes for the BSC's 
fashion show. To address 
more serious political issues, 
Julian Bond, (bottom right), 
spoke as the BSC's first 
Martin Luther King Lecturer. 
BSC members, far right, 
enjoy the carefree side of life 
as they join to sing. 





76 Organizations 




BLACK STUDENT COALITION (first row) Gary Banks. Renee Jones. 
Mitzi Short. Suzanne Hutching, Harriet Gaston. James Jones (second 
row) Wendy Boulware. Andre Goodlett. Judy Harrell. Atondra Williams. 
Janet Stovall. Andre Kennebrew (third row) Charles Hoc- 



Sherman Allen. Elame Stone. Vanessa Adams. Dwayn* / 

row) Thomas B Johnson. David Turner. Keith Elfe Leon 

Mason. Kenny Wilso- " 

Frank Johnson 



Organizations 77 




El Salvador: The 
political topic 



Angered by U.S. activities in 
El Salvador, liberal students 
attended the country-wide 
protest held in Washington 
D.C. Susan Roberts, C.K. 
Nichols, and Jerome Hay 
(top), join Mark Sheffield, 
Debbie Eisenbise, Professor 
Pat Edmondson (right), and 
other students (center), to 
show their disagreement with 
Reagan's policies. In a less 
dramatic manner, a young 
Republican, (top right), reads 
over the minutes from an 
earlier meeting. 



78 Organizations 




YOUNG DEMOCRATS .m Overby. Joanna Hunt. Ju 

(second row) Paul Baynard. Harriet Gaston (third row) David Gaston. 
Bobby : 




YOUNG REPUBLICANS (first row) Chip Hurley. Lucy Everett. Tripp Robinson. Jeff Nielsen is 
Carr. Jeb Benedict. Carl Anderson. Bill Bargmann 



Organizations 79 



Y Corps invests 
time and energy 



Under President John 
Spangler (bottom center), 
The Y Student Service Corps 
engaged in a variety of 
activities. Early in the fall, 
Betsy Thomas (bottom right), 
signs up freshman members. 
New members can 
participate in numerous 
programs, such as visiting 
prisoners, supporting the 
CROP World Hunger Fund, 
and working with community 
youngsters. Nancy Cloyed 
(right), plays with one of the 
children attending the 
Davidson Day Care Center. 
In addition to their work, Y 
members enjoy a weekend 
mountain retreat. While John 
Spangler and Jodie Kinnett 
square dance (below), 
Professor David Shi (top 
right), travels in circles. 




1 1 V Jlk 


IssJv ^O" 


1 FmU 



Y-BLOCKHEADS: (first row) Pam Steadman. Anne Rollins. Mike Kelly. Andy 
Wilson. Norman Gordon, (second row) Clara White, Kathleen Huff. Cathi 
Dumas, Melissa McManis. (third row) Liz Ribadeneyra. Florence Hart, 
Elizabeth Kelly. Susan Campbell. Drew Davis. Katherine Murray, Doug 
Ammar, Brown Patterson. 




80 Organizations 



*■ 



» 







DAVIDSON FMfRGENC* MSCLil SERVh 

•y, Sloan \\ i •> 

Hoolen. I " - WWfW £•• 



Scoff Offo vo/ed 
Ugliest Mug 
On Campus 




■ .>se students who wanted 
to get involved by heii 
others, both the Alpha Phi Omega 
(APO), a service fraternity, and 
the Davidson Emergency Rescue 
Service (DERS) provided a channel 
to direct their beneficial talents. 
Scott Otto, (top right), finds that 
his looks alone can help as he gives 
the grin that won him and Frank Meyers 
the coveted Ugliest Man on Campus title 
and earned money for the Cystic 
Fibrous Foundation in a fund- 
raiser sponsored by the APO. In 
another of the APO's events. Eric 
Weiss (far left), mans a table at 
the Activities Fair where freshmen 
can find out about campus clubs. 
The DERS. supported by the 
volunteer Emergency Medical 
Technicians (EMT's) (top right), 
gives medical aid to students. 
Sloan Warner (bottom) administers 
the initial care to an injured 
patient before he is taken to the 
infirmary for further help. 
Like the other members of the DERS. 
Sloan has taken an EMT training 
course which was taught by a 
professional EMT during winter term. 




Organizations 83 




DAVIDSON CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: (first row) 
Thomas Bates, Lee Ann Stackhouse, Debbie Metzgar. (second row) Carolyn 
Mangelsdorf, Lisa Harbottle, Rocky Stone, (third row) Ann Turk. Tandy 
Gilliland, Brent Hilleary. 



84 Organizations 




The Davidson Christian 

Fellowship remains a strong 

and active organization, 

dominating the campus 

religious scene. The group is 

structured around the 

popular small group meeting. 

in which students gather 

under the leadership of 

volunteers to discuss the 

Bible or other matters of 

interest. Doug Ammar and 

Jay Toslosky (bottom center) 

enjoy refreshments at their 

weekly meeting. The less 

popular large group provides 

an opportunity for the more 

than 200 members to hear 

speakers such as Bill 

Iverson, or president Alex 

McCallie (left), or join in the 

fellowship of song with 

members Alicia Dewey, Jodie 

Kinnett, Eric Fichtner, and 

Mike Blake (below). DCF 

also sponsers retreats such 

as that enjoyed by executive 

members Rocky Stone and 

Lisa Harbottle (far left). 



DCF: It's more 
than just a cult 







Organizations 85 




86 Organizations 







-ghgg — ^ 


»••■_ , ^_ \jL _ 



Mee/ //re men iv/jo 

took Davidson 

to the national 

championships 




In the first ot this series 
of photos, (left), the 
Davidson College Bowl team, 
consisting of Gordon 
Turnbull. Brad Mullis. Marvin 
Overby. and John Eghn show 
just how much their success 
was achieved through team 
work as they look to one 
another for support. After 
conferring, the rest of the 
team gives way to ecstatic 
expression as Overby 
answers correctly and 
then rises supreme. 
Unable to receive help from 
his teammate (far bottom 
left), Mullis makes a hopeful 
gesture which inevitably 
helped lead the group to 
their second place finish in 
the Southeast regionals. 
Participating in the intramural 
bowl, the Invincible 
Turtlewomen (top left), give 
in to roaring laughter at a 
question answered more 
interestingly than correctly 
by Helen Thorpe. The Studs, 
including Bob Trobich. Rob 
Gillison. Jim Cheek, and 
Andy Brown (top far left), 
have a more serious attitude 
about the sport as each 
member presses himself 
farther into the table as they 
consider a question. 



Organizations 87 



• ^ 




Buckley, Bond 
highlight year 



From politics to physics, the 
list of 198 1-82 speakers 
included FIOTC 
Commissioner General Price, 
(clockwise from center), 
Conservative William F. 
Buckley, Reynolds Lecturer 
Joseph Weizenbaum. 
Georgia Senator Julian Bond, 
Dean of Admissions at Duke 
University Dr. Suydam 
Osterhaut, University of 
Michigan Professor Carl 
Cohen, and North Carolina 
Governor James B. Hunt. 



fl W ' 



88 Organizations 





Organizations 89 




90 Organizations 




During the winter, WDAV radio 
station held its third annual 
Radiothon. A young girl (below), 
plays a violin 

in one of the musical groups 
featured in the live 
presentations which were part 
of the fund-raiser. Though 
56,000 dollars were raised, 
Station Manager John Clark, 
(top center), cut back the 
student-run portion of 
broadcasting from three to 
two hours per day. The cut 
came as quite a setback to 
independent student radio 
since WDSR. the only totally 
student-led station stopped 
broadcasting in 198 1 because 
of faulty equipment. Alternate 
music director Jon Glance 
(bottom center), holds up a 
Captain Beefheart album which 
fulfills the requirement 
stipulated by Clark for the 
student programming by being 
"music not heard on other 
stations." Victor Hawk (top 
right), and Scott Eblin (bottom 
left), play new wave, alternative 
rock, and reggae as a break 
from the classical music which 
dominates WDA V's program. 
Shannon Anderson (top left), 
a student at Davidson, plans 
an alternative music broadcast 
in order to give the airtime 
the focus that Clark thought 
the three hour programs lacked. 
To tighten the shows, Glance 
initiated weekly staff meetings. 



More Bach than 
rock on WDAV 




Organizations 91 



The Davidsonian: Year Of Improvement 



When Stewart Cauley took over the Davidsonian 
editorship from John Siman at the start of winter term, he 
had only one goal in mind: to involve more people and 
make more of a staff. According to Cauley, "Siman ran a 
one-man show, but the interesting thing about Siman is that 
he is capable of doing the work of fifteen people. I couldn't 
do that. I didn't want that mental pressure." Before running 
for the editorship Cauley learned how to run the new 
typesetting machine. With a core of technical people who 
understood the computer system, Cauley recruited more 
writers and set up a division of labor so that writers could 
concentrate on their articles while technical workers could 
finalize, paste-up and typeset. As a result more work was 
done on campus rather than at the printer's office. 
Freshmen were also a new asset to the paper. Elizabeth 
Elkin served as photo editor and David Resnik as news 
editor while other freshmen worked as proofreaders and 
typesetters. 

By adding an art and literary supplement, Cauley also 
involved more students in the newspaper. Four years ago 
the paper had an art section. Cauley felt it would be a 



"good thing" to bring it back. Other changes in the actual 
format of the paper included more use of spot color which 
costs twenty-five dollars per issue as compared to four- 
color which costs seven hundred dollars per issue. Cauley 
also decreased the number of comic strips: "I'd rather run 
articles or photographs." 

Looking back over the year Cauley felt the Davidsonian 
should have made stronger political statements concerning 
policy changes. He also felt he should have written 
editorials each week. The El Salvador protest coverage and 
the articles on student aid cuts were the type of journalism 
Cauley sensed most beneficial to the college community. 
Finally Cauley added, "Being editor was more strenuous 
than I expected. It's like a forty hour a week job with 
school on the side." 

As for next year, Cauley's suggestions include a seven 
week transition and training internship for the new editor. 
He would also like to alternate the format of the paper from 
week to week: one week a cultural supplement, the next a 
political supplement. With these improvements and the 
large number of trained freshmen, next year looks good. ■ 




92 Organizations 





Under its 1981 editor John 
Siman (left), the Davidsonian 
office underwent a major 
renovation 1982 editor 
Stewart Cauley (below) and 
staff writer Brian Butler 
(bottom center), stay up all 
night, working on the paper 
while enjoying Siman's newly 
acquired, furniture Thurston 
Hatcher (far left) types the 
final copy of the paper on 
the new typesetting machine, 
another Siman purchase 
rejoiced over by a weary 
staff, who finishes the paper 
just in time for their 9:00 
classes. 



The Davidsonian 
makes changes, 
improves office 




DAVIDSONIAN (periphery) Tom Pafford. Debby Williams. John 
James Moore. Brian Buller. Sue Graves. Jeff Hamilton. Jeff Hern 
Alessandro Vitelli. Todd Swofford. Elizabeth Smiley. Kans Hemstem. Eric 
Long. Anderson Scott. Elizabeth Kiss. Diana Bohrer. Jeff Mann, (center) 
Stewart Cauley. Steve Soud. John Hartman. Sissy McCamy Unidentified 
Lisa Boardman 



Organizations 93 



Quips and Cranks 
fits the pieces 



The yearbook staff continued 
to make rapid improvements 
in 1982, following a well 
received 1981 edition 
(below). After an initial 
planning session in Boone 
(far right), the group settled 
down to working both in the 
darkroom and the office. 
Photographer Randy Stroud 
(bottom right) and sport 
editor Cliff Savage (right) 
display the skills needed to 
publish the 320 page book, 
as editor-in-chief Karen 
"Bob" Welty (below) settles 
in for another 35-hour work 
week. Some staff members 
continued working into the 
1982-83 school year. 



# 




94 Organizations 




QUIPS AND CRANKS STAFF: (first row) Meg Surratt. Martha Nelson. 
Elizabeth Smiley. Ross Thayer. Janet Lmdsey. Nancy Rosselot. Cindy Clark. 
Paul Mainella (second row) Rob Spaugh. Lori Boardman. Chris Gauch. Beth 
Geiger. Paul Loggms. Kathy Gratto. Kathleen Hull. Andy Harrison, (third 
row) Karen Welty. Carol Roche. Dale Withrow. Rick Horlbeck. Jim Reese. 
CM1 Savage (fourth row) Randy Stroud. Tom Schember (not pictured) Mike 
Allen. Tracy Thompson. Lee McCormick Jim Morgan. Caroline Boudreau. 
Caroline Rumley. Francis Palmer. Rhetl Brown. Sally Campbell. Bert Wolf. 
Ann Meador. Lisa Boardman 

Organizations 95 



The Code Of Responsibility: 
How Pervasive, Is Its Influence? 



The Code of Responsibility clearly emphasizes "the 
responsible use of freedom, as opposed to license." 
Unfortunately, the 1981-82 school year saw several major 
violations of this code. These violations threaten the 
stability of the Davidson College community. Without 
creating an atmosphere of distrust and paranoia, the 
College found itself having to deal seriously and sternly with 
students involved in embezzlement and vandalism. Last 
summer Davidsonian editor John Siman uncovered two 
students routinely taking money from campus organizations. 
However, nearly $3300 was stolen before Siman's 
discovery. Even though the students returned the money, 
the problem still remains. According to Business Manager 
Bob Currie, Davidson College does not conduct random 
audits of Patterson Court. Currie admits that he would not 
be surprised "to see the day come when we see an audit 
of each house each year." But for the present, the College 
is trying to avoid the unnecessary expense of such audits. 
To minimalize auditing problems elsewhere, the Business 
Office has taken over the accounts of most school 
organizations. Now only the SGA and The Davidsonian 
have their own accounts. Currie hopes that next year both 
these organizations will pay all their expenses through the 




How students 

demonstrate 

responsibility 



After the typesetting 
machine broke, Brian Butler 
(top), estimates the cost of 
repairs. To keep their house 
running smoothly, Wendy 
Rider and Carolyn 
Mangelsdorf (right), set up 
Emanon's ice cream break. 
Members of Lafferty House 
(center), took axes to their 
house. Quips and Cranks 
business manager Lori 
Boardman (far right), makes 
out an invoice to pay the 
publisher. 



Comptroller's Office, a move which will hopefully eliminate 
the problem of embezzlement by students. Yet, even if the 
Business Office oversees the accounts, students can still 
easily take money. As Currie admits, "I can't really tell 
some of the things you send in, but I do know that the 
annual does take pictures." Student business managers 
remain vulnerable to the temptation of stealing. The 
manager simply can claim to have paid for a purchase and 
then has the Comptroller's Office make him or her out a 
personal check, explains yearbook manager Lori Boardman. 

Responsibility, either for money or property, places a 
burden on students that some cannot handle. Just as 
several students succumbed to stealing, so did members of 
Lafferty House vandalize their college-owned house. As 
Housing Director Bill Bolding wrote, "The unfortunate 
incident in Lafferty House following the house inspections 
requires me to emphasize your responsibility for the houses 
you have rented." Escaping serious punishment, those 
students involved in the vandalism were allowed to 
graduate. The College gives students adult responsibilities, 
but often punishes them as children for destructice actions. 
Both students and administration need to take the code 
more seriously. ■ 

m i 




96 Organizations 




Organizations 97 



II work and no play ..." So goes the old adage, often a particularly apt warning for th« 
Davidson student. Even the powers that be show their 
concern by closing the library at 6:00 on Saturday evenings. But 
with the college's social center temporarily off limits, where is the 
fun loving student to go? The town of Davidson has little to offer 
in the way of nightlife. So at Davidson, provisions for social and 
cultural events must come from the students themselves. To this 
end, the College Union and Patterson Court generally offer a wide 
variety of entertainments for the class weary. 

The Union usually takes the lead with regards to planning, 

-n — according to president Ann Parker. "We're pretty proud of the fact 

that 70% of what is published in the Union calander is sponsored 
by the Union." Unfortunately, Ann claims, the two biggest 
coordinators of events seldom cooperate when it comes to 
programming, resulting in either very busy or very bare weekends. 
Nevertheless, both the Union and Patterson Court are vital to the 
social life of the college. PAX member Warren Overbey cites the 
ability to draw individuals into groups as the Court's main 
contribution. If it became defunct for any reason, he feels "socially it 
would be disastrous. Where would people go?" ■ 




Patterson Court and the Union 
have for many years peacefully 
coexisted in the College's social 
life. Whether or not the Commons 
can join the picture without 
upsetting an already precarious 
situation remains to be seen. 
Freshmen enjoy the facility 
(top left), which sported the 
campus' most elaborate yuletide 



decor. The Union continues to 
provide a crowded calender of 
events, including weekly discos 
such as this international affair 
with DJs Pam Hawkins and Terry 
Greiner (bottom left). Craig 
White (center left), enjoys beer 
as served up by 900 Room 
regulars Jean Soracco and Geoff 
Andrews (top right). Besides 





these weekly activities, the 
Union works with the court to 
coordinate big weekends. During 
Homecoming, Rob Singleton joins 
in the Union's Highland Games 
(bottom right), while Patterson 
Court furnishes the Homecoming 
Court (ctr right). Below, Chuck 
Hasty testifies to the continuing 
popularity of Court activities. 



IHU 



] M. r 



/ 



W/i 




Patterson Court, Union, The Arts 



Academic Burnout: 
A Case Study 




100 Academic Burnout 




Study nausea 
takes its toll 

At some point in every 
student's life, he or she 
becomes victim to an 
exhaustion so severe that 
some never recover. 
Trying to take three lab 
courses in one term turns 
David Marcus (bottom 
left) into a studying 
zombie. After a term of 
covering everything from 
Beowulf to Faulkner, Jeff 
Hamilton (top left), no 
longer responds to any 
stimuli. Evenings are the 
worst time of day. for now 
only the fittest or most 
terrified survive. Charlie 
Tiches (left), plunges 
frantically into his rough 
draft, as John Leiner 
(top), succumbs to sleep. 



Academic Burnout 101 



Blowing Off Steam 



"We're mad as hell 
and we won't take it 
anymore!" These words 
seem to echo both the 
thoughts and actions of 
many a Davidson 
student who has had 
just a little too much of 
the "Davidson 
Experience." 

"Scream therapy" 
seems to work well for 
fourth Rich. Each 
Monday and Thursday 
at 10:00 P.M. Lynn 
Logan and hallmates 
Anne Morgan and Tricia 
Drake tune up for what 
they call their "Primal 
Scream." They find that 
a good five minutes of 
serious screeching is a 
wonderful cure for what 
"ails" them. "I think 
about breaking 
windows," says 
sophomore Bev Hart, 
"but I've never done it. 
Usually what I do is go 
for long walks or tear 
Dr. Pepper cans to 
shreds." Sophomore 
Paul Fry is known to 
turn up the stereo and 
play some air guitar 
when things get bad. 

Senior Michael Kehs 
refuses to let pressure 
upset his routine; even 
in the tightest of 
moments Mike knows 
his priorities. "I feel my 
fish first," he says. 
"Fish must be fed if I'm 
in a good mood or not. 
Then," he continues, "I 
buy beer."H 



102 Blowing Off Steam 




Total release — that's the object of these 
folks! Leslie Bryan (left) "lets it all go" to the 
oompahs of the 900 Room's German night. 
Yet drink and dance are not the only means 
of relaxing inhibitions; sports also rank high on 
the totem pole. (Clockwise from center) 
President Sam Spencer releases his 
frustrations with an "over-Thorn Cartmill's- 
head" smash, and a weary Wildcat waters 



down after a strenuous game of soccer. Both 
the College Union and fraternities offer a 
variety of games and contests in which 
students can "express" themselves. Doug 
Ammar (bottom right) pigs out on pancakes 
while participating in the Union Cafe's 
pancake-eating contest, and Leon Mason 
supports the Kenya Foundation while abusing 
Pika's "dream" car. 




Main street 
residents up in 
arms over student 
neighbors 

Connie Terry and Security 
Patrol Henry Cook 
(bottom right), seem 
pleased with the conduct 
of the crowd (top right), 
listening to the Chairman 
of the Board Band at the 
SPE house on North Main 
Street. Local residents, 
however, were disturbed 
not only by the loud noise 
but also by the condition 
of perimeter houses' 
porches. In response, the 
Women's Center 
sponsored a contest in 
which Dan Harkins put 
together the most creative 
entry (top left). To help 
the community, Fiji 
member Dale Culpepper 
(center left), takes blood 
pressure outside Piedmont 
Bank, while Robbie 
Singleton (below), helps 
Davidson youths with their 
bikes during Town Day. 



104 College 





Davidson: 
A College and 
A Community 

To attend Davidson College implies that a student 
becomes both a member ot the College and the community. 
In spite of beneficial community relations in the past. 
problems arose this year as local residents protested both 
the noise levels of student parties, especially in off-campus 
houses, and he appearance of the perimeter houses along 
North Main Street. 

Starting with the Chairman of the Board party at the Sig 
Ep house, the community as a whole questioned the decibel 
level that it should have to tolerate from a neighbor. Sig Ep 
President Frank Clark notified Mayor Nancy MacCormac as 
well as the Davidson police prior to the party, and neither 
the mayor nor the police foresaw any problems as a result of 
the afternoon celebration. In retrospect, Clark admitted that 
the fraternity "would probably not do anything like that 
again." Speaking for local residents, Professor Charlie Lloyd 
complained ardently about the intolerable rock music from 
the party and claimed it was "a serious threat, not just to 
the old grownups like me, but to the hearing of the young 
people." To deal with the problems, Mayor MacCormac held 
several noise ordinance meetings to decide times and decibel 
levels for such parties. According to student representative 
Joe Ford, the new ordinance dictates that from 8 a.m. to 11 
p.m. on Sunday through Thursday and from 8 a.m. to 1 a.m 
on Friday and Saturday, the decibel level will be restricted to 
70. The ordinance, however, contains numerous grey areas, 
such as from where the noise level readings should be taken. 
Ford, Clark and Professor Lloyd all believed that the 
ordinance was not necessary; instead, the residents and the 
students need to become more aware and respectful of each 
other. 

Another source of controversy centered around the porch 
furniture of several off-campus houses. Most of this furniture 
was in poor condition; in addition, members of Grey House 
had placed several pieces on their second floor roof. Again, 
local residents claimed this furniture was an eyesore and 
wanted it promptly removed. Housing Director Bill Bolding 
sent notices to Grey, Harding, Lafferty, and Julia Johnson 
House as well as to Martin Manor. Without proper warning, 
Bolding then had the remaining furniture removed, a move 
which agitated house members. As in the first case, the 
students and community members needed better 
communication to handle the problem. 

Not all community relations are quite so antagonistic. 
Community Center Director Cathy Booze uses many student 
volunteers in recreation programs. The College Y-Corps helps 
tutor elementary children and also contributed $300 for a 
baseball field backstop. Other students participated in 
Davidson's Town Day by providing refreshments, playing 
music and setting up games. College students can get along 
with and be a part of the Davidson community. With mutual 
consideration for one another, the community can operate as 
a whole. ■ 



Community 105 



Charlotte's skyline (upper left), pierced by the NCNB, First Union Tower, and 
Wachovia Center, attracts Davidson students with its lure of theaters, 
restaurants, and nightclubs. But students do not always need to get away 
"physically". Fred Erhman (center) seeks escape through yoga; Scott Smith 
manages to forget Davidson while still in its midst; and Martha Nelson 
(bottom left) realizes that "home" is just a phone call away, (far right) Randy 
Stroud, representative of those who desire a more invigorating escape, 
demonstrates his skiing expertise on the slopes of Sugar. 




Getting Awa^ 



It's bound to happen sometime. You have just 
broken your third graduated cylinder, you have 
overshot your endpoint (again), and your Master 
Charge is way overdue. There is only one solution 
— "escape." 

At this point, where is not as important as when: 
it has to be now, when you have neither the time 
nor the money nor the energy. The campus itself 
can offer a convenient refuge — a quick run 
through the cross country course or a sleeping 
bag spread beneath the stars is often enough to 
quiet the mind and the nerves. "I go to the grave 
yard," says junior Mike Goode. "Dead people 
don't bother me. They don't complain about 
studying." Other students find that soft music, a 
bottle of wine, and good company can take them 
as far away as they need to go. 

Others, however, must hit the open road. 1-77 is 
kept busy with carloads headed for a night of 
excitement in the nearby "big city." Granted, 



Charlotte is not the "Big Apple" — perhaps not 
even the little Apple, but it does hold its 
attractions. Students frequent Eastland Mall, Dixie 
Electric Company, or the Double Door, depending 
on the desired music and the desired "crowd." 

Sometimes even Charlotte is too close to home 
and only a "real" trip will do. Some are 
preplanned such as the Pike bus trips to Boone, 
where they "head for the mountains" in more 
ways than one, but some are unexpected. Many a 
fraternity pledge has ended up "getting away" 
whether he has needed to or not. 

For those verging on insanity, a term or even a 
year away may be the only saving grace. "It's the 
best think I ever did in my life," says sophomore 
Sue Graves of her term in Beaufort. "Take 
advantage of it. You come back a different person, 
with a completely different perspective." and 
that's the purpose of going away, isn't it? To 
come back.H 




It's college — 
take it and 
leave it 

The process begins in the 
fall and seems to recur at 
every break. Struggling to 
help his freshman 
daughter into Richardson, 
a father (top center), pulls 
a suitcase from their car. 
What poor dad did not 
realize occurs as Jerry 
Grubba (right), breaks 
loose at a party and Bob 
Finch (bottom center), 
chugs a pitcher of beer in 
the interim of vacations. 
John Verdi (far right) does 
not look back while he 
packs off conservatively 
for summer break. 



108 Suitcase College 



Davidson: Suitcase 

College 
Or Party School? 




"If you simply had to choose, would you describe 
Davidson as a party school or suitcase college? In spite ot 
(lying accusations, invariably comes the replay: "Neither!" 
Dean Will Terry sees the advent of women on campus as 
diminishing the "suitcase college" image. The availability of 
alcohol on campus since the late sixties and coeds since the 
early seventies persent the college with a better context from 
which to plan activities, particularly through the Union and 
Patterson Court. As often as not, it is the suitcases which 
arrive on Friday and leave the following Sunday. But that's 
another story altogether; just ask any coed. 

Some professors feel that Davidson is gaining a "party 
school" image, particularly due to the increasing number of 
parties and discos during the week. Dr. David Shi has 
noticed that campus partying reduces class attendance the 
morning after — especially in the spring. Other professors 
decry the laxity of Friday classes in particular. But what 
would Thursday night studying be without a disco break in 
the 900 Room? True, emphasis seems to have shifted from 
partying on Friday and Saturday to Thursday and Friday, but 
a practical reason lies behind this. Bands are much cheaper 



on weeknights In an effort to save mom . 
a few prime study hours Can we not win' 

Another side to this story exists One alumn • 
sadly on the large number of students he had se«?r 
in the library on Spring Frolics weekend. When he was here, 
he remembered, "the library wasn't even open!" during 
special social times From this point of view, parties aren't 
the only things keeping students on campus these days — 
studies have a lot to do with it as well. 

Dean Terry has noticed an increase in the number of 
"small, more intimate parties, both on the court and in the 
dorms." From freshman hall parties to patio parties on Duke 
to the annual "Bob and Parks" party-hearty, Dean Terry has 
a point. Students seem to mellow a bit with each year at 
Davidson, finding loud band parties less appealing than a 
table in the 900 Room or drinks in the kitchen with forever- 
friends. 

So is Davidson a party school? A suitcase college? Both 
or neither? It's up to the individual. Some, like sophomore 
Gary Schenk, make the best of both worlds: "We party on 
Thursday night and pack up on Friday!" ■ 




Party School 109 



Sometimes it's reassuring to realize that you 
are not fighting the academic and social 
pressures alone. (Clockwise from left) During 
Homecoming's half time cheerleader Mamie Crosby 
gets support from fan, Ellis Tinsley. The team, 
too, requires player affinity; this is partly the 
goal of preseason training. Hand walking hall 
counselors Danny Waddill and Mike Goode prove 
that even the library can be fun with friends. 



Most upperclassmen affiliate themselves with some 
group, be it a frat or an eating house. Below 
right, Fiji's Rob Gillison, Jim Cheek, and Andy 
Brown collaborate tc produce winning college bowl 
results. Freshmen, however, are excluded from 
Patterson Court membership. Not to worry ... the 
freshman hall has an identity of its own, 
demonstrated here by First Belk Center West's 
entry in orientation's lake regatta. 




Sticking Together. 




There are so few 
people here, I feel guilty 
when I don't know 
someone in my class." 
Even though Davidson 
has only 1,414 
students, we can't 
expect to know 
everyone. You find a 
group with whom you 
feel comfortable and 
then you stick together. 

The interesting thing 
about living at Davidson 
occurs on the freshman 
halls. Here friendships 
develop that usually 
remain long after senior 
year. Seniors Stewart 
Tabb, Claire Abernathy, 
Phoebe Forio, and Sally 
Sharp have gathered 
around the same table 
in the Snackbar since 
freshman year. The 
table is a legacy, and 
as Sally explains, "we're 
second generation." 

Teams, organizations, 
fraternities and eating 
houses also foster 
longlasting friendships. 
Fiji John Odell remarks, 
"The brotherhood thing 
is deried but it's as 
good a concept as any 
to describe the common 
bond." Perimeter 
housing allows 
upperclassmen to get to 
know a smaller group of 
their friends better. 
"With your good 
friends." says Harding 
House resident Patty 
Bates, "you know you 
are not alone. "■ 



Sticking Together 1 1 1 



With the Advent of the Commons, 
Patterson Court Faces Competition 



JZommonsCommonsCommonsCommonsCa. 



Dining at the new Commons (far right), turned out to be 
more than just an eating experience. In March, Charlotte's 
own Cafe Eugene put on a French dinner, complete with 
lamb, fish in white sauce, pastries and several types of 
wine. Deborah Peters (below), serves coffee to a satisfied 
group of diners, as Ed Trumbull and Whit Wampler (right), 
enjoy their meal in a remote corner of the dining area. Even 
the regular fare at the commons pleased Suzy Hohman, 
Martha Newson and Shirin Hanafi (bottom right), who fill up 
on a spuds and salad dinner. 





112 Patterson Court 



1981 brought a (ace lift to Patterson Court. Richards and 
Bailey were hauled away and the Commons arose. Although 
its primary purpose was to provide cafeteria services for 
freshmen, the Commons soon attracted upperclassmen. 
Never before had an option existed; after freshman year, one 
either ate on Patterson Court or "independent." Richards 
and Bailey certainly couldn't handle more than the freshman 
class and, to be honest, not many upperclassmen could 
handle Richards and Bailey. 

Now Davidson, just like State U., has a large cafeteria. But 
does the success of the Commons necessarily mean failure 
to Patterson Court? A few of the houses stood on financially 
shaky ground before the Commons and now must consider 
closing. Dean Terry advocated a minimum membership of 60 
students for each house to be eligible for opening in the fall 
of 1982. Houses are desperately trying to deter students 
from switching to the Commons by enforcing a $40 "drop- 
out" fine and the Patterson Court Council is considering the 
adoption of an increase, a fine as high as one-third of the 
board bill. 

Nevertheless, students continue to switch. Roger Herbert, 
one of several football players who eats at the Commons, 
explained, "During football season, I easily drop 20 pounds 
without the right food. At the Commons I have hot 
breakfasts, unlimited seconds, and milk at every meal." 



Other people, like Beth Toler, switched because the 
Commons has a more flexible eating schedule. "I worked in 
the Chemistry Building unti 6:00 p.m., and they sure didn't 
hold supper for me at ATO!" The daily soup and salad bar 
appeals to weight-conscious girls, and everyone wants to try 
the "make-your-own" waffles, creamy milkshakes, and 
piping-hot doughnuts When 20 per cent of the freshmen 
class elected to remain at the Commons rather than choose 
an eating house, the Court had to review its own situation 

Small-scale eating is not the most economical or efficient, 
but something must be said in defense of the "family" 
atmosphere. Frazier Worth, in an April 9. 1982 letter to the 
editor of the Davidsonian. advocates the "chances for 
privacy and responsibility" and contends that "the eating 
houses foster involvement and help to round out what is 
often a one dimensional Davidson lifestyle." 

Surprisingly, many court members view the advent of the 
Commons in a positive light. Ben Oldham, SAE, sums up the 
beneficial impact of the Commons: "The Commons brings 
competition to the court." Already houses are embarking on 
self-improvements such as new furniture, unique party ideas, 
an.d higher quality food. Perhaps the end of Patterson Court 
is not near at hand; strong houses will continue to operate, 
attracting a majority of upperclassmen. ■ 




Patterson Court 113 



The Ghosts of 
Patterson Court 

Past 




1982 will go down in Davidson history as the year that 
ARA's Richards House and Bailey House became a memory. 
Only a handful still remember the friendly atmosphere, the 
posh decor and, of course, the renowned cuisine of the 
houses. But the ghosts of Davidson's past still linger on to 
haunt the campus. The old buildings that housed what used 
to be Richards and Bailey stand even to their memory, in 
slightly rattled condition and stark emptiness, but not for 
long. The fall of 1982 will see the houses filled with new 
occupants and new life. 

According to Dean of Students Will Terry, Bailey House, 
relocated between F & M and ETC, will become Warner Hall, 
a new all-women's eating house. Richards, now located 
between KA and Rusk, will be the new house for the Black 
Student Coalition (BSC). 

Sophomores Jane Alexanian, Kathy Kooken, and Anne 
Rollins made the proposal for the all-women's eating club to 
the Council on Campus and Religious Life on October 1, 
1981. The three women felt that the need for an all-women's 
eating house was evidenced by the fact that at the time of 
the proposal Rusk House was operating at full capacity, 
serving 85 women, and had 43 more on the waiting list. Of 
83 freshmen women surveyed, 59 signed a petition indicating 
their interest in joining an all women's eating club. 



WARNER HALL: (first row) 
Martha Nelson, Mimi Mauze, 
Elena Paul, Stephanie Bensinger, 
Kitty Dudley, Susan Campbell. 
Elizabeth Laughlin, Lorelei Keif. 
Vickie Neale. Beth Mack, Mary 
Tabb. Keg Carter. Elizabeth 
Hargrove, (second row) Lauren 
Smith. Meg Surratt. Lisa Cash, 
Annie Proges, Elizabeth Brooks, 
Mandy Dotson. Susan Kann, 
Laura Tumburke. Sarah Hart, 
Becca Bates, Kristin Hills, Laura 
Taft, Laura Helmus, Cari 
Shulman, Heather Jamison, Mary 
Griffin, Ellen Papadeas, Anne 
Keith, Alva Moore, (last row) 
Ellen Rowe, Anne Rollins, Ross 
Thayer, Jeanne Webb, Sarah 
Patterson, Lisa Thomas, Janet 
Morris. Jane Alexanian, Connie 
Kyle. Elizabeth Elkin, Anne 
Miano, Lee White, Claire Groves, 
Allison Harper, Sarah Speed, 
Sarah Hall. Shelia Can. (not 
pictured) Kathleen Anderson, 
Mary Carpenter, Susan Fore, 
Meg Kimbirl, Kathy Kooken. 
Eleanor Knobloch, Elizabeth 
White. 




114 Patterson Court 



The approval for the house came in February of 1982, and 
the women, headed by Connie Kyle, had decided to name 
the house after Dr. Warner Hall. Dr Hall, a Davidson trustee 
for 28 years, is currently a senior associate in the Office of 
Development at Davidson. Connie stated, "We were all really 
excited about it because it will be exactly ten years since 
they let women into Davidson when Warner Hall opens its 
doors. It makes it a little more special." 

The approval for Richards House to be given to the BSC 
did not come until late in May. The BSC sought a larger 
house than the one they had on Jackson Court bcause the 
organization had grown to about 50 members. According to 
the BSC president Anne Elliott, they also felt that a house on 
Patterson Court would encourage more students to attend 
their functions, as the court lies closer to the main part of 
campus. Elliott said, "I'm really excited about having the 
house. I realize that President Spencer was hard pressed to 
choose between us and housing, which is a very big problem 
on campus. We think that it's very important to have the 
Coalition in the center of social activities and we are very 
thankful that president Spencer supports this viewpoint." 

Patterson Court has seen enormous changes since 1981. 
effectively expanding to meet the changing needs of 
Davidson's student body. The ghosts of Patterson Court past 
now house the hopes for her future. ■ 



WarnerHallWarnerHallWarnerHallWarnerHa- 




After Bailey House (top left), was moved to its new location 
on the Court, the girls from Warner Hall got busy getting the 
house ready to open in the fall. Kristine Hills, Connie Kyle, 
Anne Rollins, and Kitty Dudley (below), choose the music at 
a disco sponsored by Warner Hall. With the money from the 
disco, the girls put on a cruise party to celebrate the house 
opening. Holding champagne, Martha Nelson and Gary 
Schenk (left), toast to Warner Hall's success. 




Patterson Court 1 15 



ATOATOATOATOATOATOATOATOATOATOA. 



MO 



A TO, a better way for a better America. With this motto in 
mind, members of ATO, led by John Shaw (right) protect 
their house from violent Phi Delts. In a valiant attempt, 
Charlie Lovett and friends (top center) work around the clock 
to stop the autumnal equinox. To commemorate Pearl 
Harbor, Anne Goodwin (far right), along with a cast from 
A TO, recreate this historic event on the steps of Chambers. 
More entertaining than the Pearl Harbor acting was the 
music of John Hartman and Sue Graves (below), who 
participate in Davidson's Town Day. Finally Ivy Goodman 
and John Hartman (bottom center), simply sit and stand 
around, not really doing a thing. 





116 Patterson Court 




A TO: (nghtside up) John Krotchko. Doug Vass. Bary Barrel (feet), Gary Sladcik. Mark Phillips (first row) 
Debby Williams. Ant Goode. Eddie Aziz. John Hartman. Cynthia Briscoe. Dick Barber. Ivy Goodman. Brian 
Butler. Lindsey Biddle. Alice Musick. Jon Lowry (feet), (second row) Danny Armistad. Randy Matthews, i 
Graves. Anne Goodwin. Dorothy Grahm. Charlie Lovett. Elizabeth Bazell. Brad Simpson. Joanna Hunt 
Alessandro Vilelh. Linda Hulbert. Stewart MacWilliam. Jeff Herrm. David Teer (back there) Robert T f 
Voorhis. Will Donavan. Kevin McDans. Melissa McManis. Bill Bankhead. Bill Crone. John Eglin. Whit Wampler. 
Ralph Lasley. Karen Baldwin, John Lusk. Debbie Eisenbise. Mary Ann Gelly. Stephanie Bruck. Jame: 
Rozzelle. Frazier Worth 



Patterson Court 117 




EMANON: (firs! row) Albert Nester, Richard Dubose. Lisa Sloan. Joe Roberts. George Webster. John Robbins. 
Carole Jolly. Caroline Boudreau. (second row) Bruce Wallace (non-member), Roy Fuller. John Chung. Kathryn 
Murray. Gina Overcash. Lucy Marshall. Lynn Powell. Stephanie Moftett. Cathy Hodges, (thrid row) Aubry Humphries. 
Dale Withrow, Hope King. Craig Rice. Doug Austin. Carolyn Mangelsdorl. Jane Redd. Lisa Herrard. Ellen Gyauch. 
Elizabeth Smiley, (last row) Erie Kaufman. Wilson Sofley. Mike Graham, Dennis Swearengin, Lance Stokes, Greg 
Kaufman, Karl Pfeffercorn, Bob Buchanan. Bruce West. Dan Harkins. Brad Mullis, Jack Smith. Mark Hartwick. John 
Glance, Jim Brown, Van Beck, Mitzi Short, Adelyn Lutz, John Rees, Linda Cruciani. 



118 Patterson Court 



-EmanonEmanonEmanonEmanonEmanon. 




Eating at Emanon always proved to be an experience one 
could not soon forget. A smiling gargoyle /senior Dan Harkins 
(left), greets visitors and members as they come up the path, 
while Joe Roberts and Van Beck (top center), check ID's at 
the door. If allowed to enter, the lucky student soon gets to 
taste the meals prepared by Odessa Hunsucker (below left), 
Emanon 's wonderful cook. Before returning to the library, 
Wilson Sofley, (far left), plays foosball in the basement. 
Albert Nester (below), celebrates the rise of punk rock at a 
less interesting Emanon band party. 



Patterson Court 119 




ETC: (first row) Jim Brown, 
Sandra Davis, Dave Barnes, 
Ralph Taylor, Eric Weiss, Brent 
Hilleary, Frank Clark, Brad 
Perkins, Wes Bean, (second row) 
Ken Howarth, Brian Nash, Willie 
David, Jane Harper, Paul Fry, 
Eric Hill, Tom Roth, Steve 
Lawrence, Cambria Melton, 
Susan Stutts. Mike Blake, Phil 
Harry, Mike Frankhouser, Nancy 
Bondurant. (third row) David 
Emory, Andrea Miller, Dave 
Lincoln, Cliff Savage, Mark 
Hammond, Bryan Sloan, Alan 
Fields, Tim Johnston, David 
Hutchinson, David Graybeal. (last 
row) Carlton Clinkscales, Barry 
Mack, Bob Whalen, Eric Fink, 
Hunter Monroe, Boe Young, 
Dave Saston, Greg Sloop, 
Deepak Sawhney, Jeff Knudson. 
Ricky Watson. 




120 Patterson Court 



£tcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcEtcE_ 



The life of ETC members begins at 5 00 p.m. Mark 
Hammond (below), relaxes with a bottle of cheap American 
wine before dinner. On the other hand. Jeff Wright (bottom 
center), enjoys his pre-dinner hours practicing drills with the 
ROTC. After dinner. Ralph Taylor (far left) reminisces over 
the day, too full to do anything else but pat his dog Finally, 
in anticipation of the next day's review. Brent Hilleary (left), 
falls asleep, clutching the infamous SPE drawer of previous 
tests. 




Patterson Court 121 



J&MF&MF&MF&MF&MF&MF&MF&MF&ME- 



F & M members always discover or create the occasion to 
celebrate. Turning 22 found Johnnie Leazer (below), the 
victim of Tom Leonard and friends' plan to ditch the birthday 
boy into a creek. In a more voluntary manner, Andrea Geyer, 
Lucy Phillips and Bryan Zielinski (right), enjoy the first stages 
of intoxication, while Andy Brown, Rob Gillison and Jim 
Cheek (far right), clearly enter the final stage. Finding a 
moment away from the crowd, Jim Cheek and Melissa 
McKeithen (bottom center), seriously discuss impending 
reviews. 




122 Patterson Court 



"Hattie's Night" 
Thrives Again 



Despite last year's tragic shooting, "Hattie's Night" ft 
on as usual this year Robert Shackleford pleaded guilty to 
the shooting ot junior Joe Leman at the 12 March 1981 
"Hattie's Night" party and received a seven year suspended 
sentence As a result ot the 1981 incident, the Davidson 
College Security Force carefully checked ID'S at this year's 
celebration To reduce the number of non-college guests, F 
& M did not announce "Hattie's Night" until two days prior 
to the date of the party F & M also encouraged people to 
walk, not drive to the house, and once there, to stay within 
the confines of the property Although slightly more subdued 
than normal, "Hattie's Night" returned to its former 
reputation of a safe place to become inebriated ■ 





F & M (Iront) Jim Cheek. Jim 
Troulman. (first row) Jim 
Morgan. Paul Ray. Crystal 
Williams. Betsy Holton. Cathy 
Cantwell. Eric Long. Loy 
Thorton. Sarah Moody, Dunbar 
Ivy. Caroline Massey. Bob 
Hopkins, Bryan Zielmski. Bob 
Tate (second row) Johnny 
Edwards. Chuck Elyea. Dick Lee. 
Dave Shoemaker. Julie 
Vanderpool, Melissa McKeithen. 
Dave Riopel. Jett Tilbury. Joe 
Jaworski. John Hendnx. Dave 
West. Jay Toslosky. John Van 
Dell. Randy Stroud. Lucy Phillips 
(third row) Lisa Buckley. Mable 
Torrence. Fannie Brandon. Scott 
Haight. Rich Davis. Brenda 
Baker. Julie Abrams. Cathy 
Morell. Heather McCormack. 
Betsy Blake. Beverly Hart. Doug 
Ammar, Sarah Ross. John Odell. 
Andy Brown. Bob Fine' 
Attar. Rip Singer. Cathy Munger 
(last row) Ken Lewis. Jon 
Norwood. Dave Hall. Renee 
Herlong, Tom Leonard. Johnnie 
Leazer. Dale Carte: Jett Kistler. 
Jerry Cook. Paul Schultz. Dave 
Earnhardt 



Patterson Court 123 




3k- 



/ 



FIJI: (first row) Greg Thompson, Roy Martin, Mark Whelan. John Odell. Paul Ray, Eric Long. Joe Jaworski, Dick 
Lee, Bryan Zielinski and Z pup, Dave Hessler. (second row) Mike Murphy, Andy Scott, Paul Schulz, Doug 
Ammar, Daniel Ettedgui. Mike Kehs, Johnnie Leazer, Jon Norwood, Bill Hall, Lance Lasnes, Dave Hall, Johnny 
Edwards, Dixie Kimsey, Jeff Mann, (third row) Tom Schilling, John Teague, Bob Tate, Dunbar Ivy, Jay Toslosky, 
Rich Davis. Dave "Otis" Rowe, Mark Gillespy. Trey Thies, Bob Hopkins, Scott Haight, Tom Hissam, Kevin Attar, 
John Van Dell, (back) Bill Swift, Bob Finch, Dale Culpepper, Hans Jensen, Chuck Elyea, Mark Steiner, Dave 
Shoemaker, Dave West. John Toler. Dave Earnhardt, Jeff Tilbury, John Hendrix. Fred Ehrman, Carl Anderson, 
Randy Stroud, Bill Barber, Ken Lewis, Jeff Holland, Roger Herbert. Dale Carter, John Verdi, Mike Schremmer. 
Jerry Cook, Bob Trobich, Jim Morgan, Rob Gillison. 



124 Patterson Court 



J^ijiFljlFljlFijiFijiFljiFijiFijiFijiFijiFijiFijiFijiFij_ 




Acting out their various fantasies amidst kegs of beer, Fiji 
members spent another year having a good time. Eric Long 
and John Odell (top left), revel in a shower of brew outside. 
Even though not in the movies, Dave Riopel (center), and 
Mark Gillespy (left), imitate their favorite screen stars, Alex 
from Clockwork Orange and Tarzan. At times, few females 
atttended band parties, but the Fijis still came through, as 
the happy couples, Bob Finch and Wade Anderson (bottom 
left), and Kevin Attar and Andy Brown (below), affectionately 
demonstrate. 



V 




\ 



it 



J 






XAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKAKA/C 



Despite widespread rumours, the KAs are not just a bunch 
of Southern gentlemen, although Greg Murphy and Chuck 
Lampley (far right), sometimes indulge in a good, clean 
game of hand wrestling, Marc Fields and Charles Douglas 
(below), engage in more unusual behavior. Again displaying 
the two different sides of a KA, Shannon Anderson relaxes in 
the arms of Scott Eblin (right), during the KA Spring 
Weekend Barn Dance, while Joe Ford (bottom center), 
enjoys an equally fulfilling form of entertainment downstairs 
in the basement. 





126 Patterson Court 





KA: (first row) Randy Sellers. 
Malcolm Rogers. Ricky Dommick. 
Tony Broyles. Joe Ford. Steve 
Shelby. Alec Driskill. Nick Viest. 
Charles Douglas. Russ Williams. 
Eric Crum (second row) Bert 
Mobley. George Booth. Tom 
Ratch/ord. Andy Zoutewelle. 
Chris Culp. Sanders Dallas. 
Danny Sappenfield. Thomas 
Bates. Jim Crowe. Scott Eblin, 
Alex McCallie. Chip Legerton. 
Nevms Todd. Hill Stockton (third 
row) Bill Cobb. Chip Fishback. 
Bill Satterwhite. Jeff McSwam. 
Robbie Brannen. Carl Rist. Scott 
Redding. Curtis Northrup. Chris 
Tiernan. Bobby Silver. Gordon 
Turnbull. William Shreve. Allen 
Lazenby (fourth row) Paul 
Griffith. Scott Beaver. Philip 
Crowder. Tom Walker. Walt 
Dean. Sambo Hay. George 
Thompson. Mark Nottingham. 
Clark Carter. Scott Smith. John 
Bnedenstine. Guyler Calton. 
Chuck Hasty. Bill Hay. Danny 
Waddill. Tom McKean, Sam 
Sommers. Brian Hamilton. Ellis 
Tinsley. Tom Grimes. Walker 
Douglas 



Patterson Court 127 



PAXPAXPAXPAXPAXPAXPAXPAXPAXPA. 



Many of PAX's activities revolve around the fine arts of 
dining and dancing. Steve Skelton (below) fixes yet another 
mixed drink, while Chef Russell Snipes (far right), attempts to 
fix a gourmet dinner, hopefully better tasting than his 
grimace indicates. Later in the evening, Steve Lewis, Cheryl 
Soderstrom, Bryan Collins, and Janet Lindsley (right), cuddle 
together on the couch. During a more formal occasion at the 
Commons, Caryn Hoskins and Warren Overbey (bottom 
center), pause between dances. 




PAX: (first row) Harriet Gaston, 
Mike Alien. Debbie Hayes, Mike 
Mason, Elizabeth Flanders, Holly 
Spannuth, Sloan Warner, Howard 
Browne, Marvin Overby, Julie 
Cheek, (second row) Lauren Van 
Metre, Cheryl Soderstrom, Jeb 
Benedict, Catherine Finegan, Jim 
Trotter, Chris Gunn, Cheryl 
Brooks, Mills Antley, Greg 
Kucera. (third row) Kimberly 
Weiss, Cindy Clark, Gene Griggs, 
Ellen Field, Deborah Shretter, 
Brad Cors, Russ Snipes. Janet 
Lindsley, Caryn Hoskins, Warren 
Overby. (fourth row) Beth 
Gerken, John McDonald, Chris 
Woods. Suzie Kord, Sharon 
Bryant. Drew Davis, David Lee, 
Mike Healy, Jennifer Spencer. 
Dave Boone, Drew Wells, (last 
row) Jim Hooten, Walter Lee, 
Sue Jenney, Stephen Skelton, 
Lee McCormick, Tom Biggs, 
Betsy Brice, Steve Lewis. Bryan 
Collins, Jim Reese. 



128 Patterson Court 




Patterson Court 129 



If John Belushi Were To Dine 
With The Delts And Other Insights 



J>hiDeltPhiDeltPhiDeltPhiDeltPhiDeltPhiDe. 



In Greek, Phi Delt translates as "Fun Guys, " and indeed, this 
house lives up to its name. Dana Bolton (below), throws 
horseshoes for the fraternity during Greek Week. At the Air 
Guitar Contest, Melis Nicolades with date David Huie 
(center), watch the contestants emulate rock stars minus any 
instruments. During the Spring Frolics concert, Linda Boone 
and Mark Hartman (far right), listen to a real Southern Rock 
Band, who preferred to play with their instruments. 






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130 Patterson Court 




Phi Delta The la. The name conjures up images of Animal 
House, with big, crude guys who throw food and break 
things Freshman girls, among the numerous bits of "advice" 
they receive in their first few weeks, hear that they shouldn't 
go to a Phi Delt party without a whip and a chair. One could 
be led to believe that Phi Delts eat little girls. Well, they 
certainly aren't that bad Nevertheless, the news last spring 
that Phi Delta Theta sought female members came as a 
surprise to many. How would girls fare eating dinner with the 
Delts? 

Ten girls signed up for the house, and although none 
stayed past winter term, they enjoyed the experience. 
Sophomore Margaret Ervin comments, "I really had a good 
time doing it." It seems that the Phi Delts enjoyed the girls 
also. Senior Billy Price found that the house didn't change at 
all because of its female members, and he liked having them 
around. "The guys are really nice," says Margaret, "IT was 
like sitting around with a lot of brothers." Crudeness did not 



become a problem. "There was no blatant except 
girls," says junior Bill McFayden, "but they knew .•. 
were getting into " Margaret found pranks such as 
occasional food fights funny. 

The question remains, of course, as to why none of the 
girls lasted longer than two terms "Evidently we weren't very 
good hosts." quips Bill, the Phi Delts' president Actually, the 
problem was centered around finances and food. "I just got 
tired of the same fried foods all the time," explains Margaret 
This was the major complaint; Bill McFayden agrees. "We 
don't eat much lettuce." Now that they've dropped out. 
most of the girls still keep in touch, dropping by to talk and 
attending parties. With the girls gone and membership for 
next year built up, the Phi Delts look forward to having an 
all-male house again. Bill says. "If it became necessary, I 
would vote to have girls down there again; however. I'm 
looking forward to having it all fraternity." ■ 




a 



PDT (first row) Jim Sasser. Craig Bmkley. David Weilnauer. Lance Sisco. Alan Brady. Mike lordanou. Warne 
Wayne Paymer (second row) Bill Wahl. Derek Lee. Atmire Bailey. Bill Chater. Billy Price. Micky Dn 
(third row) John Bryant. Mark Hartman. Jell Currier. Robby Thornsberry. Todd Swolford. Brent Baker. . 
Stratton Sterghos Dana Bolton. Clitt Woodard. Scott Campbell. Gary Sims (fourth row) Tommy Kirk Bob Miller. 
Tom Okel. Andy Rock. Mick Smith. Chip Lyerly. John Harden. Ken Hovel Brian Whitmire. Bob K, 
Sandy Smith 



Patterson Court 131 



J>iKAPiKAPiKAPiKAPiKAPiKAPiKAPiKAPL 



From fall to spring, the Pikes relax in the great outdoors. In 
October, Ken Kreig and Terry Wade (right), fix drinks for the 
folks during Parents' Weekend. Julie Vanderpool and Andy 
Miles (top right), along with Rick Gergoudis and Heather 
Jameson (bottom center), enjoy the cook weather at the 
Pike Camden Cup. With the advent of spring, Terry Greiner 
(below), attempts to study outside, while Richard Tapp and 
Will Abberger (bottom right), give up the books to tackle a 
game of foosball in the basement. 





PKA: (first row) Bill Seel. Not 

Pictured: Earl Adams, Mark 

Adams, Craig Allen, Dan Barker, 

Dick Bourne, Bryan Brost, James 

Bruggemann, Will Cardwell. Tom 

Cartee, John Chidsey, Tom 

Clark, Charles Coffey, Jeff 

Currier, David Donahower, Bruce 

Elliott, Hal Elliot, Ron Emerson, 

James Evens, John Ferguson, 

Eric Fitchner, David Fleming, 

Paul Flood, Rich Gergoudis, 

Warren Gould. Charles Griffith, 

Tom Mailer, Gray Hampton, Jeff 

Haney. James Harbin, Mike 

Harrold, Lacy Harwell, Jack 

Hurley, Will Kendrick. Ken Krieg, 

Bryant Knox, Mike Lockwood, 

Mike Longmire, John McGuirt, 

Alec Macbeth, Curtis Markham, 

Blair Maxwell, Hal Mohorn, Tom 

Moore. CK. Nichols. Jeff 

Nielsen, John Niepod, Mike 

Noble, Mark Oldenburg, Chuck 

Price, Steve Reardon, Forrest 

Ranson, Keith Roevell. John 

Robertson, Hunter Roddey, Eric 

Sanner, Tom Schrember, Steve 

Shield. John Stanbck, Mark 

Stanback, Steve Stine, John Stipp, Dave Stosur, Richard Strader. Gordon Stukes, Will Sullivan, Richard Tapp. Mark Thomas. Brad Uline. Terry Wade, 

Jay Warrick, Jon West, Craig White, Ed Whitesides, Todd Wiebusch, Doug Wiley, Pat Woodward, Frances Zemp. 




132 Patterson Court 




Patterson Court 133 




RUSK: (first row) Buncie Hay, Rebecca Cross, Shannon Walters, Lanier Brown, Sally Dodd. Jean Covell, Reaves 
Robinson, (second row) Kathy Stokes, Sherburne Laughlin, Laura Champlaign, Emily Davis, Gia Partain, Lize White, 
Dawna Coutant, Suzanne Dickey, Kathleen Huff, Patti Long, Agnes Stevens, (third row) Arabella Malone. June 
Greer, Jenny O'Bryant, Mary Windham, Suzie Moore, Leslie Bryant, Jessica Hunt, Nancy Stoudt. (fourth row) Alicia 
Dewey, Sindy Aycock, Meg McArn, True Davis, Susan Von Herrmann, Laura Hills, Jeanne Womack. Carol Heppner, 
Alison Hall, Peggy Blount, Jane Thompson, Elizabeth Williams. Cathey Bost, Laura Currie, Kim McAlister, Florence 
Hart, (last row) Beth Find/ay, Ann Mitchell, Mary Womble Barrringer, Becky Waters, Catherine Smith. Denise 
Ferguson, Sherri Lind, Ridgeley Medlin, Caroline Rourk, Mary Legerton. Beth Been, Laura Singleton, Marni Crosby, 
Carie Nunn. Lynne Folcher, Amy Ashworth. Caroline Scragg, Mavin Martin, Mary Elizabeth Cranford, Elizabeth 
McMillan, Barbara Boyce, Kathryn Brown. 



134 Patterson Court 



JluskRuskRuskRuskRuskRuskRuskRuskR_ 




Like most members of eating houses, Rusk women have long 
been stereotyped as lettuce-consuming, conservatives who 
date only KAs and SAEs. This year, however, Rusk House 
expanded its social activities to include other fraternities and 
eating houses. Ellen Rowe, Linda Boone and Lisa Lawler 
(bottom center), participate in a ski mixer with the Pikes who 
also voted Anne Hurt (below), their dream girl. Mavin Martin 
(far left), listens to the music at a disco sponsored by the 
new all-female eating house, Warner Hall. In a more service- 
oriented project, True Davis, Jean Covell and Agnes Stevens 
(left), serve refreshments at Davidson's Town Day. 




Patterson court 135 



3AESAESAESAESAESAESAESAESAESA. 



From the first week of school to graduation, the SAEs keep 
their house moving in high gear. Soon after school began, 
Rick Gaines, Dan Newsome, Chip Christian and Tim 
Lorenzen (center right), dress in their best clothes for a 
tacky party. In more predictable attire, the SAEs (right), 
celebrate their Senior Banquet with the music of Dancin' 
Machine. Down to shirts and shorts, Kathy Bray and Phil 
Goodnow (below), lay out at the Spring Frolics' outdoor 
concert. To carry on such events, the SAEs induct new 
pledges who must withstand the ritual of Rundown, which 
includes chugging beer, air raids, submarine attacks, and 
storming the house itself (far right). 





136 Patterson Court 




7 J 




SAE (first row) Gardner Roddey. 
John Carroll. William Stroud. Rob 
Moore. Duncan McCall. Ben 
Williams. Jerry Myers. Chris 
Daniels. John Lyday. Minor 
Hanson (second row) Ken 
Murrah. Jeff Kane. Chip Lyerly. 
Burt Taylor. Ed Goode. J C 
Faulkner. Shawn Stafford. Marc 
Webster. Brooks Babcock. Brad 
McCall. David Carr (third row) 
Tom Martin. Terry Kurtts, Freddie 
Butler. Mike Mauze. Rob 
Spaugh. Knox Kerr. John Cam, 
Phil Goodnow. Bob Gould. Dan 
Newsome (fourth row) Bob 
Bowden. Jay Norman. Steve 
Carter. Warren Lackey. Shep 
Robinson. Mike Cooper. Bill 
King. Dean Jones. Sam Outten. 
Chip Christian (fifth row) Rusty 
Colechia. Paul Baynard. Doug 
Henson. Al Baldwin. Edwin 
Smith. Matt Merrell. Jimmy 
Kinsey. George Ibrahim (sixth 
row) Bill Purcell. John McCall 
Chris Holden. Buck Bradberry. 
Jim Cox. Yancey Carter. Clittl 
Tnbus (last row) Chip Hoover. 
Pete Jannetta. Dickson M 
Mark Blackm.r 
Stuart Dorse" 
Phil Gordon ■ 
Gaines T 
Mann 



Patterson Court 137 



Are Fraternities 
As Harmless As 
They Appear? 

Fraternities are becoming more popular on the Davidson 
campus, and with this increase of popularity, several negative 
aspects of the system arise. Many professors and students 



view the six Davidson fraternities as basically innocuous 
groups of males who enjoy partying. Beneath this facade, 
however, problems exist. 

In the past year several fraternities either participated in or 
were victims of vandalism. SAEs "stormed" the ATO house, 
and in a more serious incident, an anonymous group 
vandalized the Sig Ep house on North Main Street. 
According to house member Lex Alexander, he discovered 
trophies strewn up and down Main Street and his personal 
album collection tossed out of the second story window. 
Although Lex found out who was responsible for destroying 
his possessions, he was unable to seek any recompense. Is 
vandalism a necessary byproduct of the fraternity system? If 
so, something is inherently wrong in the entire system. ■ 




SPE: (seated) Lex Alexander, Frank Clark. Ralph Taylor. Brent Hilleary. Eddie Beeker. Ricky Watson. Rich Glaze, 
(first row) Ken Howarth. Gus Jamison. Phil Harry. Kelly Moore. Tom Roth. Nathan Caldwell. Jim Reaves. Gary 
Schenk, Doug Austin. Eric Hill. David Hutchinson, Lanny Conley. Brian Sloan. Eric Fink, Brian Flanagan, Al Potter 
(second row) David Gaston. Pete Gulyn. Hunter Monroe. Alan Fields, Brad Waddell, Eric Weiss, Bob Whalen, Bucky 
Murrell, Jim Brown, (last row) Steve Lawrence, George Hatfield. Jeff Knudson, David Barnes, Carlton Clinkscales. 
(apex) Dan Plaut. 



§ 



138 Patterson Court 



SigEpSigEpSigEpSigEpSigEpSigEpSigEp. 




Any time of day or night, the Sig Eps are prepared to make 
the most of the occasion. SPE members (far left), imbibe a 
variety of inexpensive American beers while supposedly 
listening to the music of Chairman of the Board. Bob Whalen 
and Barry Mack (left), show Shannon Anderson the scenic 
SPE bathroom at their Pajama Party. Later in the evening, 
Barry, Boe Young, Will Witherspoon, Brad Waddell and 
Bucky Murrell (below), practice cannibalism as they consume 
the final bottles of champagne. 




Patterson Court 139 



College Union continues to 
provide relief from studies, 
boredom and hunger 



Especially in the dead of winter, the Davidson College Grey Union (right) offers 
students the opportunity to escape the confines of classrooms, dorms, and the 
library. Like many other students, senior John Spangler (far right) finds a solitary 
table in the snack bar a stimulating environment in which to begin a paper. Not to 
be out done by other changes on campus, the snack bar, too, subjected itself to 
a little cosmetic surgery. With the advent of the college run food service, students 
may now visit the Union Cafe. Adverse effects of the new system include 
shortened hours, but these are amply balanced by the installation of a highly 
frequented ice cream bar. This is no way to combat the freshman 10. Aside from 
changes in the kitchen, Union scenes appear much the same as always. James 
Jones (bottom center) breaks from academics in the game room, while desk 
worker Janice Dalton (below) settles in for a long evening of providing 
entertainment for any starved, bored, or procrastinating students still wandering 
the halls. 




■ .: " 



140 Union 




UNION BOARD (front) Mike Goode (Hist row) Ellen Gyauch. Pam Hawkins. Susan R, 
Foreman Dave Webb (second row) Warner Hall. Chuck Still. Sherman Allen. Ann Parker. Jean 
Sorocco Bob Trobich. Betsy Haas. Norwood Smith, (third row) Eric Christianson. Marvii 
Robin Barnes Lyman Collins. Lmdsey Biddle. John Shaw. Jeff Herrin. Carol Impara. Shaw Smith. 



Union 141 



The Union: It Isn't 

Just for Weekends 

Anymore 



Grey Union caters 
numerous special events 



Revitalization was the key word for the 
1982 Union Board, as the academic 
year saw a definite upswing in the 
number of activities scheduled. 
Helping with one of the Union's many 
activities, Mike Mell (right), cuts out 
snowflake decorations for the Christmas 
party. A kilted Robbie Singleton 
(below), speeds across the football field 
with a rope in hand while he 
participates in the Homecoming 
Highland games. In another of the 
Union games, Jimmy "Muhammed" 
(top center right), ingests his way 
toward the Pancake Consumption title. 
Gordon Turnbull (far right), raises a 
toast to all who gave during the ROTC 
blood drive held in the Union. Brian 
Nash, Phoebe Forio, and Dr. Manning 
(bottom right), watch the lunar eclipse 
which appeared on the walls of the 
snack bar. Manning was heard to 
remark, "I don't know how they did it, 
but it sure beats the hell out of digging 
up frozen holes in Scotland. " 




The Union, that home for 
wandering treshmen and independent 
upperclassmen, became more than a 
place to get a rubbery bagel, read a 
recent magazine, and watch T.V. 
Bingo games, Halloween and other 
holiday parties, open luncheons, and 
free ice cream at exam time allured 
a different, more varied group of 
students through the double doors of 
the snack bar into the more obvious 
rooms of the Union. 

Expanding beyond the building 




142 Union 



itself, the people ot the Union 
encouraged physical participation 
with the Homecoming Highland 
games and soccer matches of the 
International Fair The influence 
spread as poets Charles Wright and 
Mike Martin performed readings and 
political figures Julian Bond and 
William F. Buckley gave speeches on 
current issues. Music also reached 
students when the Union sponsored 
an appearance of the Charlotte 
Symphony. Aware of the Union, 



students performed in the 900 room 
in their student recitals and during 
the Open Mike array of student 
talent In the most obvious and 
fruitful returns of the Unions' efforts, 
a group from the college adapted, 
directed and acted in their 
performance of the musical Godspell. 
Even professors could make their 
voices heard when participating in 
the professor lecture series. 

In addition to being a comfortable 
place to talk with friends or the 



source of many activities, the Union 
houses the workings for the 
Davidsonian. Quips and Cranks. 
WDAV radio station, and the Careers 
office Here students can use their 
abilities, and their ideas, and give 
them to their peers Other life stirs 
as receptions and banquets occur 
silently in unseen rooms where 
trustees and entertainers are dined. 
Though there are many nondescript 
doors in the Union, few of them lead 
to just a broom closet ■ 




Union 143 



Want To Know What's Happening? 
Peruse Announcements 



For many people, weekends mean 
planning, organizing, and thought. The 
College Union apparently has 
recognized this, and to combat such 
activity, publishes a bi-weekly 
Announcements sheet to steer the wise 
through an average Davidson weekend. 
In general, Announcements does a 
good job; almost anything organized 
that anyone plans to do anywhere on 
campus appears on the calender. As a 
result, the students must only sift 
through the myriad activities to create 
that perfect weekend. Let's take a look. 

The announcements themselves 
reveal significant qualities about the 



events described. Watch punctuation 
and diction as clues to the nature of 
the event. Example: "Do ya wanna get 
down? . . . Bring it on over to Emanon 
for a FUNKtastic time. Boogie till you 
drop!" It even sounds like a groovy, 
ungrammatical evening. Contrast this 
with a certain Friday afternoon 
Chemistry Colloquium: "Electron 
Transfer in Glassy Organic Matrices at 
77K." No made-up words there, that's 
for sure. Not a single exclamation point. 
These guys are serious. Such contrast 
make activity choosing a breeze. 
Decide what you want to do, and 
match it up with the appropriate 



grammar. Granted, these examples 
illustrate extremes. The Davidson 
weekend can fall anywhere in between. 
Announcements mentions it all, from 
the expected to the extraordinary. Pop 
films and discos appear regularly; they 
are common place events. At the same 
time, however, they stand as two 
continual successes, and are among 
the more popular activities on campus. 
Special events, such as plays, debates, 
international fairs, and appearances by 
College musical groups also capture the 
campus's interest; almost any activity 
on campus will draw a crowd of some 
size. 




144 Union 



Announcements fails, however, to 
mention two key areas of weekend 
entertainment for Davidson students: 
Patterson Court and the open road If 
that presentation of slides from India 
fails to pique your curiosity, one Court 
house or another usually has some 
activitiy planned. The open road, on the 
other hand, stands as a last frontier for 
those seeking true Adventure No 



announcement sheet guides anyone in 
this case; the event can be anything 
from lce-9 at the Milestone to P & G 
Muffies at Queens. All is relative, you 
see. A DC weekend can be planned or 
spontaneous; highbrow or now brow; 
on campus or off; mundane or 
memorable. The options exist — it is 
just a matter of taking some initiative. 




900 Room attracts outside 
entertainers 



From debates to music, the 900 Room 
offers a wide variety of non-student 
entertainment. The Dirt Band's lead 
member John McKuen (far left), 
amazes an audience with his guitar 
playing and humor, while Edmunds and 
Curley (center left), simply make them 
laugh. Lash Larue (left), captivates 
Shaw Smith with his cowboy stories 
and rope tricks. At an Open Luncheon. 
Coach Hussey details Davidson's 
basketball program to Elizabeth Kiss. 
Rusty King and others (below). 



•- .. ,i - • 




Union 145 



Student entertainers make 
weekends at Davidson 
worth the stay 



Whether on or off the 900 Room stage, 
Davidson students serve as a constant 
source of entertainment. Jazz Ensemble 
members Johnnie Leazer (left) and Jon 
Lawry (center), play solo excerpts on 
their horns during a Saturday night 
show. At Open Mike Night, John Hoots, 
Paul Ward and Bill Heard (right), 
combine their talents, while Mick Smith 
(bottom right), takes over the 
microphone alone, aided only by his 
trusty guitar. Just as Loy Thorton 
(below), steals the show in the student- 
directed production ofGodspell, Albert 
Nester (top), attracts the most attention 
at a 900 Room disco. 





146 Union 




Union 147 



Homecoming: a 
Scottish delight 



Wearing their Davidson plaid, 
alumni (center), enjoy 
the whole point of the Homecoming 
weekend. (Counterclockwise from 
below) Carol Hoopes and John Carroll 
watch Robbie Singleton dance with a 
baseball bat, as Norwood Smith rips 
into some good old Scottish jello. 
Braving the rain, Suzy Myers and 
Lorelei Keif watch the games. During 
the Homecoming concert, the sax 
player for the Delbert McClinton Band 
entertains the audience. Receiving the 
crown from Lisa Harbottle, Barbara 
Kelley smiles at being named the new 
queen. Finally, Keith Hearle and Lynn 
Powell dance in the crowd. 





148 Union 





Union 149 



In the heat of 
Midwinters 





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7fte Midwinters weekend provided 
students an opportunity to have a 
change in the normal bleakness of a 
winter term. Enjoying a communal bath 
before the dance, Stewart Tabb and 
Mark Murrey (above), sip beer in the 
hot tub outside of the Union. 
Georgeann Vagt (bottom right), shares 
a Midwinters dinner with Parks Snead 
at PAX. After a day full of activities, 
Sarah Galiley and Craig Adams (right), 
separately share one another's 
company while Ginger Holly and Ron 
Cox (top right), dance cheek-to-cheek. 
The weekend for couples continues as 
Bret Logan and Leslie Shy (below), 
recall their evening over early morning 
crepes at A TO. 





150 Union 




Union 151 




Music fills 
Spring Frolics' air 



152 Union 



Spring Frolics took advantage of the 
good weather with its outdoor concert. 
Carol Roche and Stan Hynds (bottom 
right), stretch out to listen to the music 
of Grinderswitch (right), while Mike 
Smith, Andrea Geyer, and John Niepold 
(top), sway to the music. Enjoying a 
beer, Pam Hawkins (top right), intently 
listens to the concert. After Friday's 
events, Genevra Kelly and her boyfriend 
(top center), dance during the 
culmination of the weekend. A singer 
from the group Stormy (above), fills the 
Commons with music. Exhausted from 
all the activity, Cheryl Soderstrom (far 
center right), collapses upon the lawn 
for a little rest. 




Union 153 



See, hear, feel with the variety of the 
artists series 








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For tf?ose vvrto sai/or music, the performances of this 
year's Artists Series offered several methods and 
adaptations of it. The Conti-Guglia duo pianists (bottom 
left), smile after an invigorating development of Classical 
and Romantic music. As an inspiration for their 
movements, The Oakland Ballet Company (far bottom 
right), and the Nanette Beardon Contemporary Chamber 
Dance Group (right), use varied types of music from 
several cultures. Penetrating to an ancient source of 
music, Richard-Dyer Bennett (bottom center right), gives 
his interpretations of Homer's Odyssey. The Acting 
Company's rendition of A Midsummer Night's Dream (left), 
sends the audience into the mystical, lyrical imagination of 
Shakespeare. Being more blatant in its communication, a 
road troupe (below), acts out what appears to be a 
murder in a scene from Agatha Christie's thriller 
Deathtrap. 







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154 The Arts 





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The Arts 155 




156 The Arts 



Davidson Drama Department features 
Hollywood's heyday and England's 
past 




The drama department began a successful season with the 
fall production of Once in a Lifetime. Presenting the 
adventure of three friends who seek fame from the budding 
Hollywood film industry, cast members Todd Kimsey. Joyce 
Robinson, and Chris Gunn (center left), discuss their plans 
while on board a train. On the way back, Doug Vass and 
Joyce Robinson (bottom left), exchange tales. Joyce (below), 
prepares tor a performance. Davidson alumni and students 
got the chance to take their skill to Charlotte's Spirit Square 
when James Pendleton ('52) presented the premiere of his 
play Ralegh! Todd Cowdery as Sir Walter Ralegh (top left), 
confides in Queen Elizabeth (Janet Ward Black) in a scene 
about the treason charges brought against Ralegh in 1614. 
An elaborately dressed Ralegh (far left), speaks during the 
play termed "A laudable family affair" by the Charlotte 
Observer. 




The Arts 157 




158 The Arts 



Dramatic fare for the young and old: Godspell 
and Androcles and the Lion 



Students seemed to make the dramatic performances this 
year, even if they were not participating in the major fall 
productions. To help defray costuming costs for Ralegh!, a 
group of students presented Godspell in the 900 room. 
Matt Merrell as Jesus and Eric Fichtner as Peter (right). 
dance during a lighter moment, then as the mood 
switches. Matt (bottom right), defends a prostitute from 
the crowd. Charlie Lovett (below), stands in an unrealized 
crucifix while George Booth and Pat Donley (top left), 
contribute to the musical. In the final scene, Matt (bottom 
left), portrays the death of Christ. For children. Pete 
Skillern, Loy Thornton, and Karen Baldwin (far top right). 
enact a scene from Androcles and the Lion. Doug Vass 
attempts to confuse Loy while Pete watches an ominous 
object approach (far bottom right), in the play performed 
in the drama workshop. 





The Arts 159 



The brass, the strings and the wind 
come to town 



One of the more popular recurring events on campus, the 
Jazz Ensemble (top right), plays good, hard music during 
one of their performances in the 900 room. Inspired 
performances by students such as Trig Adams (top left) 
and pianist Paul Ward (below and bottom left) create an 
excellent jazz sound. French Horn players Rick Peek, John 
Walsh, Lisa Harbottle, and Jim Trotter (lower right corner) 
prepare for a concert, alone in Hodson Hall. At an 
outdoor concert, flutists Lucy Marshall, Cambria Melton, 
Alice Musick, Elizabeth Brazell, and Deborah Schretter 
entertain the audience. 




160 The Arts 




The Arts 161 




MEN AND WOMEN'S CONCERT CHOIR: (first row) Cindy Clark. Carolyn 
Leavitt. Jamie Brown. Laura McDonald, Karen Hopper. Stephanie Moltett. 
Diana Bohrer. Katie Dagenhart. Amy Burton, Jenny Cooper. Aubrey 
Humphries. Alva Moore, (second row) Anne Lofquist. Alice Packard. Whit 
Wampler. Jean Covell, Kathy Clark. Shannon Hamilton. Tracy Askew. Lynn 
McClintock. Lucy Phillips, Stephanie Bruck, Mary Womble Barringer, 
Elizabeth Laughlin. (third row) Sarah Moody. Mark Oldenburg, Bryan Duke. 
Gus Jamison, David Graybeal, Todd Cowdery. Tim Schipke. Paul Coggins, 
John Eglin. John Toler, Joan Redding, (fourth row) Walt Dean. Tom Walker. 
Earl Wooten. Danny Waddill. Tony Broyles. John James. Brian Brost, Sam 
Sommers. Jim Shaw. Dave Hall. 



162 The Arts 



Men's and women's choruses 
merge into full-fledged concert 
choir 




This year Davidson students could still make their voices 
heard, but with the coming of the new choir director Vladimir 
Morosan, the technique changed. In addition to a separate . 
practice for sections and males and females, the choir joined 
one night a week for a combined men and women's group. 
Alva Moore (bottom left), directs her attention toward 
Morosan during one of the many rehearsals. The training was 
rigid, yet Karen Hopper, Aubrey Humphries, and Jenny 
Cooper (far top left), give a stronger performance because of 
it. After their spring break tour around mid-America, the 
combined choir (below), sings for spring convocation. Later 
they sang for the graduation ceremony. Breaking off from 
the mainstream operatic tones of a concert choir, Walt Dean, 
Brian Brost, Mark Oldenburg, and Todd Cowdery (left), enjoy 
singing in the hometown Barbershop quartet style. 



p*' m?i- 




The Arts 163 



hen one considers that about 75% of the Davidson student body participates in IMAC and 
that another significant percentage of students play varsity 
or club sports at the intercollegiate level, he realizes just how much 
athletics are a part of the "Davidson Experience." And these 
figures don't even touch the number of people who participate 
vicariously from the stands. In the words of Professor David Shi, 
"athletic activity is a physical challenge, a refreshing diversion, and a 
convenient excuse to be outdoors. Without some form of recreation, 
academic life can become stultifying." 

In the minds of many students, athletics complement the 
academics at Davidson. They are "a good way to get away from 
academics, people, or anything else." To release tension, to escape 
studies or to have "fun" are but a few of the comments we use to 
describe our feelings about sports. But, like anywhere else, some 
people take sports to the extreme. One anonymous soccer player 
believes that "academics are second to athletics; but don't use my 
name, my parents would kill me." On the other hand another I- 
wish-to-remain-unidentified — student claims that athletics don't 
play the role they should due to the heavy academic workload. Yet 
athletes Howard Browne and Marie Cefalo claim it is possible to 

successfully combine sports with their major studies. In Marie's 

words, "you're going for the A's and you're going for the slam 
dunks. Once you ace it or slam it, it's a great feeling." 

Trying to find a soul on this campus who dislikes sports proved to 
be a futile task. To include the comments of some overweight 
academician who would ooze statements like "sweat repulses my 
sensibilities" or "support public transportation: ride the elevator in 
Chambers" would have balanced the sports lovers' opinions. But the 
most disdainful comment came from a spectator-sports enthusiast 
who first spoke the proverbial words: "Sports are a form of physical 
fulfillment." But with a grin in his eye and natural delights in his 
heart he added, "Agh, physical fulfillment ... but you can get that 
from coeds too."B 



\ 



The world of Davidson athletics 
includes many experiences' from 
the agony of IMAC to the thrill of 
Division I basketball. (Clockwise 
from top left) Dave Riopel looks 
for the open man on flickerball 
action fall term, while guard John 
Carroll finds the open shot 
against N.C State. Elizabeth 
Hargrove looks forward to three 
more years of the Davidson 
Experience on the cross country 



course, and the Units of 2nd 
East are geared for three years 
of cheering on the red and 
black. Record breaker Ray 
Sinclair is about to run over a 
would-be Catawba tackier 
enroute to 260 yards in the 
season finale. Mike Kelley ties up 
an opponent on the wrestling 
mats and cheerleader Patti Long 
does her stuff in the center 
ring. 







Regardless of losses, baseballers entertain Wildcat fans 




In spite of their losing record, George 
Greer & Company gave Wildcat tans a 
run for their money during the 1982 
season. The players put on some 
exciting shows, in which Wildcat players 
truly put their hearts behind their bats 
as Bobby Barnes can attest (top). 
There was awesome play in the field as 
well, with shortstop Allen Griffen 
making brilliant plays at second base 
(right), and with mound heroics by a 
young pitching staff, including 
sophomore reliever Scott Redding 
(above). 




166 Sports 




The 1982 baseball season did not turn 
out as first-year coach George Greer 
has hoped, as his team suffered a 
disappointing 13-26 record, despite 
strong efforts by many of the players 
Greer's most consist ant producer was 
co-captain Allen "Beaver" Griff en (left), 
who wound up an outstanding career at 
Davidson by breaking the 400 plateau 
for the second year in a row. as he 
slugged . 422 Greer also hailed the 
masterful performance of co-captain 
Rusty Colechia. who pitched his way to 
a 6-7 record which could easily have 
been better had the offense not been 
plagued by a lumber slumber. In fact, 
several of the one-run losses could 
have gone the other way. especially a 
1-0 loss to the Tarheels which included 
a controversial homeplate call: a not at 
all uncommon event in baseball (below 
left). Seniors Marc Webster, Earl 
Ransom (far left), and Brian Whitmire 
all closed out their careers admirably in 
the home season finale win over UNCC. 



BASEBALL TEAM (first row) Chip Fishback. Allen Griltin. Mick Smith. David Hutchinson. Greg 
Pitser. Mark Adams (second row) Todd Pierce. Scott Redding. Jeff McSwam. Bobby Barnes. Carl 
Rist. Todd Hermetz. Doug Wiley. Earl Ransom (third row) Coach George Greer. Phillip Gordon. Ed 
Whitesides. Brian Whitmire. Al Baldwin. Rusty Colechia. Jeff Currier Not Pictured: Marc Webster 





BASEBALL 






Won 


13 Lost 26 




DAVIDSON 


6 


Armstrong State 


3 


DAVIDSON 


5 


Armstrong State 


3 


Davidson 





South Carolina 


23 


DAVIDSON 


7 


Bloomsburg 


6 

7 


Davidson 


5 


VMI 


DAVIDSON 


7 


VMI 


5 


Davidson 


7 


Slippery Rock 


14 


DAVIDSON 


6 


California (Pa ) 


3 
9 


Davidson 


3 


VPI 


Davidson 


7 


Fairleigh-Dickmson 


8 


DAVIDSON 


7 


Fairmont State 


5 


DAVIDSON 


6 


Fairmont State 





Davidson 


4 


Marshall 


16 


Davidson 





Marshall 


10 


Davidson 


3 


Gardner-Webb 


4 


DAVIDSON 


4 


Gardner-Webb 


3 


Davidson 


5 


Wake Forest 


14 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Pteifter 


2 


Davidson 


7 


UNCC 


9 


Davidson 


4 


UNC-Chapel Hill 


13 
10 


Davidson 





Furman 


Davidson 


8 


Furman 


9 
6 


Davidson 


3 


Citadel 


Davidson 


8 


Citadel 


27 


Davidson 


4 


Catawba 


5 
3 
2 
15 
16 


Davidson 


2 


Appalachian 


DAVIDSON 


4 


Appalachian 


Davidson 


3 


Wmgate 


Davidson 


9 


Catawba 


DAVIDSON 


13 


Warren Wilson 


1 1 


Davidson 





UNC-Chapel Hill 




Davidson 


2 


Gardner-Webb 


5 


DAVIDSON 


7 


Gardner-Webb 


5 


Davidson 


3 


Wmthrop 


Davidson 


3 


East Tp 




Davidson 


1 






DAVIDSON 


4 




5 
17 


Davidson 


1 


■ 


Davidson 




. 


^^^^^ i ^^^ -— 



Sports 167 



Hussey Sparks Cat Cagers To Life 



Ordinarily, a change in an athletic 
team's coaching statf means that the 
following season will be one of 
rebuilding and only marginal success. 
With this in mind, few people expected 
the Wildcats to perform even 
respectably this past season, following 
the firing of Head Coach Eddie 
Biedenbach and the departure of two 
starters from the 1980-81 lineup. Thus, 
it was a welcome surprise to Davidson 
basketball fans when the 1981-82 
season ended with the Cats enjoying 
their highest tally of wins in eight years 
and a trip to the Southern Conference 
Tournament finals as well. 

Undeniably, the turnover in the Cats' 
coaching staff was an improvement. 
Bobby Hussey, the man chosen to 
succeed short-lived Biedenbach 
replacement John Kresse, brought with 
him a new attitude and a real sense of 
purpose which helped him overcome 
the inconveniences imposed by a post- 
season coaching change. Hussey later 
pointed out, "We had the potential to 
be better than anyone thought we 
could be." In spite of such promises, 
Hussey refused to set any win-column 
goals for his first season, saying, "I'm 
not worried about that." However, his 



concern for more immediate matters, 
such as improving player morale and 
unity, and developing team play, 
spurred the team to 14 wins overall this 
season, including a victory over ACC 
member Duke University. Discussing 
Hussey's single season coaching feat, 
junior guard John Carroll commented, 
"The contract with last year's chaos 
made us respond even more to Coach 
Hussey's leadership and organization." 
With his first season at Davidson now 
behind him, Hussey looks forward to 
bringing stability to a basketball 
program which has suffered numerous 
coaching turnovers in recent seasons. 
Coach Hussey also aims to restore 



Davidson's bygone preeminence in the 
Southern Conference. Recruiting will no 
doubt be a key and Hussey 
acknowledges the difficulties he expects 
to encounter in finding prospects who 
are both quality students and 
distinguished basketball players. 
Nonetheless, Hussey is optimistic, 
remarking, "There are two to three 
hundred high school athletes who could 
come here. We only need five!" After 
his unpredicted success in 1981-82 
Hussey has raised his sights even 
higher, declaring, "I want our level of 
athletic achievement to equal the level 
of academic achievement at Davidson 
College." ■ 



WEN'S BASKETBALL 






Won 14 Lost 15 




Davidson 


55 


N.C. State 


76 


DAVIDSON 


73 


Baptist 


59 


Davidson 


65 


Erskine 


74 


Davidson 


63 


Wake Forest 


82 


DAVIDSON 


63 


Citadel 


55 


Davidson 


71 


UNCC 


78 


DAVIDSON 


64 


Appalachian 


62 


Davidson 


47 


Citadel 


49 


DAVIDSON 


75 


Duke 


73 


Davidson 


44 


William & Mary 


46 


DAVIDSON 


63 


Furman 


45 


DAVIDSON 


54 


Western Carolina 


51 


Davidson 


65 


Marshall 


67 


Davidson 


59 


East Tennessee 


69 


Davidson 


55 


UT-Chattanooga 


71 


Davidson 


45 


Notre Dame 


59 


DAVIDSON 


71 


East Tennessee 


69 


DAVIDSON 


61 


Marshall 


59 


DAVIDSON 


72 


VMI 


58 


Davidson 


59 


UT-Chattanooga 


66 


DAVIDSON 


79 


VMI 


63 


DAVIDSON 


56 


Appalachian 


54 


Davidson 


69 


Western Carolina 


90 


DAVIDSON 


52 


South Carolina 


51 


Davidson 


44 


Furman 


62 


Davidson 


72 


UNCC 


74 


DAVIDSON 


74 


Furman 


66 


Southern Conference Tournament (2nd Place) 


DAVIDSON 


57 


Citadel 


54 


Davidson 


58 


UT-Chattanooga 


69 




168 Sports 



Basketball team takes second place in Southern Conference 



A preseason change in the Wildcat 
coaching staff gave rise to pessimistic 
speculation over the success of the 
cagers' 1981-82 season, but the 
change turned out to be in the Cats' 
best interests The new head coach. 
Bobby Hussey. came to Davidson from 
Belmont Abbey and in his first season 



guided a team picked to finish seventh 
to a 14- 15 record and second place in 
the Southern Conference Tournament 
Senior co-captains Jamie Hall (left) and 
Tommy McConnell led the young team 
as All-Conference candidates Cliff 
Tribus (opposite page) and Kenny 
Wilson (below) came into their own. 




BASKETBALL TEAM (Kneeling, Tony Hoi,. Tommy McConnell <F,rs, Row, Assistant Coach J,m Bake, Assistant Coach Rot,^ - - 
Rmger Scot, Brandon Kenny Wilson. Trent Westmoreland. Frank Johnson. John Carroll. Assistant Coach Gerry Vaillancourt. Head Coach I 
Hussey (Second Row) Gary McDonald. Brian Rowan. Cliff Tribus. Skip Brown. Jamie Hall. Rich Wilson. Tom Franz 



Sports 169 



Women's basketball faces higher division competition but tops previous year's 



The 1981-82 edition of the women's 
basketball team was a young one, with 
no seniors on the squad. Junior co- 
captains Jeanne Womack (right) and 
Mike Frankhouser (shooting; bottom) 
provided leadership on the court, trying 
to coordinate the inexperienced team 
and develop a balanced scoring attack. 
Jeanne and Mike formed an effective 
inside-outside scoring duo which, along 
with the quickness and shrewd play of 
junior guard Mitzi Short (below), served 
as a solid nucleus about which the 
team improved over the season. 




170 Sports 



performance 




Endowed with a core of experienced 
players and a returning coaching staff, 
the 1981-82 women's basketball team 
was able to start out the season on a 
positive note The addition of guards 
Anne Elliot and Kathy Bray to the 
squad provided needed depth and 
enhanced the team's outside shot 
threat, just as newcomer Sally Howell 
effectively complemented Mike 
Frankhouser (left) on the inside. Though 
the team suffered from the loss of 
forwards Rebecca Bates and Carol 
Heppner to knee injuries, the Lady Cats 
exhibited formidable inside and outside 
play, with wings Nancy Bondurant and 
Mitzi Short (far left) running the offense. 
The team's immense improvement is 
not evident in the season's record 
because the Lady Cats unfortunately 
faced a much tougher schedule than 
the year before. The Davidson team 
ordinarily competes only with local 
schools in Division III league but was 
forced to pick up most of its games for 
1982 with schools which play Division II 
basketball. Fven so, the women have 
doubled their win percentage over the 
previous season's and have shown that 
they can indeed challenge teams of 
Division II caliber. With the expected 
return of the entire squad, the team 
can only look up. 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 






Won 7 Lost 17 




Davidson 


33 


Catawba 


82 


DAVIDSON 


78 


Meredith 


67 


Davidson 


52 


J C Smith 


74 


Davidson 


56 


UNC-Greensboro 


69 


Davidson 


40 


Converse 


54 


Davidson 


49 


J.C. Smith 


65 


Davidson 


41 


Wmgate 


73 


Davidson 


51 


Catawba 


67 


Davidson 


56 


UNC-Greensboro 


69 


DAVIDSON 


62 


Meredith 


50 


Davidson 


45 


Bennett 


70 


Davidson 


52 


Furman 


63 


Davidson 


53 


Greensboro 


66 


DAVIDSON 


53 


Sacred Heart 


52 


Davidson 


47 


Converse 


54 


Davidson 


58 


St Andrews 


69 


Davidson 


54 


Wingate 


68 


Davidson 


40 


Bennett 


50 


DAVIDSON 


70 


Sacred Heart 


66 


DAVIDSON 


53 


Greensboro 


38 


DAVIDSON 


62 


Meredith 


54 


DAVIDSON 


79 


Warren Wilson 


71 


Davidson 


45 


Sacred Heart 


53 


Davidson 


55 


Ferrum 


69 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL (First RDM 
Bondurant. Caroline Rumley. Debbie Hayes 
(Second Row) Kathy Bra ■ " I Carol 

Heppner. Cathy Moretl. - 
Row) Coach Dee Maye' 

Boyer. Mike Frankhouser Salty Howell. Jeanne 
Womack. Rebecca Bates Not Pictured) Anne 
Elliott. Amy Cnttenberger 



Sports 171 



Wildcat runners improve marks while Lady Cats shine 



The men and women on the Davidson 
cross country team enjoyed a rousing 
1981 season, characterized by personal 
bests and re-established course 
records. The men, led by senior co- 
captains Randy McManus and Howard 
Browne, rushed to an eleventh place 
finish in the N.C. State meet and a 
strong sixth in the Southern Conference 
Championships. McManus had 
consistently captured top laurels among 
his teammates throughout the season 



and he was named team MVP. 
Outdoing the men as a team, the Lady 
Cats, under the guidance of captain 
Sarah Todd, seized a stunning fourth 
place in the State Championship meet. 
MVP Marian Hill and teammates Carie 
Nunn and Sarah Patterson (threesome 
pictured below) paced the squad to its 
remarkable finish. Both teams were 
coached by Sterling Martin who 
inspired the determination evident 
on the face of David Teer (at right). 





L' .ItA v» •. 912 




CROSS COUNTRY TEAMS: (front: kneeling) James Rogers. Tamara Foreman. Will Donovan. Jeff Hamilton, (center: wall) Danny Armistead, Tom 
Marshburn, Jean Webb. Ginna McGee. Marian Hill. Elizabeth Hargrove. Sarah Patterson. Christine Seel, Susan Dresser. Jack Smith, Frank Ivey. Randy 
McManus. (rear) Bryan Zielinski. Coach Sterling Martin. David Stosur, Jim Trotter, John Malone. Howard Browne. Sarah Todd. Lanny Smith. David 
Teer. (not pictured) Victor Hawk. John Hendrix. John Hoots. George Meriwether, Greg Murphy. Carie Nunn. Melissa Peacock. John Rees. Andy Scott. 
Joe Sloop. Garry Sullivan. Robert Teer. Jane Thompson. 



172 Sports 




CROSS CO 






Won 7 Lost 7 




ison 


30 


Western Carolina 


28 


Davidson 


28 


USC-Sparlanburg 


27 


Davidson 


41 


Duke 


18 


DAVIDSON 


22 


Lynchburg 


37 


DAVIDSON 


17 


Roanoke 


42 


DAVIDSON 


20 


jnite 


41 


Davidson 


73 


Appalachian 


25 


Davidson 


73 


Furman 


32 


Davidson 


38 


VMI 


20 


DAVIDSON 


28 


Campbell 


29 


DAVIDSON 


18 


UNCC 


45 


DAVIDSON 


18 


Georgia State 


33 


Davidson 


33 


Citadel 


23 


DAVIDSON 


28 


UNC-Wilmmgton 


29 


1 ith in Slate Championship Meet 




6th in Southern Conference Championships 


WOMEN'S CROSS COUNTRY 






Won 3 Lost 1 




DAVIDSON 


23 


Duke 


32 


DAVIDSON 


16 


Lynchburg 


47 


Davidson 


30 


Appalachian 


21 


DAVIDSON 


19 


UNC-Wilmmgton 


41 


6th in ASU Invitational Meet 




4th in State Championship Meet 




9th in AIAW 


Region II Meet 







The 1981 season saw both the men's 
and women's squads ordinarily running 
in tight team fashion, hoping to gain a 
scoring edge by attempting successive 
finishes. In this way. Frank Ivey. Randy 
McManus. Garry Sullivan and Jack 
Smith charge up a hill on the Davidson 
course (above left). Freshman Jim 
Rogers winds down a shady stretch of 



the Davidson course during the 
European Championships (left). It was 
the team effort in this meet which 
helped pace injured Frank Ivey to a fifth 
place finish among the Cats. In fact, 
injury was not at all uncommon in this 
rugged trek, and even the most 
experienced runners required post-race 
surgery (above). 



Sports 173 



Young hockey team fails to match last year's performance but shows talent 



The 198 1 edition of the field hockey 
team had a tough act to follow after 
the previous year's team captured the 
State Championship title and 
proceeded to the Nationals. But if any 
group had the desire to get there 
again, this one surely did. 

Preseason training brought a number 
of new faces out to the field, with eight 
untried players joining the team. With 
so many inexperienced players and 
under the burden of the loss of last 
year's two top scorers (Junior Carol 
Heppner was sidelined with a knee 
injury and Cathy Inabnet was lost to 
graduation) it was bound to take the 
team a few games to get itself 
together. Patience and determination 
proved to be key factors as the team 
opened with five straight losses. 
However, with Coach Dee Mayes 
keeping team morale high and junior 
co-captains Amy Crittenberger and 
Cathy Morell (below) providing 
outstanding leadership, the team finally 
began to gel. 

Beginning with a victory over 
Converse at home, the team went on to 
win four out of its last five games, 
advancing to the State Tournament. 



Unfortunately, the team lost in the finals 
of the tourney to High Point, but 
nevertheless enjoyed revenge the 
following week in the regional semi- 
finals, where they dealt the same rival a 
2- 1 defeat on the strength of one of 
Amy Crittenberger' s famous flicks. A 
subsequent victory over Richmond 
would have sent the Ladycats to the 
National Tournament for the second 
year in a row. As ill luck would have it, 
this was not to be, and Richmond 
came out on top 2-0. 

Despite the disappointing tournament 
outcome, the season was really a rather 
promising one for the young team, 
which lost no one to graduation. An 
abundance of defensive talent, including 
junior Sweeper Mebane Atwood (at 
right), should give the team an even 
stronger back field than the 1981 
season defensive unit, which was able 
to foil opponents' shots with its 
amazing stick-work and rallying efforts 
(below right). With outstanding center 
halfback Amy Crittenberger leading a 
host of returning talented players, the 
field hockey team should have real 
scoring presence and their 1982 season 
should be a profitable one. 






174 Sports 





Though graced with talent, the hockey 
team did not fare so well early In the 
season. But by mid-season, the players 
had become accustomed to their new 
positions and to each other, and were 
able to organize a coordinated offensive 
attack and mount a late season 
conference comeback, propelled by 
hustling and vicious stick-wielding of 
Amy Crittenberger (above left) and 
backed by such determined play as 
that exhibited by power stroking 
Caroline Scragg (at left) and skillful 
passer Katie Dagenhart (above). 





FIELD HOCKEY 






Won 6 Lost 8 




Davidson 


1 


High Point 


3 


Davidson 





Clemson 


9 


Davidson 





Appalachian 


3 


Davidson 


1 


Catawba 


3 


Davidson 


u 


PfeiHer 


5 


DAVIDSON 


3 


Converse 


1 


DAVIDSON 


2 


Richmond 


1 


DAVIDSON 


2 


VCU 





Davidson 





Duke 


1 


DAVIDSON 


2 


Wake Forest 


1 


NCAIAW Stale Tournament (2nd Place) 




DAVIDSON 


3 


Wake Forest 


1 


Davidson 


1 


High Point 


3 


AIAW Region II Tournament (2nd Place) 




DAVIDSON 


2 


High Point 


1 


Davidson 





Richmond 


2 



FIELD HOCKEY TEAM (Fro 



Mitzi Short. Katie Dagenhart 
Gilmore. Caroline Scragg. Les 
Hamilton, Lisa Smith 
Kathy Thompson S 
(Rear) Mebane '• '■■ 
Coach Dee Mayes I 
Ann Hurl. Car 



Hall. 



qe Marsh, 



Sports 175 



Football season full of ups and downs 



The Davidson football team looks back 
on the 198 1 season with frustration, 
especially over the season's outset, 
during which the team's record 
plummeted to 1-3. The lone bright spot 
of those four games was a 2 1-20 
come-from-behind thriller vs. Wofford in 
which senior placekicker Wayne Paymer 
kicked the winning PAT with 0:19 on 
the clock. Roaring back to life, the Cats 
trounced heavily favored Boston 
University 44- 14 behind a balanced 
running and passing attack (at right). 
Then, after returning from an 
embarrassing 7-69 loss at l-AA 
powerhouse Lehigh, the Wildcats 
smothered down and out Hampden- 
Sydney 42- 14 in front of a packed 
Richardson Field Homecoming crowd 
(below left). The Cats finished off the 
season on a positive note, routing 
highly touted Catawba 52-29, as many 
seniors finished out their football 
careers. The offensive unit lost the 
talents of quarterback Brian Whitmire 
(below right) and star fullback Ray 
Sinclair (see next page). Defensively, 
the team graduated many key players, 
including Andre Kennebrew (#28, 
below left) and linebacker James 
McLain (#53 below left). 





176 Sports 




Although the Davidson gridders 
turned in a disappointing final record 
this fall, the Cats' 1981 season was not 
without noteworthy achievement as 
senior fullback Ray Sinclair (left) racked 
up awesome yardage gain for the team 
In fact, Ray's impressive statistics, 
which he earned with the line-ploughing 
running he best demonstrated in the 
Catawba game, hardly evince the 
team's overall performance. Against 
Catawba, Sinclair, who has been the 
mainstay of the Wildcat offense since 
his sophomore year, rushed for 260 
yards. Ray's yardage not only broke 
his earlier single game record of 255 
yards, but it gave him 1,001 yards on 
the season as he became the first 
Davidson back to surpass the 3,000 
yard mark, with 3, 085 yards. 





FOOTBALL 






Won 4 Lost 6 




Davidson 


7 


Newberry 


32 


OAVIDSON 


22 


Woflord 


21 


Davidson 


7 


Lafayette 


•■•• 


Davidson 


3 


Bucknell 


23 


DAVIDSON 


44 


Boston U 


14 


Davidson 


3 


Citadel 


23 


DAVIDSON 


42 


Hampden-Sydney 


14 


Davidson 


7 


Lehigh 


69 


Davidson 


12 


Furman 


30 


DAVIDSON 


52 


Catawba 


29 




FOOTBALL TEAM (front Row) Mark Cant. Wayne Paymer. Robb,e Thornsberry. Kendnck W,ll,ams. Derek Lee. William Bynum. Andre Kennebrew. 
Hunter Gourley M.ckey Dillon. Rusty McLelland. Carl Tolbert. Robb.e Brannen. Andy McRee (Second Row) Gary S,ms Flmt Gray. Bill Chaler Ke,th 
Shaw Jeff Haney Hunt Greene. Ron Schumer. Tom Hissam. Bob Letton. Allan White. Jell Bauschhcher. Lev, Jordan. Charles Hughes. Roger Herbert 
Dwayne Wnqht (Third Row) Ke,th Elhs. Joe McMullen. Jerry May. Keith Rawhns. Leonard Walker. M,ke Longmire. Ray Smclair. Lance Sisco. Mn 
Jones Dickson McLean. James Jones. Andy Rock. Bob Miller. Elmer Dyke. Tate Nichols (Fourth Row) Kirk Gavel Bryan Lowe. BUI Puce Tom 
Crooke Ern,e Andrews Pete Janetta. Brent Baker. Todd Hermetz. Nelson Westerhout. Alan Ros,er. DE Wnght. Ben Pope. Perry < 
Row) Jell Kane. David Turner. Tom Buckholts. Jody Huggms. Hugh Bailey. R,ch,e W,lhs. Leon Mason. J,m Cox. Jerry Grubba. Dan Re,U 3reg 
Bounds Kenny Hovet Jell McSwam (Sixth Row) Charles Hooks. Wendell Washmgton. Tom Johnson. Keith Mart,n. B,ll Warnern M,ke H 
Palasak. Chuck Ulford. Scott Brendle. Brian Whumire. Stan Khnger. Bob Coxe. Mark Hartman (Not P,ctured) Craig Bmkley. Mark Biackman. Jay 
Ganher. Jimmy Kinsey. Dwayne Lett. Tom McKean. James McLam. Ivan Reich. Shawn Stallord 



Sports 177 



Davidson's Search for Athletic 
Director Ends: Football to Become 
College's Only Intercollegiate 
Sport 



After College Athletic Director 
Eugene B. Bingham resigned, President 
Spencer appointed Head Football 
Coach Edward Farrell as Acting 
Director on 15 July 1981. Coach Farrell 
established stability within the athletic 
department. According to Tennis Coach 
Jeff Frank, "The place is running as 
smoothly as it has since the ten years 
I've been here. Everyone has respect 
for him because he's so organized. If 
Jesus Christ took over the job it would 
take Him two years to learn." Farrell 
also encouraged unity among 
department coaches. Coach Frank 
helped with non-revenue (minor) sports. 
Women's Basketball Coach Pat Miller 
oversaw women's athletics, and 
Baseball Coach George Greer took 
over some administrative duties. 

Farrell's enthusiasm extends to all 
Davidson sports. His first love remains 
football, but Farrell believes "the 
traditional success we have enjoyed in 
areas such as men's and women's 
tennis, women's field hockey and 
soccer indicates that there is a genuine 
opportunity in all areas for Davidson." 
Farrell's success as both Football 
Coach and Acting Athletic Director lead 
to the Board of Trustees' decision to 
appoint Farrell to the position of 
Athletic Director in March. ■ 




178 Sports 



Yearbook photographers fail to capture golf season on film 




This year the Davidson golf team 
consisted of six fine men coached by 
Thorn Cartmill. They played some 
matches — won some, lost a few — 
and had a really good time. They never 
got written up in the Davidsonian, and 
nobody seems to know the team 
record, but we think their unrecognized 
dedication to the sport deserves a 
hand. Tom Haller (left) takes a swing 
for the old black and red 

GOLF TEAM (Kneeling) Gary Schenk Coach 
Thorn Cartmill. Tom Haller (Stand j> Bob 
Whalen. Dave Lincoln. Todd Wiebusch, Mott 
Mcdonald 



Sports 179 



Rifle team shoots for the stars but falls shorts 



The Davidson rifle team suffered a 
somewhat disappointing 11-17 season, 
in spite of the performance of senior 
standouts Craig Rice, George Webster 
(below center), and others. The team 
took off to a promising start, winning 
four matches out of five in its first three 
meets, but underwent a midseason 
slump that lasted until January. A 
streak of wins in February ended the 
season on a promising note, however, 
for returning gunners Linda Cassens 
(right) and Doug Austin (bottom right). 
That is, if Austin survives the 
marksmanship of Webster and Cassens 
(below). 





RIFLE 






Won 11 Lost 17 




DAVIDSON 


2418 


Western Carolina 


2133 


Davidson 


2219 


Appalachain 


2720 


DAVIDSON 


2219 


Western Carolina 


2149 


DAVIDSON 


2491 


Citadel 


2461 


DAVIDSON 


2491 


Furman 


2209 


DAVIDSON 


1211 


Western Carolina 


1156 


Davidson 


1211 


Presbyterian 


1227 


Davidson 


1211 


Wake Forest 


1227 


Davidson 


1211 


Wofford 


1270 


Davidson 


1211 


Appalachian 


1354 


DAVIDSON 


1211 


SC State 


1124 


DAVIDSON 


1145 


SC State 


1145 


Davidson 


1145 


Furman 


1151 


Davidson 


1145 


Western Carolina 


1169 


Davidson 


1145 


Presbyterian 


1218 


Davidson 


1145 


Clemson 


1237 


Davidson 


1145 


Wofford 


1256 


Davidson 


1145 


Citadel 


1259 


Davidson 


1145 


Appalachian 


1329 


DAVIDSON 


2017 


Marshall 


1963 


DAVIDSON 


2017 


Western Carolina 


1961 


DAVIDSON 


2017 


Furman 


1805 


Davidson 


2017 


Citadel 


2032 


Davidson 


2017 


Tenn-Chattanooga 2037 


Davidson 


2017 


VMI 


2105 


Davidson 


2017 


Appalachain 


2161 


Davidson 


2017 


East Tennessee 


2290 


DAVIDSON 


2017 


Marshall 


1963 





RIFLE TEAM: (l-r) Doug Austin. Linda Cassens. Coach Lance Stell. George Hatfield. Jim Marshburn. 
Not Pictured: Elizabeth Brazell. Charles Griffith. Steve Lawrence. Craig Rice. George Webster. 






180 Sports 




Sports 181 



Davidson sailors harness the wind and breeze over Lake Norman 




With Lake Norman providing an 
excellent facility for hosting points 
regatta meets (far right), the Davidson 
Sailing Team was able to successfully 
take on rival state teams such as UNC 
and N.C. State as well as other schools 
in the South Atlantic Intercollegiate 
Sailing Association. Fortunately, the 
team was blessed with a large group of 
returning freshmen and sophomores, all 
of whom had gained extensive 
experience during the two seasons of 
the previous year and could enhance 
the team's competitive edge. Freshman 
add-on Raye Afford (above) balanced 
out the veteran group of sailors and 
contributed valuable boat-handling skills 
that will serve the team well in years to 
come. 

SAILING TEAM: (front) Eric Sanner. (second row) 
Bill Bankhead. Helen Thorpe. Ginger Holley. (third 
row) Kathleen Hull. Raye Allord. Margot Pearce. 
Mike Melt 




182 Sports 




Sports 183 



Hustling field and top notch coaching help Soccer Cats nail second place 




Throughout the 1981 season, the 
Soccer Cats employed an aggressive 
style of play, getting the best of highly 
touted rivals with teamwork, hustle, and 
opportunistic play. Junior co-captain 
Todd Lambert (above) demonstrates 
the fearless style which helped advance 
the team to second place as he view 
with an opponent for a headball. Such 
aggressiveness also drew fans; junior 
forward Hall Barnett (top right) utilizes 
his size as he challenges a Belmont- 
Abbey player. Nowhere, however, was 
there more rough and tumble action 
than in the box, where the Cats 
exhibited unequivocal prowess, primarily 
on the strength of goalie Mike 
lordanou's leaping reach (top left). 
Unfortunately, Mike's graduation will 
mark the close of the "Greek Era" in 
Davidson goaltending history. 



SOCCER TEAM (First Row) Hall Barnett. Terry Greiner, Pat Woodward. Manager Mimi Mauze. Mike 
lordanou. Mike Lufkin, Brian Hamilton. Brooks Babcock. (Second Row) Steve Bernhardt. Jim 
Magruder. Peter Burr. Dave Flowers, Paul Ray. Charles Coftey. Chuck Price. Jim Brueggemann. 
(Third Row) Chris Roberts. Gardner Roddey. Will Abberger. Dan Blood. Coach Charlie Slagle. Gene 
Hicks, Leif Johnston, John Peeples. C. K. Nichols. (Fourth Row) John Woodmansee. Bill Wahl. Mike 
Mauze. Jim Wright, Steve Marshall. Todd Lambert. John James. Alex McCallie. (Not Pictured) 
Steven Giles. Student Assistant Mike Lockwood. 



184 Sports 



The Davidson Soccer Team wrapped 
up its 196 1 season with its best record 
in ten years The team's 13-9 finish, 
when compared to the 0- 16 season of 
just four years ago. shows just how 
much the soccer program has 
progressed The team's improvement 
was most evident in conference play. 
as the Cats captured a second place 
berth with a dramatic win over Fur man. 
establishing a 6-2 record only topped 
twice in Wildcat history. For his efforts 
in bolstering the Davidson soccer 
program and for his display of genuine 
enthusiasm for the team coach Slagle 



was chosen as the Southern 
Conference Coach-ot-the-Year. 

Superior play on the field was a 
primary factor in the team's success as 
well. All Southern Conference first team 
honors were conferred on sophomore 
Chris Roberts (at left) for his heads-up 
offensive play and on senior goalkeeper 
Mike lordanou for his steady 
performance in the box. Admirable 
defensive play by senior sweeper Terry 
A. Greiner (bottom center) also won 
him a position on the All Conference 
second team. Although others were not 
elevated to all-star status, the 
performance of the team as a whole 
was nothing short of awesome. During 
the season, over twenty players scored 
or made assists and such aggressive 



play as they displayed by Todd 
L ambert (below), who tallied 9 goals 
and 3 assists, is certainly deserving of 
merit Such a depth of talent also 
enabled the Cats to come from behind 
on several occasions and secure three 
overtime wins, including a close contest 
with Pembroke State in which 
sophomore halfback Pete Burr (bottom 
left) drilled a penalty kick by the 
opposing goalie in the second overtime 
to ice the game and clinch the team's 
record for most wins in a season. In 
addition, a talent laden bench allowed 
Slagle to maintain a top-notch lineup 
on the field, thus permitting the Cats to 
maintain a winning policy of attrition. 






SOCCER 






Won 13 Lost 9 




DAVIDSON 


2 


Hampden-Sydney 


I 


DAVIDSON 


2 


High Point 


1 


Davidson 





NC State 


5 


Davidson 





Guilford 


3 


Davidson 





Appalachian 


2 


DAVIDSON 


7 


East Tennessee 


3 


DAVIDSON 


5 


Tusculum 





DAVIDSON 


3 


Western Carolina 


2 


Davidson 





Belmont Abbey 


1 


DAVIDSON 


3 


Washington & Lee 


1 


Davidson 





Wmthrop 


2 


DAVIDSON 


4 


UT-Chattanooga 


2 


Davidson 





Covenant 


3 


DAVIDSON 


1 


Citadel 





Davidson 


2 


Marshall 


3 


DAVIDSON 


3 


UNCC 


1 


DAVIDSON 


3 


VMI 





DAVIDSON 


3 


Presbyterian 


1 


DAVIDSON 


1 


Pembroke 





DAVIDSON 


2 


Furman 


1 


Davidson 


1 


South Carolina 


4 


Davidson 





Wake Forest 


1 



Sports 185 



Woe-Beset Swim Team Dissolves 



The 1981-82 Winter Sports season 
featured the frequent appearance of a 
number of well-shaven students on 
campus. Decked out in jeans and 
sporting unusually dry hair, these were 
the Davidson swimmers, their trunks 
tucked neatly away in dresser drawers 
because the team somehow failed to 
surface. According to Athletic Director 
Ed Farrell, the team was never officially 
disbanded nor its schedule ever 
officially eliminated. The swimmers 
themselves decided not to compete. 

Farrell said that the swimmers asked 
him and swim coach Pat Miller to 
attend a meeting before Christmas. The 
team had not yet held any meets, but 
team members decided that they 
"wanted to call off the season" after 
hearing there would probably not be a 
1983 team or any Christmas training 
trip to Florida. Team captain Mike 
Schremmer claimed that the swimmers 
quit "out of protest." 

Several factors were involved in the 
decision to cancel the 1983 team. 
Farrell cited the facility problem as the 
most serious factor; home meets were 
held at UNCC because the Davidson 
pool does not meet size regulations. 
This created a problem primarily 
because of expense; not only did the 
team incur pool rental fees for meets, 
but for diving practice as well. Farrell 
pointed out that having meets at UNCC 
also eliminated swimming from the list 
of spectator sports because few people 
travelled to Charlotte to watch. He also 
commented that it was getting harder 
to pin down UNCC for dates. 

Coach Miller concurred that the team 
"was not lost because of a group of 
kids quitting," but that "it basically got 
to be a problem with facilities." 
According to Miller, the swimming 
facilities at Johnston Gym are just not 
adequate to serve a competitive swim 
team's needs, with poor ventilation in 
the pool area being a particular 
problem. The quality of Davidson's 
swimming facilities had plagued her 
throughout the six years she coached 
the swim team. 

Farrell mentioned that another reason 
for the cancellation of the 1983 season 
lies in a recent NCAA change in 
division eligibility rules. Officials reduced 
the number of varsity sports a school 
must maintain in order to participate in 
Division I competition. Since Davidson 
has enough varsity teams to remain 
eligible excluding swimming, the athletic 
departmerv: decided to drop the sport, 
in view of he swim team's seemingly 



exceeding financial requirements. A 
number of other Southern Conference 
schools also decided to discontinue 
their swimming programs in 1983. 
The swimmers second bone of 
contention was the cancellation of the 
team's annual trip to Florida over 
Christmas vacation to train. Farrell, 
acting athletic director at the time, 
asserted that the trip "was not a luxury 
we could afford." Schremmer said the 
swimmers had been working out twice 
a day before Christmas. Yet, because 
the department called off the Florida 
trip, the majority of the swimmers had 
no place to practice during Christmas 
vacation. Schremmer added that the 
swimmers did not want to come back 
"half-assed". The reason for the team's 
decision not to compete was, as 
Schremmer put it, that "if we could not 
compete at our full potential, it wasn't 
worth swimming." Mike also pointed 
out that freshmen swimmers had lost 
motivation because they would not 
have a chance to improve themselves 
next year. 



Farrell commented that the 
swimmers' quitting "wasn't with my 
blessing, but I thought they had a 
point." Especially with regard to 
seniors, he "didn't agree with what they 
were doing," but thought it best not to 
make a big issue of it. According to 
Mike Schremmer, "everybody pretty 
much regrets it." He said he particularly 
regretted the situation when he saw 
what times other teams in the 
conference had compiled by the end of 
the 1982 season. With perhaps a hint 
of compunction Schremmer remarked, 
"We would've done well. They just 
could not realize the full potential that 
we have. There's a lot of wasted 
talent." ■ 




SHFAX'M \K[ 



186 Sports 



Wildcat swim team breaks off training, but students still part pool waters 



The swim team made its fateful 
decision not to compete prior to 
Christmas, so. following break, the 
swimming facilities were no longer in 
the full use. It seemed that serious 
swimming at Davidson had become 
past history Team members even toted 
the pool entrance door off to the 
cemetery and stood it among the 
headstones. However, the team's 
dissolution did not leave the pool in 
utter disuse. Though inconveniences 
such as poor ventilation and faulty 
filtering may have hampered 
intercollegiate level training, they failed 
to keep fitness-minded students away 
Availability of the pool in the afternoons 
enabled students to participate in 
swimming programs such as the trim 
swim class instructed by Felix Gerdes 
(below) or a hands-on lifesaving course 
(at left). The swimming facilities will suit 
the needs of the student body as is, 
but the loss of one of Davidson's 
winningest teams will be regretted 
nonetheless. 




Sports 187 



A young men's tennis team surpasses coach's expectations 



Jeff Frank, men's tennis coach since 
1973. figured his young 1982 team to 
finish fourth in the Southern Conference 
Tournament. The team, however, in 
spite of being plagued by injuries and 
inexperience during the season, took 
third in the tournament and ended the 
year with a 17-13 record. Davidson 
placed two players in the singles finals, 
senior Nevins Todd (bottom) and 
freshman Sedge Gray (right), while the 
# 3 doubles team of Gray and Phillip 
Crowder also made it to the finals. In 
the end, the team's special prowess on 
clay overcame their overall 
inexperience. Coach Frank pointed out 
an unusual situation in which three of 
the team's top six players, Gray, Shep 
Robinson, and John Hackett (below 
right), were freshman, who must cope 
with the added adjustment to a tough 



college schedule. Within the squad 
itself, competition was fierce during the 
season, with Gray, Todd, and 
sophomore Mark Nottingham (opposite) 
each vying for the # 1 position. The 
consistent play of Victor Taylor at #5 
(below), rounded out the top six 
singles. Doubles play suffered a distinct 
lack of consistency, with Coach Frank 
trying several different combinations. 
Nevertheless, the season concluded 
favorably for the team, who won six of 
their last seven matches leading into 
the Southern Conference Tournament, 
including a 5-4 upset win over 
Appalachian. The year's end saw the 
graduation of only one player, Nevins 
Todd, and Coach Frank off to Italy to 
coach the US Junior Tennis Team at 
the Italian Open. 





I 






188 Sports 








TENNIS 






Wor 


17 Lost 13 




DAVIDSON 


9 


West Chester 





Davidson 


2 


Atlantic Christian 


7 


Davidson 


2 


Penn state 


6 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Slippery Rock 


i 


DAVIDSON 


6 


Hampden-Sydney 





Davidson 


1 


North Carolina 


B 


Davidson 


1 


N C State 


B 


DAVIDSON 


e 


Wooster 


i 


Davidson 


1 


Wake Forest 


B 


DAVIDSON 


5 


VMI 


i 


DAVIDSON 


7 


Amherst 


? 


DAVIDSON 


e 


MIT 


1 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Ul-Chicago Circle 


1 


Davidson 


3 


Ohio U 


( 


DAVIDSON 


7 


East Stroudsburg 


2 


Davidson 


1 


Duke 


B 


Davidson 





Furman 


B 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Western Carolina 





Davidson 


2 


UT-Chattanooga 


7 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Vermont 


1 


Davidson 


4 


Wmthrop 


5 


Davidson 


4 


West Virginia 


5 


Davidson 





East Tennessee 


B 


DAVIDSON 


9 


UNCC 





Davidson 





South Carolina 


B 


DAVIDSON 


7 


Citadel 


2 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Marshall 


1 


DAVIDSON 


9 


J C Smith 





DAVIDSON 


8 


Pfeifter 


1 


DAVIDSON 


5 


Appalachian State 


4 



Third (9 teams) in Southern 
Conference Tournament 




TENNIS TEAM: (first row) Bill Bennett. Phillip Crowder. Nevms Todd. Manager Lisa Young. Coach Jeff Frank. John Hackett (secoi 
Sedge Gray. Mark Nottingham. Allen Lazenby. Shep Robinson. Tom Ratchford. Jeff Wall. Chip Fishback 



Sports 189 



Knobloch Becomes 
Davidson's First 
Female Ail-American 



Senior Emmy Knobloch, Davidson 
tennis standout for four years, topped 
off her collegiate career with one more 
first for the school's women's athletic 
program. Knobloch, an economics 
major from Atlanta, anchored the tennis 
team from the No. 1 singles position 
during all four of her years on the team, 
leading it to its first AIAW Division II 
state championship her freshman year 
(1979). The team earned the 
championship berth again in 1981 and 
1982, while Knobloch carried away top 
honors all four years. This year she 
defeated Susan Romeo of UNCC 6-1, 
6-3 to clinch the title. In doubles 



pairings, Knobloch and sophomore Sue 
Hilton took the No. 1 spot in a 7-5, 6-2 
victory over Romeo and Brown (UNCC). 
For her final triumph and a milestone 
for Davidson's women's athletics, 
Knobloch became the college's first 
female All-American by garnering fourth 
place honors in the AIAW national 
tournament in Colorado. Seeded fourth 
in the tournament, Knobloch was 
eventually defeated in the semi-finals by 
Sheri Dow of William and Mary, who 
went on to win the national title. 
Knobloch's four-year record at 
Davidson stands firm at 86-19. ■ 





190 Sports 



Women's tennis wins second consecutive state title 



*B± 


*^a^3? 


tV 


■■ 


^r ^H 


, 


W^M 




77)e Women's Tennis Team captured 
their fourth straight state title, led by 
strong performances in both singles 
and doubles Emmy Knobloch (tar left), 
grabbed first place in singles and 
doubles with partner Sue Hilton (left). 
Adelyn Lutz (bottom center), Adelaide 
Wilcox and Joanna Fleming (center), 
took fourth, fifth, and sixth place in 
singles competition, while Fleming 
paired with Tricia Ives (below), to place 
third in doubles action. The team ended 
the 1982 dual match season at 15-6, 
boosting Coach Pat Miller's eight 
season record to 95-36. Miller's 
success lies in varied doubles pairings 
according to opposition. 




T~" 


nfyj 


W2 


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Bl 'sJi' rvi w 





WOMEN'S TENNIS 






Won 15 Lost 6 




DAVIDSON 


9 


Queens 





Davidson 


4 


Furman 


5 


Davidson 


3 


Appalachian State 


6 


DAVIDSON 


8 


UNCC 


1 


DAVIDSON 


5 


Peace 


4 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Mars Hill 





DAVIDSON 





Lenoir-Rhyne 





Davidson 


1 


William & Mary 


8 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Skidmore 





DAVIDSON 


9 


UNC-Ashevilie 





DAVIDSON 


7 


Presbyterian 


2 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Winthrop 





DAVIDSON 


9 


Gardner-Webb 





Davidson 


3 


College ot Charleston 


6 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Atlantic Christian 





DAVIDSON 


6 


Guilford 


3 


Davidson 


4 


High Point 


5 


DAVIDSON 


8 


Winthrop 


1 


DAVIDSON 


5 


Peace 


4 


Davidson 


4 


Furman 


5 


DAVIDSON 


9 


Pfeifter 





NCAIAW Division II Slate Champions 





WOMEN'S TENNIS TEAM: (first row) Lessa 
McPhail. Eleanor Knobloch, Mary Grey Reddick. 
Mary Elizabeth Crantord. Trtda Ives Joanna 
Fleming, (second row) Sue H ' 
Knobloch. Sarah Patterscr - 
Catherine Smith 



Sports 191 



Women tracksters spurred by a crop of fine runners 



In spite of the individual nature of track 
competition, there remains a strong 
team element to the sport. A team 
must have depth and a well rounded 
attack in order to succeed. The 1982 
women's track team, in particular, 
reflected this understanding, as the 
Lady Cat competitors performed 
consistently well throughout the season 
primarily on the strength of team efforts 
in relay events and paced distance 
runs. Marian Hill's second place finishes 
in the 5000m and 10,000m races at 
the Davidson Relays (lead runner at 
right) exemplified this strength. Similar 
strong performances came from the 
fine relay teams put together from a 
large pool of runners, including Melissa 
Page, Jean Webb, Elizabeth Hargrove 
(at right; lefthand runner), Tamara 
Foreman (at right; center), Susan 
Dresser, and Laura Hills (below). 





MEN'S TRACK 
Won 1 Lost 4 


Davidson 68 Washington & Lee 77 
Davidson 20 Appalachian State 153 
Davidson 62 Lynchburg 70*/2 
DAVIDSON 62 Voorhees 40 l / 2 
6th (9 teams) in Southern Conference Meet 
9th (18 teams) in Davidson Relays 




WOMEN'S TRACK 
Won 2 Lost 1 


Davidson 44 Appalachian State 76 
DAVIDSON 67 Lynchburg 46 
DAVIDSON 67 Voorhees 45 
5th (11 teams) in Davidson Relays 





WOMEN'S TRACK TEAM: (on steps) Sally Howell. Kara Gilmore. (second row) Jean Webb. Nancy 
Bondurant, PJ Whitlock. Tamara Foreman, Coach Lisa Boyer, Melissa Page. Susan Dresser, (third 
row) Mike Frankhouser. Sharon Bryant. Laura Hills: 



192 Sports 



Losing record belies strong individual performances in mens track 





MENS TRACK TEAM (sealed) David Slosur, Randy McManus. Alec Drlsklll. Andy Harrison. Sieve 
Bernhardt Clark Carter. Dan Voorhis (first row) Frank Ivey. Jack Smith. Howard Browne. John 
Hoots Jim Trotter Lanny Smith. Dan Lmdsey (second row) Coach Sterling Martin. Jim Shaw. John 
Malone Jell Carter Brian Bros!. James Gelly. Lance Sisco. Ed Henderson. Coach Charlie Slagle 



Though none of the runners on the 
men's track team set new records, as 
freshman Jeff Carter notched a new 
high jump mark, their performances 
deserve high acclaim. Leading the men 
in the lane events was Lance Sisco. 
who capped his Senior year with a 
victory in the 1 10m high hurdles at 
Southern Conference finals. Lance was 
high point man for the team and was 
backed by a lineup of fine sprinters, 
including Brian Brost. Dan Voorhis. Dan 
Lmdsey, and Jim Shaw. However, the 
heart of the men's team was its middle 
distance runners. The oldest of the 
group was Randy McManus (above: 
leading Davidson man), but he was 
followed closely by Frank Ivey (above: 
second Davidson man) and Jack Smith. 
Commendable performances were also 
turned in by the 800m men: John 
Hoots. James Gelly, and Dave Stosu 
In the steeplechase. Danny Arm 
(top left) managed to complei 
season without getting his left shoe 
wet. 



Sports 193 



Strong individual showings fail to help Wildcat Ten pin down winning record 



The Wildcat Ten's 1981-82 season 
proved to be somewhat of a 
disappointment. However, though the 
team did not turn in a winning record, 
Coach Bob Estock was pleased with 
the way his wrestlers performed on the 
individual level. Estock especially lauded 
the efforts of senior captain Scott 
Smith, whose four year career at 
Davidson has been an outstanding 
asset to the program. Smith was able 
to bounce back from a knee injury he 
suffered during his junior year and 
chalk-up a 15-8 record for the season. 
Estock also commended junior Chris 
Tiernan (at right) for the determination 
and skillful grappling which helped him 
finish fourth in his weight class at the 
Southern Conference Tournament. The 
lineup was bolstered by three strong 
freshmen (Tom Oddo, Mike Keely, and 
Bob McCullen) as well. The three saw 
needed experience during the season 
and progressed admirably, with Tom 
Oddo making key contributions as he 
led the team in takedowns. Sophomore 
John Breidenstine (below) also 
exhibited some fine wrestling for the 
Cats, capturing a number of key wins 
with his fierce style, including a 55 
second pin of a Pfeiffer opponent. 





194 Sports 




>IG TEAM (Front ft ■■■ 
!h. Mike Keely (Second R ■ 
McCullen. Lance Stokes. John Breic- 
Tiernan ( Third Row) Stan Klingei. John > ■ 
Tom Hissam. Mike Harbert. Coach Bob I 





WRESTLING 




Won 6 Lost 12 Tied 1 




Davidson 


20 


Catawba 


22 


DAVIDSON 


30 


Pfeifter 


24 


DAVIDSON 


36 


. 'one 


15 


Davidson 


6 


South Carolina 




Davidson 


22 


Pembroke State 


25 


DAVIDSON 


42 




6 


Davidson 





Citadel 


32 


Davidson 


27 


Pleitter 


27 


Davidson 


12 


Citadel 


32 


Davidson 


10 


Appalachian 


36 


DAVIDSON 


34 


Furman 


12 


Davidson 


12 


VMI 


33 


DAVIDSON 


30 


PteiMer 


18 


Davidson 


12 


Elon 


26 


DAVIDSON 


20 


Hampden-Sydney 


15 


Davidson 


18 


Elon 


19 


Davidson 


14 


Citadel 


32 


Davidson 


4 


Appalachian 


43 


Davidson 


16 


Campbell 






Following the 1980-8 1 season, the 
outlook for the 1982 team was 
encouraging, as several potentially fine 
wrestlers promised to return. However, 
by the time 1982 arrived, the Wildcat 
Ten had lost many of these key 
wrestlers, primarily to injuries and 
academic attrition. Thus, the team was 
thankful three football players had 
joined their ranks to fill some of the 
weight classes that had been left 
vacant. Sophomore gridiron fullback 
Tom Hissam (above) was a particular 
surprise in the 177 lb. category and he 
picked up a number of valuable wins 
for the Cats. Though in need of more 
experience and wrestling know-how. 
sophomore tackle Mike Harbert (at left) 
and lettering junior lineman Stan Klinger 
performed satisfact 
and HWT slots respectively. 



Sports 195 



Cheerleaders, hampered by dropouts, inexperience, maintain high level of 



Cheerleading squad member George 
Thompson (center), might feel like Atlas 
holding the world upon his shoulders as 
he struggles through ten hours of 
practice per week and a rigorous 
training camp during the summer. Next 
year only five experienced members will 
remain on the cheerleading squad, but 
their problems may be fewer than this 
year's squad since Coaches Hussey 
and Farrell took a new interest in the 
group when they judged tryouts this 
springs. Counterclockwise from below, 
Leesa McPhail cheers at a football 



game, and Marni Crosby, astride John 
Storey, performs a basic skate. 
Basketball season was also included in 
the agenda, and Patti Long encourages 
the Wildcat team and fans with a 
pompom routine. Performing the needle 
stunt, Patti Bates and Rob lies brave 
cold weather to rile up spirit for the 
football team. The Wildcat mascot, 
alias Doug Am mar, takes a breather 
during a home basketball game. Tying 
up their performance for the day, the 
squad joins arms and sings the Alma 
Mater. 





196 Sports 



performance 




Sports 197 



Steve Soud criticizes Davidson fans for lack of support 



Is the Davidson fan becoming extinct? 
Steve Soud, sports editor for the 
Davidsonian, apparently thinks so. In 
his "From the Locker Room" series of 
February 1982, Soud writes: "Davidson 
crowds really upset me sometimes. Part 
of the crowd thinks it's a museum they 
walked into . . . Another part of the 
crowd theorizes basketball is a direct 
descendent of ballet and should be 
viewed with the same dignity. A third 
part comes fully prepared for a cocktail 
party . . . and spends the time 
socializing." He does, however, 
commend an estimated 35-40 hardcore 
fans, citing the PIKA contigent as a 
case in point. Soud's reaction stems 
from a poor turnout at the UT-C 
basketball game over Midwinters 
weekend. Junior PIKA Steve Shield also 
wrote to the newspaper: "Basketball 
games may as well be included in the 
Artist Series." Well, that's one opinion. 
But there are about 30 fans in the pep 
band alone (opposite) who say 
differently. Eric Weiss (lower right) is 
one volunteer, while band member 
David Fryman gets a helping hand from 
Randy Sellers (right). Other fans also 
see athletic events as special 
occasions. Charles Douglas and date 
Laura Turnburke (opposite) get decked 
out for the Homecoming game. Hall 
counselor Steve Stine (below) and 2nd 
East show a little spirit in the best red 
and black tradition. 





198 Sports 




Sports 199 



Coaches sympathetic to fans academic, social committments 



With the time they put into studying 
and working, many students find 
attending sports events difficult. 
According to Coach Hussey, the staff 
tries to coordinate games and meets 
properly so that they do not conflict 
with Union-scheduled activities. 
Although Hussey agrees that students 
are committed to academic excellence 
and thus must study, he also feels they 
should support school teams: "Show 
you can do two things and do them 
well. " Angie Horn and Bruce Wallace 
(below), combine the two by studying 
during halftime of a soccer game. In 
early spring other students (bottom 
center), mix watching a track meet with 
catching some sun. The football game 
of Homecoming Weekend brings out 
the enthusiasm of fans Gordon Turnbull 
(right), and a young Wildcat (bottom 
right), and also brings together 
fraternity brothers Stan Hynds and 
Scott Smith (far right). 





200 Sports 




Sports 201 



Arduini, Farrell receive permanent appointments 



In the 198 1- 1982 school year, the 
Athletic Department saw not only 
achievements by its players but also by 
its staff. Vince Arduini served as part- 
time assistant football coach and 
wrestling assistant for the past three 
years. With Coach Miller's departure. 
Arduini replaces him as defensive 
football coach. In addition, Coach 
Estock took over more football duties, 
and Arduini thus became Davidson's 
wrestling coach. Edward Farrell, Acting 
Athletic Director since July of 1981, 
received an "indefinite" or permanent 
appointment to this position over spring 
break. During the summer Jeff Frank 
coached the United States Junior 
Tennis Team at the Italian Open Junior 
Championships held in Milan. In 
appreciation of the Davidson Athletic 
Department, Howard Covington, Class 
of 1937, donated $200,000 worth of 
property to the school. Because of his 
interests in golf and tennis, Covington 
assignated $50,000 for these two 
sports. Plans include the construction 
of a 300 yard long practice hole near 
the baseball field to be used for team, 
P.E. and recreational purposes. 




Lisa Boyer 

Head Coach. Women's Track; 

Assistant Coach. Women's 

Basketball 



John W. Byrd 
Equipment Manager 




Thomas A. Cartmill 

Professor of Physical Education; 

Golf Coach 




Thomas William Bond Couch 
Assistant Director of Athletics and 
Head Trainer 



202 Sports 




Edward G Farrell 

Head Director ol Athletics 



Sports 203 



Pat Miller leaves in wake of continued success 



One of the Athletic Department's 
greatest losses next year will be Pat 
Miller. Her success at Davidson's 
Swimming included being twice named 
Southern Conference Coach of the 
Year. As the women's tennis coach, 
Miller tallied up 8 winning seasons with 
an overall record of 95-36 and a 1981- 
1982 record of 15-6. Baseball Coach 
Charlie Slagle was also named 
Southern Conference Coach of the Year 
with a record of 13-9 overall and 6-2 in 
the Southern Conference. Selected by 
the Amateur Basketball Association of 
the United States, Bobby Hussey 
coached the South Asian Team in pre- 
Olympic competition. This team is one 
of five amateur teams in Taiwan, Korea 
and Hong Kong. 




Deirdre A. Mayes 

Head Coach. Women's Field hocke 

and Basketball 



204 Sports 




James C Sypult 
Assistant Football Coach 



Sports 205 



Ruggers show guts, shed blood, and go for the gusto 




The Davidson College Rugby Football 
Club is a fraternal order of suicidal 
maniacs dedicated to the principle that 
consumption of beer to the saturation 
point and the preservation of Rugby as 
a true art form are the two greatest 
endeavors to be undertaken by college 
students. In the fall season the Club 
played five matches and was scheduled 
to play the same number in the spring. 
Although the team failed to capture any 
honors in the fall, succumbing to such 
teams as those from UNC Greensboro 
and N.C State, enthusiasm was high 
and all of the matches were hard 
battled. The closest and most heart- 
breaking match was played against the 
Belmont- Abbey Rugby Football Club 
(BARF for short), a contest in which a 
last second "try" (a Rugby touchdown) 



gave Abbey a 10-9 victory over the 
Cats. Despite such losses, and the 
rought-and-ready ruggers continued to 
exhibit their characteristic preparedness 
to sacrifice their bodies for the sake of 
the sport and the glory of the team. 
Their motto: "Give Blood — Play 
Rugby!!" Such gutsy determination 
shows in the face of Todd "Dixie" 
Kimsey as he bowls over an opponent 
with teammates Jeff Wright and David 
Short in close pursuit (at right). This 
lack of concern for flesh and bone is 
offset, however, by a reverence for the 
game-ball, which Todd Thomson grasps 
with care as he keeps an eye out for 
teammates in the open (above) just as 
scrambling players fix their eyes on the 
same bloated pigskin (bottom). 




RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB: Doug Ammar. 
Geoff Andrews. Dan Barker. Taylor Bowen. 
Jim Brueggemann'. Tom Clark. Jerry Cook. 
Lund Easlerling. John Ferguson. Jay Gaither. 
Rich Glaze. Hunter Gourley. Terry Gremer. Ed 
Henderson'. Todd Kimsey. Tom Leonard, Tim 
Lorezen. Eric Long, Joe McMullen. Bob 
Mosca. Mike Noble. David Osborne. David 
Short, Pete Skillern. Steve Stine. Todd 
Thompson. Nick Tsantes. Mike Washburn. Jeff 
Wright. Theo Wright. (' — co-captains) 




206 Sports 



Short-clad Davidson men wield sticks on IMAC fields 




With spring comes the advent of 
lacrosse season and the frequent 
appearance of helmets, sticks, pads, 
and muddy cleats in the dorm hallways. 
Lacrosse is a rough sport and 
sometimes one can see spots of blood 
intermingled with the mud on a players 
equipment. But that doesn't deter the 
Davidson men. as they don their gear 
and brave stick-wielding opponents in 
what else but their shorts. 



Sports 207 



Waterskiers whoop it up 



The proximity of Lake Norman to the 
campus affords students the 
opportunity to hone their skiing skills 
and enjoy hot-dog antics as well. It has 
also encouraged an enterprising group 
of ski fanatics to organize a club team, 
which has proven itself successful in 
intercollegiate competition. 




208 Sports 



Riding club off on the right hoof 




Only recently formed, the Riding Club is 
one of the less familiar organizations at 
Davidson. However, the club is firmly 
entrenched and competes in shows on 
the intercollegiate level, making 
frequent use of the college stables for 
practice. Seniors Jeanme Mclntyre (top 
left) and Carrie Nunn (top right) make a 
leisurely circuit around the ring, as 
junior Felix Gerdes takes a jump (left) 
Taking proper care of one's mount 
also an important, if less j amorous, 
part of the program. Julie Cheney 
(above) sees to the needs of her 
charge. 



Sports 209 



Frats Hunt IMAC Stars 



It seems every winter we hear about 
sports recruiting. Basketball wants a 
guy 6'8" whose vertical is 42". Football 
wants a 250 lb. nose guard who can 
bench press 400. Such are the affairs 
of the Athletic Department. Instead, 
let's talk about big time recruiting — 
IMAC. After all IMAC is as close to "Big 
Time" as most of us will get. Each 
year, under the guise of seeking 
variegated pledge classes, the local 
fraternities attempt to lure the top 
freshman players into their social scene. 

In the past the fraternities have 
offered lavish gifts in hopes of 
attracting freshmen. One Pike promised 
a foosball table or bathtub to every 
tailback who would bolster the f rat's 
backfield. The Phi Delts recruit most 
heavily; unfortunately the Wildcat Club 
prefers to see their investment at work 
in the Varsity program rather than on 
the IMAC fields. 

The year 1980 was a banner year for 
freshman flickerball, as three freshman 
teams, the Bushwhackers, Coming 
East, and Much Later, broke the top 

(Right) Dave "Otis" Rowe stretches out 
before the big game in typical 
flickerball attire. (Below) Mark Murrey 
of the Skanatics catches a touchdown 
pass in tournament action. 



eight. The results of last year's rush 
were evident in this year's final 
standings. In 198 1, the # 1 Rastros 
were all upperclassmen, but the #2 
SAEs started two sophomores, 
including Ben Williams of Coming East. 
Most notable, however, was the 
predominatly sophomore #3 team, 
Ebenezer Baptist Church, led by Clark 
Carter and several other Bushwhacker 
and Much Later alumni. The # 4 KAs 



played with alums of those two halls as 
well, and the #5 Pikes were helped by 
the addition of sophomore tailback 
Mike Adams. But 1981 provided scarce 
fare for pledge chairmen and team 
captains, as only one freshman team 
broke the Top Ten. Next year is likely 
to see the frats hungry for players, as 
this year graduates a number of key 
men without players of quality available 
to move up in the ranks.M 





210 Sports 



Frat and hall teams face off for IMACtion 



omSuM 






FLICKERBALL 




Final Standings 


Men 




Women 


1 Raslros 




1 Amazons 


2SAE 




2 Highway 1 


3 EBC B' Team 


3 Last Chance 


4 KA Gold 




4 Filthy Rich 


5 Pikes 




5 Triple Threat 


6Skanatics 




6 Doubly Rich 


7 Hooter Hunters 


7 Star Bellied Sneeches 


8SPE 




8 Basement Belles 


9 Deep Throw 
10 I Phelta Thi 




9 Three For All 







(Above left) The defending champ 
Amazons take the line against Triple 
Threat of 3rd Rich, while Mike Goode 
(above center) kicks into high gear in 
the open field. (Above right) Mike 
Kelley runs of reliable — the option 
play — against the Hooter Hunters as 
referee Stokes Peebles keeps his eyes 
on the play, (At Left) Suzanne Dickey, 
of regular season champ Filthy Rich, 
turns on the juice to beat a pursuer. 



Sports 211 



IMAC cagers get physical as they are egged on from the sidelines 



Every year, the IMAC b-ball leagues 
seem to incorporate more and more 
teams and there are currently over 
twenty teams in each league. Of 
course, the competition has only been 
getting fiercer and, aside from 
occasional horseplay, most of the 
teams seem like they are out to play 
some serious, heads-up ball. Not only 
are the IMAC cagers a determined lot, 
but their ranks are rife with talented 
athletes as well and we may yet see 
the day when their skills call for 
intercollegiate level competition 
amongst top intramural teams, as the 
UNCC tournament suggested. 






212 Sports 




On Woman's IMAC 

1982 women's IMAC play saw the 
continuation of high level competition 
three teams in particular deserving of 
commendation. Loitering With Intent, a 
team of veterans from women's 
intercollegiate play, was a strong 
contender for the league title, but was 
dealt losses in both regular season and 
playoff games by Last Chance and the 
freshmen of 2nd Richardson. Second 
Rich was undefeated entering the finals, 
having dealt Last Chance a one point 
loss in January, their only defeat of the 
season. But the "cocky seniors." with 
the help of 3 baskets by Karen "Bob" 
Welty scored in the opening minutes of 
the game, took an early 8-0 lead and 
maintained possesion throughout to win 
it all. Junior Marie Cefalo directed the 
team from the point position in what 
turned out to be a very physical game. 
Standouts for 2nd Rich included Annie 
Porges. Kara Gilmore. and hall 
counselor Catherine Smith. 



Sports 213 



Old Men nab bragging rights in /MAC net action; students put to shame 




From a collection of minds from the 
History, Political Science, Religion, and 
(most importantly) Physics departments 
what more can you expect but a 
winning volleyball team? Need I say 
more? 



214 Sports 



Shirtless heroes afield 




Every spring witnesses the beating of 
new base paths and the development 
of sunken batter's boxes on those 
familiar backwoods IMAC fields. On go 
the headbands and the ball-gloves, and 
off go the shirts, as motley crews of 
closet superstars assault the makeshift 
diamonds bordering the cross-country 
trail. With them comes the lively 
atmosphere that makes IMAC such a 
relieving study break. Indeed, except 
for the risk of injury from sliding into 
third base and the possibility of rain. 
Softball provides a great opportunity for 
students to catch some rays. 



Sports 215 



ho says Davidson 





* « 



<v 



J 



l^^^fc*'-w»\-*-" tUBr* 


^it 


IN 


w 






&fc? 



students aren't diverse? There are some really weird people around here." 

Weird or not — the choice is yours — 
one cannot deny the basic 
homogeneity of the Davidson 
student body with regard to 
socio-economic background. This 
can have drawbacks, for as 
Cypriot Melis Nicolaides reminds, 
"The best education doesn't 
come from the classroom, but 
from interaction with others." 
But in other ways the similarities 
between the students contribute 
to the feeling of junior P.J. 
Whit lock that "Davidson's 
students are her best assets. The Da 
first thing I noticed when I visited ma 
here as a prospective was that enc 

people would say hello to me. act 

, Up north you walk with your tov 

head down." It is this sense of ina 

! interest in others that attracts as 

most students to Davidson. The am 
things one remembers aren't the re\> 
dates of that Rubens' altarpiece ■* 
or Walt Whitman's eight editions coi 
of Leaves of Grass, but the Th 

i feelings he gets from the Fie 

students here. For the most part cei 
they are a group of concerned Be 

and caring individuals, willing to in , 
help you when needed, willing to dei 
stay up with you to talk. This An 

spirit of camaraderie inspires (bt 

Melis to add, "I feel at home ap { 

even though I'm a foreigner co, 

here." ■ ^ 



A 




Davidson students come in 
many shapes and sizes, and 
engage in many different 
activities. Although we tend 
towards mass labeling, 
individual performances such 
as those by "prep" Tom Walker 
and "ROTC" Sara Ross (far left) 
reveal striking diversity 
within groups. Whether in 
couples, as evidenced by Mark 
Thomas/ Margaret Ervin and Marc 
Fields/Elena Paul (below 
center), in mobs — see First 
Belk West at left, or merely 
in amiable groupings as 
demonstrated by Andy Brown, 
Ann Hurt, and Ann Rollins 
(below), Davidson students 
appear to enjoy each others 
company, perhaps the most 
severe test of any group. 





It is the same in every college 
town. Though the stillness in the air 
is misleading, the ever present brick 
buildings hide a flurry of activity. 
Last minute details receive attention 
as the place becomes ready for 
another year and the new faces it 
will bring. Like most colleges, 
Davidson realizes that starting 
college can be trying, even 
traumatic. But unlike many colleges, 
Davidson seeks to treat the tension 
before it becomes a problem. So the 
college has come upon a remedy to 
help ease the madness. The brilliant 
scheme, known as Freshman 
Orientation, involves rushing the 
freshmen from activity to activity. 
"Sap their energy and 
they can't be nervous," claim 
the people in charge. 

Each fall, a few days befor3 those 
seasoned upperclassmen emerge on 
the scene, the freshmen arrive. 
Quickly taken under the wings of his 
hall counselors, the Freshman begins 
a seemingly endless stream of 
discussions, lectures, and parties. For 
half a week, Davidson is the 
Freshman's own private heaven and 
hell. From morning to night, hall 
cunselors usher him to and from 
activities ranging from the mandatory 
Honor Code lecture (that informs 
him, now that he has just arrived 
how very easy he might be asked to 
leave), to the original M*A*S 
movie. Very soon, the new 
Davidsonian feels at home with his 
hallmates, through functions such as 
the regatta and tug-of-war. He 
becomes acquainted with other 



Freshman Orientation 81 

Volume 87 Of 

The Davidson Experience 



freshman faces through the ever 
present Wildcat Handbook and 
popular events like the People Hunt 
and the infamous "Mixer." Still more 
countenances shine down on the 
Freshman — President Spencer, 
Dean Terry, and Chalmers Davidson 
all add their bit to the pile of 
information the bewildered Freshman 
has accumulated. Of course, hall 
counselors and advisors are always 
close at hand to battle over the 
Freshman's schedule. On occasion, a 
benevolent junior will steer him clear 
of taking Cnem 31 simultaneously 
with Physic 41 and Humes, as this 
schedule would leave no time for 
flickerball practice. 

When asked near the end of their 
first year what they thought of it, 
most of a random sampling of 
freshmen paused and smiled as they 
tried to remember that whirlwind 
week. Typical of the comments were 

lose made by the freshman women. 

uren Smith believed "it was fun, 

i\ it was tiring, we met so many 

new people that one really didn't 

t anyone. I got really tired of 

niling." Hannah Moore agreed: 



"They made us do too much. We 
didn't even have time to sweep the 
floor." 

Though most of the people polled 
rated Freshman Orientation a good 
and worthwhile experience, some felt 
they were on display. These 
freshmen may well have felt eyes on 
theri backs, since a number of 
upperclassmen, having enjoyed their 
own orientations so much, cut their 
summers short in order to watch a 
new generation of freshmen run in 
the Cake Race and flounder at the 
Dizzy-Lizzy. 

Upperclassmen seemed to view 
this year's crop of freshmen in a 
favorable light. Sophomore David 
McCurry said that "they seem to 
have more self-esteem than we had 
then." Sophomore Ed Daugherty 
called them the usual motley crew," 
while sophomore George Strickland 
found the group "kinda cute." From 
veteran Bob Buchanen, an 
experienced junior came the 
sentiment that incoming classes are 
becoming progressively brighter. "It 
was good to see a lot of them not 
make the same mistakes I did." ■ 



218 Freshmen 



It was a bumper crop 



Soon after coming to Davidson, 
freshmen are put to the test in more 
than just academics Before crowds of 
jeering uppei classmen. Sarah Patterson 
(bottom center), and Chuck Lampley 
(below), race ahead of their opponents 
in the final hundred feet of the Cake 
Race. In another embarrassing event, 
members of First Center West (far left), 
try organizing themselves before the 
race starts at the Freshman Regatta, 
while Bud Aiken (bottom right), relishes 
the moment of his team's victory. 
Warren Gould (left), demonstrates his 
social skills with Elizabeth Elkin at the 
Activities Fair. 




Freshman 219 



Raye Alford 
Kathleen Anderson 
Miles Ardaman 
Garry Banks 
Meg Barron 
Rebecca Bales 
Mark Batten 



Steve Bernhardt 
Bill Bigger 
Charles Blake 
Diana Bohrer 
Joe Bossong 
David Boulware 
Taylor Bowen 



Scott Brady 
Ladson Brearley 
Benjamin Brendle 
Leslie Brown 
Rhett Brown 
Pat Bryant 
James Brueggemann 



Tom Buckholts 
Amy Burton 
Dianne Bydum 
Earl Byers 
Nathan Caldwell 
William Cardwell 
Blake Carpenter 



Sheila Carr 
Keg Carter 
Lisa Cash 
Linda Cassens 
Chienwen Yu 
Kathy Clark 
Lloyd Clark 



Ruth Clark 
Carlton Clinkscales 
John Cobb 
Bob Coe 
Paul Coggins 
Jenny Cooper 
Tom Crooke 



Catherine Crosland 
Paige Dalton 
David Dendy 
Tim Desieno 
Craig Detweiler 
Tony Dick 
Mandy Dotson 



Walker Douglas 
Tricia Drake 
Susan Dresser 
John Driggers 
Katherine Dudley 
Elmer Dyke 
Elizabeth Elkin 




220 Freshman 





Basement Richardson 

(first row) Clare Eckert, Cindy Clark, 
Caroline Rumley. Beth Maczka, Carol 
Roche, Lucy Everett, (second row) 
Hannah Moore. Valerie Hinton, Janet 
Morris, Susan Fore. Lisa Thomas. Lauren 
Smith. Tricia Ives. Lisa Lano 



First Richardson 

(first row) Laura Hassell. Cari Shulman. 
Atondra Williams. Catherine Crosland, 
Leslie Brown, Fran Gibson, Mary Sorum, 
Meg Barron, Meg Kimbirl, Roxanna 
Guilford, Laurie Keif, Elizabeth Wintermute, 
Amy Crittenburger, Ruthie Farrior, Susan 
Campbell, Kristin Hills, Laura Williams, 
Denise Ferguson, Paige Marsh, Susie 
Myers, (second row) Sarah Hall, LaVonda 
Gorham, Kathy Clark, Mary Shaffer, Sarah 
Dysart, Kristine White. 



n Second Richardson 



(first row) Reaves Robinson, Katherine 
Dudley, Margaret Chaffin, Kathleen 
Anderson, Lisa Cash, Elena Paul, 
Elizabeth Brooks, (second row) Katherine 
Smith, Mary Vanhare. Sallie Robinson, 
Jenny Cooper, Kathy Gratto, Julie 
Morhsett, Sarah Patterson, Mandy Dotson, 
Laura Taft, Rebecca Bates, Mimi Mauze. 
(third row) Elizabeth White. Meg Surratt. 
Melissa Page, Leila ni Hamilton, Martha 
Nelson, Ross Thayer, Keg Carter. Carolyn 
Leavitt. (fourth row) Elisabeth Hargrove, 
Jean Webb, Laura Turnburke, Kara 
Gilmore, Anne Porges. 



Fourth Richardson 

(first row) Diana Bohrer, Lisa Herrard, 
Laura McDonald, Julie Stauffer, Elizabeth 
Elkin, Paige Dalton, Mary Grey Reddick, 
Linda Cassens, Jennifer Steans, Mercedes 
Oglukian, Joanne Stryker. Terri Benner. 
(second row) Lou Hamilton, Martha Yeide, 
Mitzi Short, Suzy Hohman. Susan Moore, 
Kerry Holbrook, Ruth Clark, Anhe 
Lofquist, Heather Jameson, Susan 
Kaufmann, Betsy Johnson, Amy Burton, 
Anne Morgan, Lynn Logan, Anne Miano, 
Kathy Gringrich, Jodie Kinnett. 

Freshman 221 



Let them eat cake 



They had only been here a week, but 
the freshman class already lines up (top 
right), in the annual Cake Race where 
the fastest runners get their choice of 
homemade cakes and pies. Still hungry 
even after a Commons' meal (below), 
David Snyder and Steve Bernhardt 
(bottom right), mix up a chocolate cake 
right on their dirty dorm floor. Members 
of First Richardson (far top right), let 
Gus's do the cooking as they inhale 
several large pizzas. Despite the limp 
green beans Elizabeth White (bottom 
center right), finds on her plate, the 
Commons did stage a fantastic pig 
picking where Susan Kaufmann (far 
bottom right), gets a taste of hot pork 
and fresh watermelon. 



r 




Barry Elledge 
Harding Erwin 
Brad Essman 
Edwin Evans 
Thomas Evans 
Lucy Everett 
Rob Farley 



222 Freshman 




KitfiA 



■M»i<'>iO>if, y 



Ruthie Famor 
Brian Flanagan 
Susan Fore 
Ted Garner 
Fran Gibson 
Kara Gilmore 
Kathy Gingrich 



Freshman 223 




Norman Gordon 
La Vonda Gorham 
Warren Gould 
Hunter Gourley 
Kathy Gratto 
Mary Griffin 
Charles Griffith 



If you've seen one, you 
haven't seen them all 

As Americans began to pay more 
attentions to their physical condition, 
they concurrently became interested in 
seeing how their fellow man shaped up. 
Ross Thayer (left), enthusiastically 
agrees that surfing sure paid off for two 
firm-derriered males. While Ross prefers 
them tall and thin, an anonymous artist 
quickly sketched his/her idea of the 
perfect male figure, big and muscular 
(far left). As part of an Anatomy 
course, Gary Sleznick (below), shows 
he understands the difference betwen 
anterior and posterior. Whatever the 
terminology, where can I find one of 
those surfers? 




224 Freshmen 



£ 



HULL* ft 



Claire Groves 
Roxanna Gulltord 

Hall 



'.imilton 
Mary Hamilton 




Shirin Hanali 
Mary Hare 
Elisabeth Hargrove 



Judy Harrell 
Charles Harrison 



Thurston Hatcher 
Bill Heard 
Robert Heglar 



Laura Helmus 
Edward Henderson 
Lauren Highlower 



Valerie Hinton 
Kerry Holbrook 
Rod Holman 



John Holt 
Ross Holt 
Rick Horlbeck 



Sarah Howell 
Scott Huie 
Christopher Humphreys 



Freshmen 225 



First Center East Belk 

(first row) Ivan Reich, Robert Deaton, Jon 
Hain, Ken Boyer. (second row) Gray 
Hampton, Jay Gaither, Scott Brady, 
William Turlington, Mike Mason, Timothy 
McGaughey, John Toler, Murray Simpson, 
(third row) John Driggers, Matt Webb, 
Paul Ladue, Hunter Roddey. 



First Center West Belk 

(first row) Dan Juengst, Tom Schember, 
Forrest Ranson, David Sisk, Dan Plaut, 
Rob McCormack. (second row) Chris 
Fromm, Hans Jensen, Marvin Overby, Billy 
Sullivan, Bob McCullen, Dave Thomas, 
Pete Skillern. 



First East Belk 

(first row) John McGuirt, John McColl, 
Shep Robinson, John Syme, John Parker, 
(second row) Ellis Tinsley, Garry Banks, 
Mike Keeley, Tom Buckholts, Kirk 
Kirkpatrick. (third row) David McGee, 
Miles Ardaman, Jerry May. (third row) 
James Rogers, Bob Coxe, Brad Mullis, 
Howard Ringer, Blake Carpenter, Robert 
Heglar, Earl Byers. 



Ann Hunter 
Tricia Ives 
Ken Jaegers 
John James 
Heather Jameson 
Gus Jamison 
Hans Jensen 



Betsy Johnson 
Sid Jones 
Dan Juengst 
Susan Kaulmann 
Mike Keeley 
Lorelei Keif 
Jim Kemper 




226 Freshmen 




iilifi'iiimAm 

PAHA 




Second East Belk 

(first row) Dan Ryan. Edwin Evans. John 
Peebles. Scott Huie. Pat Bryant (second 
row) Bill Swift, William Weatherspoon, 
Miguel Abreu, Lanny Smith. Shawn 
Stafford. Greg Pitser, John Stanfill. (third 
row) Benjamin Brendle, Hugh Bailey. Jim 
Sowerby. Brian Flanagan. Brad Waddell. 
Charlie Bradley, Michael Washburn, Bill 
Bigger. 



Second Center West Belk 

(l-r) Stewart Edmunds, Kurt Henjes, Elmer 
Dyke, Sedge Gray, Craig Detweiler, Will 
Whitaker, Mike Mell, Keith Shaw. Sid 
Jones, Hank VanDeventer, Keith Evans. 
Jeff Haney, David Can, Greg Thompson, 
Hal Elliot, Steve Stine. Mark Steiner, David 
Short. 



Third East Belk 

(first row) Tim Johnston. Todd Wiebusch, 
Jim Reaves. Warren Gould. John Laughlin. 
Bill Perry, Rod Molinare, John Marks, 
(second row) Ross Holt. Lee McCarley, 
William White, Bo Toplak, Marshal 
Johnston. Rod Holman, Kirk Gavel, Dave 
Stosur. (third row) Barry Elledge, Bob 
Loper, Jim Brueggemann, Stuart King, 
John Cobb, Ed Henderson, Joseph 
McMullen, Tom Schilling. 



Julie Kern 
Meg Kimbirl 
Stuart King 
Jodie Kmnett 
Kirk Kirkpatnck 
Rocky Kmiecik 
Bryant Knox 



Paul Ladue 

impley 
Joe Langley 
Lisa Lano 
tii'abeth Laughlin 
John Laughlin 
Carolyn Leavitt 



Freshman 227 





John Leiner 
Yates Lennon 
Bob Letton 
Dan Lindsey 
Anne Lofquist 
Mike Lufkin 
Elizabeth Lusk 




Freshman year: you hate 
it now, you love it later 



At times, freshman year seemed as if it 
would never end. In retrospect, 
however, the year went quite quickly. 
Although members of Second West 
Belk (center right), listen to another 
tedious hall meeting, Kathy Gratto and 
Bob Hopkins (top right), actually enjoy 
a Fiji mixer. A wishing-to-remain- 
anonymous freshman (far right), stays 
dry while she weighs in after jogging, 
but Paige Dalton, Martha Yeide, Mary 
Grey Reddick and Anne Miano (above), 
prefer getting wet before stepping on 
the scales. Lorelei Keif and Susie Myers 
(top center), show that one of the best 
memories of freshman year is not the 
events, but the people. 




228 Freshmen 




Jett Af | 

•iughey 



Fear And Trembling 
In Mixerland 



The term mixer is misleading. Do 
not be fooled by the dictionary 
definition ("mixer: an electrical 
appliance for mixing or beating 
foods"); a mixer at Davidson is far 
more dangerous and insidious, and 
can take control of an entire class in 
ways no guileless Davidson freshman 
could possibly anticipate. 

First of all. a mixer is not an 
appliance at all. Keep this in mind. 
for the mixing and beating that goes 
on at a mixer rarely involves 
electrical appliances, though one 
might at times think other wise. 
Rather, a mixer is, according to the 
unfortunate slang definition that 
appears alongside the more 
traditional one, "a social gathering 



for getting people acquainted with 
one another." But somehow, that 
definition fails to capture the essence 
of Davidson's covert rite. Here things 
begin to get insidious. 

Consider now the targets of this 
ritual: freshmen. Does any group on 
campus more resemble a flock of 
innocent lambs, ripe for the pickin' 
and eager to please? They swarm to 
Davidson in early September, for the 
most part quite unaware of campus 
life but ready to learn all about it. 
The entire class makes a perfect 
target for any mind-altering guru who 
should happen by. 

The College knows this; 
furthermore, it exploits this baby 
sealishness completely in order to 



maintain the mixing tradition (again. 
mixer does not mean appliance). 
"Hall counselors" (in reality the 
mind-altering gurus) plant themselves 
on each freshman hall, endowed with 
cheerfulness, pep, jollity, and — a 
hey trait — friendliness Within a 
week, these "hall counselors" have 
gained the confidence of all the 
freshmen on their halls, who will now 
believe anything they say. 

Then the "counselors" move in for 
the kill. "Mixers are a great way to 
meet people, and they're fun, too!" 
begins the deceit. In no time at all, 
entire halls (now bonded by bizarre 
and often perverse hall names 
designed solely to make the group 
easier to handle) troop down to 
assorted Patterson Court houses to 
mix with halls of the opposite sex. 
All mixes learn the fabulous Five: 
"What's your name/home town/ 
course schedule/roomate/average 
SAT score?" and learn to forget 
promptly any answer they receive. 
Alcohol goes to any mixes who 
become suspicious of their true 
circumstances, and loud music plays 
so no one can communicate enough 
to plan an escape. 

The final injustice comes when the 
"hall counselors"suggest the Theme 
Mixer. So overwhelmed that they 
cannot protest even if they wanted 
to, the freshmen dress like hula girls, 
tacky tourists, pimps and prostitutes 
in order to complete the final stage 
of Davidson's indoctrination. 

So where are all the Davidson 
freshmen lambs with silly costumes? 
Happily, this trial by fire ends on an 
encouraging note. Freshmen do not 
remain freshmen forever. They turn 
into sophomores, wise fools who find 
forms of entertainment other than 
standing next to people they don't 
know and spouting the Fabulous 
Five. They shun the mind-altering 
gurus for other mind-altering 
activities, and by the end of their 
freshman year have made frienc 
outside the realm of the mixer ritual. 
An insidious ritual? Maybe, but it 
works, and it shows no signs of 
diminishing. ■ 



Freshmen 229 



John McGuirt 
Will McGuirt 
Dan McKeithen 
Ian McLean 
Joe McMullen 
Beth Maczka 
John Malone 



Paige Marsh 
Steve Marshall 
Mimi Mauze 
Mike Mauze 
Jerry May 
Ann Meador 
Mike Mell 



Geoge Meriwether 
Jerry Meyer 
Rod Molinare 
Alva Moore 
Hannah Moore 
Susan Moore 
Anne Morgan 



Third Center Belk 




(first row) David Boulware, Dave Resnick, 
Danny Waddill, Gordon Turnbull. (second 
row) Chien Yu, Bryant Knox, Bill Heard, 
Chris Humphreys, Tom Johnson, Tim 
Waples, David Turner, Mitch Mitchell, 
Gardner Roddey, Bob Mosca, Gene Hicks 
(third row) Jeff Hall, Gus Jamison, John 
Munson, Harold Vance, Yates Lennon, 
Tony Dick, Jim Weller, Chris Blake, Greg 
Rhodes, Bill Cardwell, Joe Bossong, Joe 
Park, Clay Napper. 



Second West Belk 

(not by tombstone) Jeff Carter, Tom 
Evans, Mark Gant, Ross Hunter, Ken 
Jaegers, John Leiner, Wilson Lowery, 
Preston Robertson, Bud Aiken, Rhett 
Brown, Hunt Greene, Ian McLean, Don 
Mat this, Todd Pierce, Ed Tavel, Charlie 
Tiches, Martin Valbuena, Mike Goode, 
John Mann, Harding Erwin, Rob Farley, 
Norman Gordon, Jim Kemper, Mike 
Lufkin, Alec MacBeth, Bill Warner, John 
Woodmansee, Dwayne Wright. 



230 Freshmen 




Grey • 

Susn 

Clay Napper 




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Susan Norman 
Mercedes Oglukian 
Tony Pack 
Melissa Page 
Ellen Papadeas 
Joe Park 
John Parker 



Sarah Patterson 
Siena Paul 
Can Plaut 
Dean Pold 
John Ponder 
Ken Pooley 
Anne Forges 




Third Richardson 

(first row) Raye Alford. Elizabeth Laughlin, 
Joanne Fleming, Kelly Sundberg, Allison 
Harper, Ann Hunter, Susan Norman, Laura 
Helmus, Claire Groves, Elizabeth Lusk. 
(second row) Lee White, Shirin Hanafi. 
Alva Moore, Sarah Speed, Lauren 
Hightower, Sheila Can, Pam Strader, 
Cherie Spencer, Nancy Rosselot. (third 
row) Ellen Papadeas. Julie Kern, Pam 
Steadman, Jill Vandenbos, Sarah Howell, 
Mike Frankhouser, Judy Redd. Mary 
Griffin, Ann Meadow, Elaine Stone. Diane 
Bynum. 



First West Belk 

(first row) Andy Harrison. Greg Murphy. 
Rich Horlbeck. Jim Crowe, Bill Harmon. 
Danny Sappenfield. Mark Swanson. 
(second row) Jim Walke- oyd Clark, 
(back row) Brian Sacht/en. Tony Huggins, 
Chuck Lampley, Carlton Clmkscales. John 
Ponder. 



Freshmen 231 




Forrest Ranson 

Keith Rawlins 

Jim Reaves 

Judy Redd 

Mary Grey Reddick 

Ivan Reich 

David Resnik •":! * 



Greg Rhodes 
Preston Robertson 
Sallie Robinson 
Shep Robinson 
Gardner Roddey 
Hunter Roddey 
Jim Rogers 



Nancy Rosselot 
Caroline Rumley 
Dan Ryan 
Todd Sachtjen 
Tim Schipke 
Mary Shaffer 
Jim Shaw 



232 Freshmen 




Chartes Short 
Can Shuknan 
Davd Snk 



Lanlord Smith 
Lauren Smith 



Sarah Speed 
Cherie Spencer 
Julie Slaufter 



Pam Steadman 
Roland Stebbms 
I Elaine Slone 



Janet Stovall 
Pam Slrader 
Joanne Stryker 



William Sullivan 
Kelly Sundberg 
Meg Surra II 
Mark Swanson 
Bill Swift 
John Syme 
Laura Taft 



Ed Tavel 
Julia Thayer 
David Thomas 
Lisa Thomas 
Charles Tiches 
John Toier 
Laura Tumburke 



S* Turlington 
Martin Valbuena 
Hank VanDebenter 
Mi Vandenbos 
Brad Waddell 
James Walker 
John Walsh 



Freshmen 233 



Tim Waples 
Morgan Ward 



miik 



Michael Washburn 
Will Weatherspoon 




Jean Webb 
Jim Weller 



Will Whitaker 
Elizabeth White 



Lee White 
William White 



Todd Wiebusch 
Mike Wilkinson 



Atondra Williams 
Laura Williams 



Elizabeth Wintermute 
Jim Wright 



234 Freshmen 




During Davidson's Town Day. college 
students involved themselves in a 
variety of ways. Y-Student Service 
Corps President Cathy Dumas (left). 
presents $300 to the Community 
Center for the construction of a 
backstop on its soft ball field. Although 
Pam Hawkins and Lisa Lawler (bottom 
left), look somewhat disgusted by 
what's happening on the stage, Beth 
Maczka (bottom right), enjoys the 
entertainment, which ranged from 
children's skits to Davidson College's 
"Beaufort Band. " Offstage. Clare 
Eckert and Charles Coffey (bottom 
center), fill tires with air and fix parts at 
the bike Co-op. 



Students put Interests 
to use at town day 




wu ' »» ' 



Freshmen 235 



Pig pick in' — a 
moveable feast 



The aroma of roasted pig became a 
familiar scent for Davidson students 
during the spring term. Following the 
old fraternity custom of an annual pig 
pickin' and avoiding the recently 
forbidden use of earthern pits on 
campus, the Commons sponsored its 
own feast by turning the pigs over 
portable pits. Burt Taylor (right), 
appears to ride one of the pigs. After 



the meat has been smoked, two men 
(bottom), begin the pickin' part of the 
roast. At their Fiji Island Weekend at 
Myrtle Beach, this fraternity roasted 
their pig in a pit that certainly was not 
dug on campus. Melissa Page and Bob 
Hopkins (below), enjoy appetizers in 
the backseat of their car while waiting 
for the pickin' of the Fiji pig. 




236 Sophomores 




EM]^ 11 




Juhe Abrams 
Jane Alexanian 
Philip Alter 
Doug Ammar 
Carl Anderson 
Shannon Anderson 
Mills Antley 



Tracy Askew 
Pete Astapchik 
Smdy Aycock 
Brooks Babcock 
Karen Baldwin 
Mandy Barber 
Richard Barber 



Virginia Barnhardt 
Mary Barringer 
Todd Beck 
Jeb Benedict 
Eileen Benner 
Betsy Blake 
Mike Blake 



Peggy Blount 
Lisa Boardman 
George Booth 
Caroline Boudreau 
Greg Bounds 
Kay Boyd 
Kathy Bray 



John Breidenstine 
Betsy Brice 
Rachel Brown 
Tony Broyles 
Bob Bruce 
Stephanie Bruck 
Leslie Bryan 



Sharon Bryant 
Pete Burr 
William Gallon 
Malcolm Campbell 
Clark Carter 
Elizabeth Coleman 
Lanny Conley 



Jerry Cook 
Bill Crone 
Katherine Cross 
Phillip Crowder 
Katie Dagenhai 
Willie David 
Emily Davis 



Alicia Dewey 
Steve Dick 

Dickey 
Pat Donley 
Will Donovan 
Lindsey Durway 
David Earnhardt 



Sophomores 237 



Heading for the wide 
open spaces 



The Davidson campus offers more than 
just a few quaint buildings, and the 
space which these buildings penetrate 
gives students room of their own. Tom 
Franz and Stephanie Bensinger (right), 
relax on a dock at Lake Norman while 
waiting their turn to waterski. After a 
game flickerball, Melissa Page (far 
bottom right), and some of her friends 
from the Second Rich team sprawl out 
on the field. To spend some time by 
himself, Chris Kimmel (far top right), 
plays his guitar on the lawn in front of 
Chambers. 



John Eglin 
Fred Ehrmon 
Charles Elyea 
Margaret Ervin 
Mary Fant 
Ellen Field 
Elizabeth Findlay 



Catherine Flnegan 
Eric Fink 

Elizabeth Flanders 
Sydney Foreman 
Sarah Galiley 
David Gaston 
Harriett Gaston 



Elizabeth Gerken 
Andrea Geyer 
Anne Goodwin 
John Graham 
Rick Graves 
Sue Graves 
June Greer 




238 Sophomores 







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!^ii^^^ 




Chris Gunn 
Alison Hall 
Courtney Hall 
David Hall 
Bill Hall 
Jane Harper 
Gripr Harris 



Philip Harry 
Beverly Hart 
Bill Hay 
Sam Hay 
Deborah Hayes 
John Hendrix 
Doug Henson 



Rene Hettong 

Todd Hermetz 
Karis Herrnslein 
Laura Hills 
Sue Hilton 
Minor Hinson 
Bob Hopkins 



Sophomores 239 



Kathleen Huff 
Sarah Hughes 
Aubrey Humphries 
Jessica Hunt 
David Hutchinson 
Bob lies 
Frank Ivey 



Lentz Ivey 
Dunbar Ivy 
Joe Jaworski 
Sue Jenney 
Clay Johnson 
Laura Johnson 
Carole Jolly 





Davidson athletics: 
meet the real world 



Although college athletes can offer 
some stimulating competition, it, like 
the rest of college life, sometimes 
provides only a partial view of the real 
world. The Davidson athletics on these 
two pages discovered something a little 
bigger, however, as they reached 
beyond that at-home advantage. Bill 
Wahl (bottom right), dribbles past a 
member of Carolina Lightning, 
Charlotte's professional soccer team, 
during a spring exhibition match. 
Moving away from the homefield, 
Danny Armistead, Jack Smith, Tom 



Kazee, Jeff Carter, and Sterling Martin 
(above), smile before they participate in 
the Charlotte Observer Marathon. Garry 
Sullivan (far right), practices for the 
prestigeous Boston Marathon, which he 
and some friends attended this spring. 
Demonstrating their canoeing 
technique, Ed Daugherty and George 
Strickland (top right), cut the water of 
Lake Norman with their paddles. 
George travelled the farthest of any of 
the Davidson athletes when he and his 
partner participated in the World 
Championship in Bula, Wales, and 
learned what life away from Davidson 
can be, "It was a humbling 
experience. " 



240 Sophomores 



Susan Kahn 
Elisabeth Kelly 
Ester Kim 
Todd Kimsey 
Becky King 
Steve King 
Stan Klinger 



Eleanor Knobloch 
Kalhy Kooken 
Terry Kurtis 
David Lee 
Dick Lee 
Mary Legerton 
Dwayne Lett 




Sophomores 241 





w 









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k\ 



The old vs new — 
that certain charm 



This fall the new dorms, Irwin and 
Knox, appeared as a clean alternative 
to the old regulars. Eric Fichtner (top 
right), enjoys his dustball free room in 
Knox while John Ferguson, Todd Beck, 
and Bob Finch (right), study in the 
sleek atmosphere of Irwin's lounge. 
Though the ceilings in Cannon might be 
falling in upon them, Boo Hogan and 
Elizabeth Coleman (above), take 
advantage of a lived-in dorm as they 
drink beers together on the balcony. 



David Lincoln 
Sherri Lind 
Janet Lindsley 
Charlie Lovetl 
Adelyn Lutz 
John Lyday 
Beth Mack 





242 Sophomores 




Stewart Mac William 
Jett Mann 
Roy Martin 



Jim Mashburn 
Leon Mason 
Liza Mason 



Coy Matthews 
David McCurry 
Tom McKean 



Melissa McManis 
Pete McMichael 
Jeff McSwam 



Cambria Melton 
Matt Merrell 
Dan Metzel 



Andrea Miller 
Ann Mitchell 
Stephanie Moffett 



Kelly Moore 
Jim Morgan 
Victoria Neale 



John Norman 
Mark Nottingham 
Jennifer Obnant 
Scott Otto 
Gina Overcash 
Frances Palmer 
Brad Perkins 



Sophomores 243 




Robert Pool 
Lynmarie Posey 
Lynn Powell 
Susan Prettyman 
Lindsey Rader 
Jason Ratterree 
Jane Redd 



244 Sophomores 



The return of 
the white stuff 



The snow began falling at night In 
Davidson, making even Chambers (top 
left), seem an enchanting sight. By that 
next January morning. Rip Singer and 
Sam Fullerton (top left), throw the first 
of many snowballs, while Todd 
Weibusch (below), runs to avoid being 
hit. Stokes Peebles. Hill Stockton, and 
Ricky Dominick (bottom left), rest 
against a tree after an exhausting time 
romping through President Spencer's 
front yard. Peeking from behind her 
shield, Linda Cruciani (left), risks 
becoming a target for homeless 
snowballs. 




Curlin Reed 
Jorgia Rice 
Catherine Rich 
Dick Richards 
Richard Riggs 
Carl Rist 
Charles Robinson 



Sophomores 245 



Gabriella Robinson 
Lynne Rogich 
Anne Rollins 
Alan Rosier 
Sara Ross 
James Rumley 
John Ruppenthal 



Bill Satterwhite 
Deepak Sawhney 
Gary Schenk 



Deborah schretter 
Ron Schumber 
Anderson Scolt 



Caroline Scragg 
Christine Seel 
William Shreve 



John Silver 
Juleigh Silton 
Stephen Skelton 

I 



David Sloan 
Greg Sloop 
Elizabeth Smiley 



Cheryl Soderstrom 
Robert Spach 



Robert Spaugh 
Jennifer Spencer 
Mark Stanback 




246 Sophomores 



George i. I 

Randy .' I 

Susan 

Dennis Sweavengin 

Mary Tabb 

Richard Tapp 

Donna Thompson 




Sophomores 247 



A toast to 
cares? 



Who 



From veteran seniors to freshman halls, 
alcohol is a staple of the college diet. 
Most students look to those little — 
OH's, in whatever form, for release 
from academic rigor mortis. Kathryn 
Carter (below), begins the round of 
freshman mixers at Fiji with an 
inevitable open bar. Once set in the 
right direction, the freshmen seem to 
have few problems fitting into the 
mainstream, apparent in Dan Lindsey, 
Stuart King and Will Whi taker's struggle 
(below). No party's complete without a 
few beers. Mike Murphy (right), 
partakes of the ever flowing nectar of 
Hattie's Night, while Beth Finnerty 
(bottom right), bops to the beat of the 
Skip Castro band and Andrea Geyer 
(far bottom right), basks in the glow of 
Blackhawk and Busch at Spring Frolics, 
Thanks to Bud, a good time was had 
by all. Wine, beer, liquor: it's there no 
matter where you look. Not even the 
hallowed walls of E.H. Little are spared, 
Jenny Cooper, Martha Nelson, Sarah 
Hall and Reaves Robinson (top right), 
show that everything, even homework, 
can be swallowed a little easier. 




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248 Sophomores 




Burt Taylor 
Jane Thompson 
Jetf Tilbury 



Mark Tully 
Dan Turk 
Brad Uline 



Lauren Van Metre 
Dan Voorhis 
Tom Walker 



Sloan Warner 
Becky Waters 
Kim Weiss 



Drew Wells 
Nelson Westerhout 
Lee Whitesides 



Charles Wiley 
Steve Wilkms 
Ben Williams 



Debra Williams 
Andy Wilson 
Bob Winston 



Chris Woods 
Pat Woodward 
Earl Wooten 



Sophomores 249 



Trig Adams 
Mike Allan 
Sherman Allen 
Geoff Andrews 
Melane Atwood 
Doug Austin 
Eddie Aziz 



Brenda Baker 
Brent Baker 
Al Baldwin 
Bob Barnes 
James Bar rat 
Paul Baynard 



Beth Ann Been 
William Berson 
Lindsay Biddle 
Carolyn Bolen 
David Boone 
James Borwin 
Wendy Boulware 



Elizabeth Brazell 
Cynthia Briscoe 
James Brown 
Linda Brown 
Bob Buchanan 
Karrie Buckner 
Laura Bush 



John Cain 
Scott Campbell 
Kathy Cantwell 
Mary Carpenter 
David Carr 
Marie Cefalo 
Laura Champlain 



Cindy Clark 
Frank Clark 
Brad Cors 
Jean Covell 
Todd Cowdery 
Ronnie Cox 
Amy Crittenberger 



Marni Crosby 
Chris Culp 
Laura Curry 
Drew Davis 
Richard Davis 
True Davis 
David Donahower 



Cathy Dumas 
Harry Easterling 
Lund Easterling 
Scott Eblin 
John Edwards 
Mark Elmore 
Eric Faires 




250 Juniors 




Realizing that the team is smashing 
their opponent. Hampden-Sydney, in 
the 198 1 Homecoming game. Davidson 
football player (top left), shouts for his 
onfield teammates. Roger Herbert 
(bottom left and right), cannot help but 
smile during the game that finally led to 
a 42- 14 point win. Cheerleader Lance 
Sisco (top right), shares in the overall 
thrill of victory. 



Juniors 251 



J.C. Faulkner 
Denise Ferguson 
Victor Ferrari 
Eric Fichlner 
Alan Fields 
David Fleming 
Joanna Fleming 



Mike Frankhooser 
Debbie Freeman 
Roy Fuller 
Christine Gauch 
Mary Ann Gelly 
Felix Gerdes 
Jonathan Glance 




The Varied ways 
of Davidson Fun 



Davidson's Thursday night at the 900 
room disco moves into another 
dimension as four disc jockeys and 
their alter egos play the punk. Randy 
Stroud, Randy Stroud (left), and Mandy 
Barber, Mandy Barber (right), survey 
the dancers from behind the cover of 
tinted lenses. While Andy Brown, Andy 
Brown (standing), leans over the other 
deejays, Anderson Scott, Anderson 
Scott (center), tries to suppress his 



uncontrollable secret desires with iron 
chains. Jim Troutman, Ken Lewis, and 
Kevin Attar (right), ignore the chains 
and head off for the beach at the Fiji 
Island weekend at Myrtle. Preparing for 
some fun, Martha Nelson (far right), 
grins and tugs at her overalls. In a 
more subdued activity, Vinita 
Pottsdamer (top right), models for the 
BSC fashion show. 



252 Juniors 



■de 

Ivy Gckj I 

Mim.i Qntana 
Gene Griggs 
Pole Gulyn 



Scott Height 
Tom Heller 
Shennon Hemilton 
Grey Hempton 
Derek Harbin 
i >.< Harlan 

Brad Harrold 




Juniors 253 







Florence Hart 
Langdon Hartsock 
Mark Harwick 
Charles Hasty 
Buncie Hay 
Jeff Heath 
Carol Heppner 



Lisa Herard 
Jeff Herrln 
Beth Herron 
John Higinbothom 
Marian Hill 
Ginger Holley 
Carol Hoopes 



James Hooten 
Caryn Hoskins 
Kenneth Hovet 
Linda Hulburt 
Chip Hurley 
Anne Hurt 
Suzanne Hutchings 



254 Juniors 




10:00 hour bites 
the dust 



Kiss a lit lie piece of tradition goo:: 
1982 saw several such farewells; in 
addition to the end of the senior 
candid, the hallowed 10:00 hour 
enjoyed its last year before the 
practicalities of scheduling dragged it 
into the computer to join the beloved 
eight and one. On thse two pages a 
tribute to the deceased Students (top 
left) writhe on the floor during a 10:00 
P. E. class in judo, the daily trek to the 
post office (far left), provides students 
a calm time to talk to friends. On every 
Thursday morning, students and 
professors meet for Coffee and Cokes 
in the Chambers' Gallery. Chip Hurley 
(bottom center), speaks with Laura 
Singleton during this event. Looking at 
John Krotchko's painting which hung in 
the Gallery during the spring student 
exhibit, Lisa Lawler and Pam Hawkins 
(bottom left), use the ten o'clock hour 
for enrichment. 




Stan Hynds 
Joseph Jernigan 
Tim Johnston 
Mike Jones 
Peter Jones 
Greg Kautmann 
John Kautmann 



Will Kendnck 
Anne Keith 
Mike Kelley 
Natalie Kerr 
Diane King 
Hope King 
Jeffrey Kistler 



Robert Klein 
Ken Kneg 

tchko 
Connie Kyle 
Lynn Lackey 
Warren Lackey 
Sherburne Laughlm 



Juniors 255 



Sieve Lawrence 
Jon Lawry 
Derek Lee 



Steve Lewis 
Chuck Li fiord 



Mike Lockwood 
Bret Logan 
Eric Long 



Bryan Lowe 
Paul Mainella 
Arabella Malone 



John Mann 
Lucy Marshall 
Mike Mason 



Kim McAlister 
John McCormick 
Kirsten McDonald 



John McDowell 
Greg McFayden 
John McJunkin 



Melissa Mckeithen 
Rusty McLelland 
Elizabeth McMillan 




256 Juniors 





Students ask, 
Going my way? 



The campus may be small, but that 
does not stop students from finding 
more than one way to make the 
rounds. Even though he is using a more 
traditional means of transportation, Dan 
Turk (bottom left), is prepared for 
whatever his bike might bring him to. 
Leslie Mills (top right), as a result of not 
preparing too well for a crash, resorts 
to Cushman travel services. Letting his 
head do the walking, Bill Appleton 
(left), gets a different view of the 
campus and makes it to where he is 
going as well. Mary Ann Gelly (above), 
directs her friend Jon Lawry (below 
above), while hoping that he wants to 
go to the same place she does. 






Juniors 257 



Leesa McPhail 
Ridgely Medlin 
Leslie Mills 
Sarah Moody 
Tom Moore 
Cathy Morell 
Brad Mullis 



Kathryn Murray 
Mark Murrey 
James Newsome 
Melisa Nicolaides 
Sarah Nock 
Johnathan Norwood 
John Odell 




tiMmM i 



1 



I 



Dogs move to greener 
pastures 



With the threat of the campus security 
to send all homeless dogs to the 
Humane Society, some of the 
abandoned animals were adopted by 
students and others shipped away from 
Davidson. Thomas Bates (above), 
shares a cigarette with Fred the dog, 
who left the insecurity of college for the 
stable home-life of Mark Murray. Anne 
Brennan watches as Lisa Brawley 
dances with Aragorn (right), before he 
moved to a farm in the country. 
Leaving the campus in a more violent 
manner, Pete (far right), enjoyed the 
strokes of his friend Jim Cheek until 
Pete died after being hit by a car. 



.'fiiors 




Ben Oi '■:• 

Patterson 
Rick Peek 
Deborah Sue Peters 
Kathy Petrea 



Karl Ptet/erkorn 
Susan Pottenger 
James Reese 
Pamela Rew 
Liz Ribadencyra 
John Robbins 
Joe Roberts 



Joyce Robinson 
Lisa Robinson 



Reaves Robinson 
Tripp Robinson 



Carol Roche 
Malcolm Rogers 



Tom Roth 
Caroline Rourk 



Brian Rowan 
Daniel Rowe 



Ellen Rowe 
Enc Sanner 



Juniors 259 



Rays, fall on willing 
students 



The idle days of summer came a 
season early, and many Davidson 
students, when given the proper 
weather conditions, opted for a 
afternoon in the sun over an 
afternoon in the library. Bryan Lowe 
(below), uses the tactic of pretending 
to study. Rather than staring at his 
towel, Dave Riopel (far top right), 
enjoys the view at Myrtle Beach. To 
prevent dehydration, Chris Culp, Tom 
McKean, Bill Cobb, and Elliott Stotler 
(bottom right), drink beer after an 
IMAC Softball game. Putting up no 
pretenses, Lucy Everett (top right), 
Rich Glaze (center), and Brian 
Collins (far bottom right), sacrifice 
themselves to the sun god. 





Danny Sappentield 
Cliff Savage 
Tom Schember 
Kim Scolt 
Mark Sheffield 
Steve Shield 
Mitzi Short 



260 Juniors 




©£J3£ 




Shy 
"ripson 
ipson 
ngleton 
Laura Singleton 
Joe Sloop 
Catherine Smith 



Juniors 261 



Ed Smith 
John Smith 
Norwood Smith 
Sandy Smith 
Shawn Stafford 
Barry Starnes 
Stratton Sterghos 




The games people 
play 



To get a break from the tedium of 
studying, students often turned their 
attentions to games that let them use 
their minds and/or bodies in different 
ways. Though a little strategy may be 
involved, Ultimate Frisbee (top), is more 
a game of body. Chris Tiernan (above), 
improves his eye-hand coordination as 
he tries to win at the Asteroids video 



game. Concentrating on the bestloved 
sport at PAX, Brian Collins (right), 
looks over his hand of cards while 
Sydney Foreman watches. Stewart 
Tabb (far right), product of the Bill 
Giduz School of Juggling, earns a P. £ 
credit. Showing what four hands can 
do, two students (above right), give a 
demonstration of double juggling with 
five balls. 




262 Juniors 




ikiU* 





Samur 
Johnny Ston« 

■ toudt 



Teress Strawser 
Victor Taylor 
Tracy Thompson 
Loy Thornton 



Chris Tiernan 
Beth Toler 
Nick Tsantes 
Dawn Tunks 



Gordon Turnbull 
Doug Vass 
Danny Waddill 
Leonard Walker 



Gary Walton 
Eric Weiss 
Margaret West 
Robert Whalen 



Ed Whitesides 
Stewart Wicker 
Crystal Williams 
Elizabeth Williams 



Kendnck Williams 
Dale Withrow 
Jeanne Womack 
Cliff Woodard 



Krista Wruck 
James Young 
Lisa Young 
Andrew Zoutewelle 



Juniors 263 



International students 
distinguished in all 
facets of Davidson 
life 



Students from all over the world 
attended Davidson College this year to 
experience a conservative American 
education. Early in the fall, foreign 
students (below), enjoy meeting their 
soon-to-be Davidson friends at a picnic 
As a member of the tennis team, John 
Hackett (right), concentrates on his 
forehand swing. With a similar intensity, 
Sofia Moreno (top center), helps 
Spanish students with drills and 
language speaking sessions. To earn 
money for expenses or traveling, A jay 
Sukhdial (bottom center), reshelves 
multitudes of returned library books 
after graduation, while Ant Goode (far 
right), reviews new tapes in the 
language lab. 




Didier Chenneveau 


Ant Goode 


John Hackett 


Susanne Kord 


Sofia Moreno 


Veromque Roynal 


Uineuil. France 


London. England 


Dublin. Ireland 


Marburg. West 
Germany 


Madrid. Spain 


Montpellier. France 



264 International Students 








Davidson: 
Smalltown 
U.S.A. 



A/ay Sukhdial 
Meerut. India 



Helen Thorpe 
Wothmg Sussex, 
England 



For most of the international 
students Davidson is our first contact 
with the U.S.A., and after a year it is 
still the main experience we have. 
The question that I have been 
asking, or that I have thought about 
asking all year long, is: "Is this 
typical of Davidson or of the United 
States in general." And although 
now I know how Davidson is different 
from all the other universities and the 
rest of the states, I sometimes still 
have the tendency to think that the 
Honor Code or the Code of 
Responsibility is a national institution. 

When you decide to spend a year 
abroad you obviously must prepare 
yourself to accept the cultural and 
social differences you are going to 
experience. I was ready to do so but 
I must admit that I had a really 
difficult time trying to understand 
how the Honor system could work. 
In France when you see your 
neighbor desperately failing his exam 
you try to give him a little help and 
know that you will get some in 
return, one day. Here people are just 



extremely reasonable and mature 
and do what is expected of them — 
work for themselves. 

Then I discovered the unknown 
world of fraternities, eating houses, 
campus parties, roommates, and the 
college Union. This I liked at once 
because I thought it brought a real 
social life to the college, and this 
place really needs one, as people 
spend most of their time studying. 
This is something we are really 
missing in France. 

I was also very surprised by the 
place that beer held in the students 
life. Now all this had become part of 
my own campus life: thus I can 
make the difference between a 
preppy and a redneck, I know that 
Yankees come from the North, and 
"ya'll" is part of my everyday 
vocabulary. From the academic point 
of view I also enjoyed the year, 
having the pleasure to listen to 
interesting Davidson teachers. I have 
learned another way of studying, at 
least more regularly: in my country, 
for example, we rarely have tests so 
most of the time when the final 
exams come we are unprepared and 
very surprised. 

As a conclusion, if I were born 
American Davidson would have been 
a perfect place to study. As an 
international student I enjoyed 
academic aspect of the cc 
going to feel a little 
next year, I'm sure 
pledged Veronique ■ 



International Students 265 




RUSK SCHOLARS: (first row) Alexandra Ehrmann. Emma Howard. Hester Abrams. Tracy Corrigan. 
(second row) Alessandro Vitelli. Adam Duncan. David Osborne. 



266 International Students 




>flL 




V 



- 




Let's Go — JYA 
America! 



Although much of what international 
students find in America is not new. 
video games are. Tracy Corrigan (far 
top left), tries Wizard of War for the 
first time, while Alessandro Vitelli (top 
center), brings original costuming to a 
900 Room disco. At midnight, 
Veronique Raynal and Sofia Moreno 
(above), witness the exciting change-of- 
schedule on the Union bulletin board. 
Veronique and friend Chris Tiernan 
(bottom center) walk to the Union on 
one of the warmer spring days. 
(Clockwise from center this page) 
Susanne Kord and Helen Thorpe enjoy 
the outdoors, as Didier Chenneveau 
studies economics amidst the gloom of 
a Chambers classroom. 



International Students 267 




Claire Abernalhy 
Vanessa Adams 
David Aldridge 
Lex Alexander 
Craig Allen 
Newton Allen 



Kelvin Anderson 
Danny Armislead 
David Banks 
Bill Bargmann 
Dan Barker 
Mark Barrett 



Patty Bates 
Thomas Bates 
Wes Bean 
Van Beck 
Warren Beck 
Eddie Beeker 



Kathy Bell 
Bill Bennett 
Thomas Biggs 
Janet Ward Black 
Susie Bledsoe 
Lori Boardman 



Dana Bolton 
Linda Boone 
Barbara Boyce 
Lisa Brawley 
Sharon Bridwell 
Andy Brown 



Jamie Brown 
Kathryn Brown 
Lanier Brown 
Howard Browne 
Lisa Buckley 
Tucker Burks 



268 Seniors 




Seniors 269 



Greg Burnard 
Cary Campbell 
Sally Campbell 
Tom Cartee 
Steve Carter 



Bill Chater 
Cindy Chavez 
Jim Cheek 
Julie Cheney 
Chip Christian 




John Chung 
Tom Clark 
Charles Coffey 
Edward Colechia 
Bryan Collins 



What kind of man reads 

the Davidsonian? 



The annual end-of-the-year student 
satire attacked the Davidsonian's 
reporting techniques. The satire's title, 
"What Kind of Man Reads the 
Davidsonian" came from the sexist 
advertisement which depicted Alumni 



Director Zachary Long and student 
Janet Ward Black (far right), checking 
the inscription on the bottom of an 
African vase. The show proved to be 
an equal farce of the advertisement. 
Howard Browne (above left), interviews 
pseudo-Ruskie Melissa McKeithen as 
she advocates the sophisticated social 



life of playing tennis, drinking beer and 
dating future businessmen. Marvin 
Overby (above right), imitating Physical 
Plant Director Grover Meetze, presents 
his plans to annex Cornelius to 
Davidson. Although tongue-in-cheek, 
this show pointed out many truths 
about Davidson. 



270 Seniors 




Mike Cooper 
Cordelia Crampton 

. ibeth Cranlord 
Rebecca Cross 
Linda Cruciani 



Janice Dallon 



Sandra Davis 



John Dent 
Micky Dillon 
Sally Dodd 
Ricky Dommick 
Stuart Dorset! 




Seniors 271 



Davidson dating — fact 
or fiction? 



Dating at Davidson really occurs, 
sometimes even on a regular basis. 
Davidson graduate Scott Wall and 
freshman Elizabeth White (right), get 
ready to go to a Christmas party. In a 
more casual atmosphere, Jon Glance 
and Cindy Stroud (bottom right), listen 
to local talent during Davidson's Town 
Day. Dennard Lindsey and John 
league (bottom left), joke around on 
the first floor of the library. Shannon 
Walters and Greg McFayden (below), 
strike this natural pose for another 
yearbook candid shot. 






-*9r«* 



V?*' 7 * 



272 Seniors 



»^-*' 







Charles Douglas 
Knox Douglas 
Diane Downing 
Alec Dnskill 
Brian Duke 
Debbie Eisenbise 



Phoebe Forio 
Sam Fullerton 
Rick Gaines 
Rick Gergoudis 
Mark Gillespy 
Tandy Gilliland 



Seniors 273 




Rob Gillison 


Jerry Greiner 


Rich Glaze 


Allen Griffin 


Ed Goode 


Stephanie Guenther 


Philip Goodnow 


Ellen Gyauch 


Bob Gould 


Betsy Haas 


Steve Gray 


Warner Hall 


21 A Seniors 






Heavy depression: 
seniors' 25th 
reunion in 2007 



May 23. 1982, the long-awaited day of 
graduation, brought out a variety of 
thoughts and emotions. Class President 
Andy Brown (below), convinces the Class 
of '82 that they will someday appreciate 
Davidson. Chip Christian (top left), and 
Diane Downing (bottom left), look damn 
proud of themselves during their last 
moments as college students. While 
Christian, Tom Clark, Eric Crum and Micky 
Dillon (center left) can hardly conceal their 
joy, Barbara Boyce and Mary Elizabeth 
Cranford (left), along with Knox Douglass 
(bottom center), express their sadness at 
leaving not only their friends but also the 
relatively carefree atmosphere of college. 




Seniors 275 




Jeff Hamilton 
Mark Hammond 
Lisa Harbottle 



Dan Harkins 
Eddie Harrison 
John Hartman 



Randy Harwell 
Jim Hawk 
Victor Hawk 



Pam Hawkins 
Jerome Hay 
Michael Healy 



Keith Hearle 
Cindy Hendricks 
Brent Hilleary 



Cathy Hodges 
Margaret Holt 
Betsy Holton 



276 Seniors 




Renegade bricks 
take over campus 



It all started quite innocently. Grover 
Meetze. head of Facilities 
Planning /Landscaping, bought some 
bricks to build a walkway around the 
Commons (far left) But. Grover could 
not stop buying bricks Every time he 
went shopping, he ended up at 
construction sites. Soon, over 277, 000 
red-clay bricks had taken over the 
campus. (Left to right from center) 
Brad Simpson laughlingly stacks up a 
couple rows of bricks before heading to 
class. Upon returning, Brad discovered 
that 33 guerilla bricks had joined their 
comrades to successfully block the 
entrance to his room. By late afternoon 
the bricks still refused to leave. At 
sunset, Meetze sent over the Bricks 
Tactic Squad who, after a violent 
struggle, subdued the rebellious bricks. 




Barbara Hoopes 
Chip Hoover 
Karen Hopper 



Angie Home 
John Hughes 
Kim Hulett 



Joanna Hunt 
Peter Hux 
Donna lies 



Carol Impara 
Mike lordanou 
Dean Jones 



James Jones 
Renee Jones 
Mike Kehs 



, Keiley 
3 Kelly 
Knox Kerr 



Seniors 277 




Emmy Knobloch 
Greg Kucera 
Laura Lacy 
Ralph Lasley 
Lisa Lawler 
Jonnie Leazer 


Chip Legerton 
Dennard Lindsey 
Patty Long 
Tim Lorenzen 
Becky Love 
Joanne Macconnachie 


Barry Mack 
Carolyn Mangelsdorf 
Curtis Markham 
Tom Marshburn 
Tom Martin 
Alex McCallie 


278 Seniors 









// had to rain 



At times rain seems to have a 
monopoly on Davidson College. It 
rained during freshman orientation, 
spring break and exams (top left). This 
year's Baccalaureate also was the 
scene for one of Davidson's wonderful 
spring deluges. While many parents 
storm DCPC in order to find a dry seat 
(center left), someone 's special parents 
sit close together, oblivious to the 
precipitation (bottom left). Likewise. 
Lisa Harbottle, Barbara Kelley and Stan 
Hynds (left), gather under an umbrella 
after the service. As parents huddle on 
the steps of the Church, Stan Hynds 
(above), slips between the columns to 
watch the rain fall. 



Seniors 279 



Lynn McClintock 
Heather McCormack 
Motl McDonald 
James McLain 
Suzy Moore 




280 Seniors 




I 
DMMt M '. . i 
Bert Mobhy 
Hal Mohorn 
Ginny Morrow 



Mudball or 

mudwrestling? 



Good old fraternity rivalry came to life 
during Davidson's Greek Week. Todd 
Lambert and Sam Fullerton (bottom 
center), soak the clay of Patterson 
Court in preparation for one of the Fijis' 
favorite intercollegiate sports, mudball. 
Fiji Eric Long (top left), and SAE Minor 
Hanson (bottom left), anticipate the 
other team's return. Fiji Mike lordanou 
(left), takes a break from the game, 
moments after Pika Chuck Price 
(above), aces the serve. After the game 
the Pikas line up for a Tide commercial 
photograph (top center). 



Seniors 281 




7 »- H' 




Sandra Ording Edith Parker 

Warren Overbey Ann Parker 




Gia Partain 
Wayne Paymer 



Melissa Peacock 
Stokes Peebles 




Sarah Mumy 


C.K. Nichols 


Kathy Munger 


Mike Noble 


Alice Musick 


Jim Northrup 


John Muskoff 


Chris Norwood 


Frank Myers 


Carie Nunn 


Albert Nester 


Diane Odom 


282 Seniors 





What a difference a 
year makes or two 
or three 



A couple of years can make a world 
of difference in how a person 
perceives graduation. Chip Legerton 
places his cap on his father's head 
(above), as both father and son 
receive Davidson diplomas. Dr. 
Legerton attended Davidson for three 
years during World War II. After 
serving in the war, he returned to 
complete medical school without 
ever formally graduating from 
Davidson. Almost forty years later 




Lucy Phillips Jayne Ransom 

Bill Purcell Chris Reasoner 



Joan Redding John Rees Molly Rice Susan Roberts 

Stan Reed Craig Rice Wendy Rider Hugh Roberlson 




Seniors 283 



From folk to rock 
students play it all 



Although Davidson's Music Department 
is somewhat limited, students still 
participate in a wide range of musical 
forms. John Hart man, Sue Graves, 
Frazier Worth and Greg Kucera 
(above), the Beaufort Band, here 
perform at Emanon's Bluegrass 
Afternoon. In a more aggressive 
manner, Ice 9's Joe Jaworski (right), 
and Pika's Ron Emerson (top right), 
drum out a steady beat. Enjoying 
keyboard instruments, Paul Ward (far 
right), plays his graduation present, a 
calliope, and joins with John Hoots and 
Bill Heard (lower right), in a jazz 
ensemble performance on the 
Commons lawn. 




284 Seniors 




Seniors 285 




Tony Smith 
Dwight Smith 
Scott Smith 



Parks Snead 
Wilson So/ley 
Jean Soracco 



Eric Sorensen 
John Spangler 
Geoff Spencer 



Lee Ann Stackhouse Elliott Stotler Perry Swindall 

Agnes Stevens Richard Strader Todd Swoflord 

Hill Stockton Cindy Stroud Ralph Taylor 



Climbing the corporate 
ladder 



IrKU. 



Not only do graduating seniors contend 
with a high unemployment rate, but 
they also face a society which expects 
them to become successful. Jonathan 
West and Randy Harwell (right), 
recreate an all-too-familiar situation 
seen repeatedly in Mecklenburg County. 
With a more lucrative profession in 
mind, Dennard Lindsey (far right), plans 
to attend law school. Unfortunately, 
even lawyers are finding jobs hard to 
secure. 



286 Seniors 





Katie Tully 
Anne Turk 
Georgeann Vagt 
Susan von Herrmann 
Terry Wade 
Bruce Wallace 


Shannon Walters 
Whit Wampler 
Paul Ward 
Jay Warrick 
Bryna Watson 
Ricky Watson 


George Webster 

■ ebster 
David Weitnauer 
Karen Welty 
Bruce West 
Jonathan West 

Seniors 287 




s. 




w 






Does Davidson make 
the grade? 



No one can agrue that the quality of 
education at Davidson is high. Even 
though the large amount of time spent 
studying seems ridiculous to Liz 
Ribadeneyra (top right), Laura Williams 
(top center), keeps on looking for term 
paper sources. The quality of social life, 
however, presents a more debatable 
question. The Skip Castro Band 
(above), sponsored by Rusk and 
Warner Hall, made a lasting impression 
as one of the year's best events. For 
the freshmen, including Melissa Page 
(right), the Commons roasted a pig one 
Saturday afternoon. Though house 
functions tend to be less exciting than 
pig pickings, Cindy Hendricks and Keith 
Hearle (bottom right), manage an 
unusual conversation during an Emanon 
party. 




288 Seniors 




Tim Whalen 
Craig While 
Liza While 
Linos Whit lock 
PJ Whitlock 
Brian Whilmire 



Seniors 289 




290 Graduation 




The Last 
Big Weekend 

(Confessions Of A Senior) 

The Davidson Experience — for 305 of us it's over, four years 
worth. The first three years and two terms we spent desperately 
wishing we were elsewhere; the last two months we made a last ditch 
attempt at profound conversation with dozens of people we will likely 
never see again. And then we graduated, with all the pomp and 
ceremony Davidson has to offer. It seemed somehow anticlimatic. Oh, 
it was nice, but I slept through most of baccalaureate. As I recall it 
was hot, and my hat wouldn't stay on, and the speaker, Warner Hall, 
was fairly witty but didn't say much of lasting value. Oh, and it rained, 
and Mom and Dad had to cram into the back of DCPC. But the best 
part was when everybody tried to exit without getting shoved out into 
the rain. And then the "supper at dusk" in Chambers. The Davidson 
rain — somehow that was appropriate. The sky clouded over again 
Sunday morning, and I swore I wasn't going to graduate in Johnston 
Gym. That would have been a blow to the dignity of the times even I 
could not tolerate. But Mom and Dad lucked out — the sun came out 
and I showed up. I don't think anybody ever did line up quite right; a 
couple of the cum laudes had to do a little shuffling once they hit their 
seats. Things were pretty smoothly, though, after Price figured out who 
got honors. We marched across the stage one by one while our 




Smiles, tears, looks of boredom 
and of wisdom can all be seen 
at graduation weekend. 
(Counterclockwise from bottom 
center). Students and family 
enjoy the post-baccalaureate 
dinner held in Chambers due to 
heavy rains. Dean Burts doesn't 
seem to enjoy the prospect of 
giving out 305 diplomas, though 
Mrs. Northcott watches with a 
smile. Greg Kuchera receives a 
smile along with his diploma from 
President Spencer as Dean 
Zimmerman prepares to reload. 
Tears and smiles can both be 
seen on the faces of Barbara 
Boyce and Mary Elizabeth 
Cranford. Dr. Kaylor searched for 
ships on the horizon as Albert 
Nester calmly accepts 
congratulations on his perm and 
his diploma. 



Graduation 291 




292 Graduation 



(Counterclockwise from lower 
right). Reverend Raynal gives a 
prayer of thanks at the 
baccalaureate. At graduation 
Dean Zimmerman prays that he 
can remember who won First 
Honor. From the tears of Patti 
Long's face to the look of joy 
and satisfaction shown by Lee 
Ann Stack, graduation day 
caused strong feelings. In a 
lighter moment Genevra Kelly 
adjusts her cap. A comparative 
veteran, Dr. Lewis remains clam 
at her second Davidson 
graduation. 




friends cheered, and never mind that Dad took a mil m \h 

an empty camera. It was a good feeling. Sam smiled i 

back for the next diploma while Market South of M 

captured the moment on film for a mere $7.95. A good time was had 

by all. 

It was an anticlimax all right. Even the class gift seemed pretty 
wimpy: a class fund, to be presented to the school at our 25th reunion 
(that's 2007). I'll put it on my calendar. I suppose Andy Brown had a 
point though. His speech, which was better received even than Warner 
Hall's, went something like this: "Right now, many of us are anxious to 
leave Davidson and have somewhat ambivalent feelings toward the 
school But. as time passes, I am fairly certain that we will come to 

view Davidson in more favorable terms. As we look back, we will come 
to realize that despite all of the seemingly enormous problems and 
serious disagreements that we may or may not have had with 
Davidson, life here was really not so bad. In fact we may come to 
realize that our college life here at Davidson was perhaps the happiest, 
most stimulating and fulfilling time of our lives." Well, I don't know if 
I'd go quite as far as Andy. Personally, I hope I haven't already lived 
through the happiest and most stimulating period in my thus far brief 
existence. But I'm sure that in a few years I'll be able to appreciate a 
little better all that Davidson had to offer. I'll pull out my yearbook and 
wax nostalgic; the ceremony will grow in grandeur; and I'll pull out my 
checkbook and drop a few the way of that old class gift fund. How 
can I tell? Because all this sarcasm takes effort. Look at me — it's 
June 7 and I'm still doing this, and I don't even go to school there any 
more. I guess it's all just part of that Davidson Experience, though 
God knows you couldn't read about it in the freshman handbook. But 
maybe that's just as well.B 




Graduation 293 



STUART SCHOLARS 

Brian Charles Brost '84 
James Earl Crowe, Jr. '83 
Sarah Kathryn Dagenhart '84 
John Wesley Eley. Jr. '83 
Roy Calhoun Fuller '83 
Richard Lewis Gergoudis '82 
Elizabeth Esther Kiss '83 
Moffat Grier McDonald '82 
Hunter Kelly Monroe '84 
Gregory Francis Murphey '85 
John Gardiner Roddey '85 
Parks Holman Snead, III '82 
Kelly Kay Sundberg '85 
Mary Weedon Tabb '84 
Craig Justice White '82 



GOODWIN-EXXON ALUMNI ASSOCIATION FRESHMAN MILITARY SCIENCE OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 



Leslie Mills 
Stokes Peebles 
Earl Wooten 



AWARD 

Eric Fink 
Lynmarie Posey 
Mahmoud Sayani 



Harry Easterling 
John Shaw 
George Thompson 



WHO'S WHO AMONG AMERICAN 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Janet Ward Black 
Andrew Melton Brown 
Donald Steven Carter 
Claiborne Ashby Christian 
Richard Eric Crum 
Stuart Battle Dorsett 
Robert Crawford Ervin 
Cindy Lou Faulkenberry 
Edward Seddon Goode 
James Markham Hall 
Lisa Marie Harbottle 
Keith Warren Hearle 
Margaret Berrena Holt 
Donna Jean lies 




Barbara Elizabeth Kelley 
Emmy Jean Knobloch 
Clarence William Legerton, I 
William Alexander McCallie 
Diane Kay Odom 
Marie Ann Parker 
Ray Stokes Peebles, Jr. 
William Robert Purcell, II 
Joan Lucille Redding 
John Carl Siman 
Ray Charles Sinclair 
John Given Spangler 
Elizabeth Jane Thomas 
Jeffrey James Wall 



During Spring Convocation, Pro- 
fessors Ratliff and Bernard (center 
right), wait patiently for the seniors 
to enter Love Auditorium. Recog- 
nized for her unselfish service to 
church, community and school, 
Lisa Harbottle (left) walks to the 
graduation stage to receive the Al- 
gernon Sydney Sullivan Award. 
Rich Gergoudis (far right), also 
steps up to the stage to accept the 
First Honor, an award given to the 
senior with the highest grade aver- 
age. After the commencement ex- 
ercises, Professor Melinda Lesher 
and Lori Boardman (below), look 
over the Davidson campus for the 
last time. 



Claiborne Ashby Christian 
Michael Edward Cooper 
Todd Shawl Cowdery 
Richard Eric Crum 
Stuart Battle Dorsett 
Robert Crawford Ervin 
Richard Kenneth Gaines 
Beth Ellen Gyauch 
Sarah Burney Hay 
Keith Warren Hearle 
Margaret Berrena Holt 
Donna Jean lies 
Elizabeth Esther Kiss 
Kenneth Joseph Krieg 
Sara Sherburne Laughlin 
Clarence William Legerton 
Warren M. Overbey 
Marie Ann Parker 
Ray Stokes Peebles, Jr. 
William R. Purcell, II 
John Carl Siman 
John Given Spangler 
David Allen Stosur 
Elizabeth Jane Thomas 
Nevins W. Todd, III 
Clifford Boehe Tribus 
James Leslie Troutman 
Gordon A. Turnbull 
Dan Wilson Waddill 
Shannon Lee Walters 
Edward W. Whitesides 




294 Awards 



PHI BETA KAPPA 

Newlon Perkins Allen. Jr 
William John Bargamann. Ill 
Warren Fmdlay Beck 
Lori Ann Boardman 
James Whiteney Cheek 
Julieanne Christine Cheney 
Mary Elizabeth Crantord 
Stuart Battle Dorset! 
Robert Crawlord Ervin 
David Evans 
Phoebe Ellis Forio 
Richard Lewis Gergoudis 
Jerome Coiiett Hay 
William David Hoover. Jr 
Karen Frances Hopper 
Donna Jean lies 
Carol Susan Impara 
Michael David Kehs 
Ralph Augustus Lasley 
Motlatt Gner McDonald 
Virginia Gayle Morrow 
Alice Ann Mustek 
Brain Wayne Nash 
Albert Dwayne Nester 
Christopher Royce Norwood 
Ga Michele Parlam 
Melissa Stratton Peacock 
Donya Jayne Ransom 
Earl Stacy Ransom. Jr 
Richard Haynes Strader 
Carl Wilson Sotley. Jr. 
Kevin Eric Sorensen 
John Given Spangler 
Frank Ramsay Thies. Ill 
Elizabeth Jane Thomas 
Nancy Whitlow Wampler 
Bryna Alwyn Watson 
Karen Elizabeth Welty 
Cnag Justice White 
Elizabeth Crosby White 




DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS 

Sandy Black Memorial Award Eric Andrew Weiss 

David Halbert Howard. Jr Chemistry Award Edgar Wall Harlan 

The Presser Award Cynthia Anne Clark 
A K Phiter Award Lucy Lunn Marshall and Edward W Whiteside* 

Jetlerson David Award Neil Charles Cooksey 

Bremer German Language Award David Matthew Rowe 

Thomas D Sparrow Award James Markham Hall 

Susan Roberts Award Sarah Ellen Todd 

James Baker Woods. Ill Memorial Award Harry R Easterling 

George C Marshall ROTC Award John M Shaw 

Daniel Blam Woods Award Debra Elaine Freeman 

Richard Ross Music Award Joan Lucile Redding 

William G McGavock Mathematics Award Mark Bryan Phillips 

GENERAL AWARDS 

Tommy Peters Award Ra y Charles Sinclair 

Rebecca E Stimson Award Emmy Jean Knobloch 

George L Gladstone Award Gordon A Turnbull 

Charles Malone Richards Award William Patrick Seel 

Agnes Sentelle Brown Award Kenneth Joseph Kneg 

R Wmdley II Memorial Award Thurston R. Hatcher 

(First Prize) 
Harding Erwm. Ross 
Holt (Second Prize) 
Jeffrey David Carter 
(Honorable Mention) 

Vereen Bell Memorial Award Victor Holland Hawk 

(First) 

David Malone Aldridge 

(Second) 

Kan Kirsten McDonald 

(Third) 



NORTH CAROLINA FELLOWS 

Peter Lyndon Beard 
John Jay Chung 
Michael Edward Cooper 
William Patrick Donley 
Scott Stewan Ebhn 
Anne Rebecca Elliott 
Robert Crawlord Ervin 
Daniel Ettedgui 
Mary Pacoiette Fant 
Samuel C Fullerton. IV 
Richard Lewis Gergoudis 
James Rene Hertong 
Donna Jean lies 
Carole Lynn Jolly 
Elizabeth H McMillan 
Leroy Marvin Overby 
Karl J Pteflerkorn 
Stephen Wilton Reardon 
John Robinson Singleton 
David Allen Stosur 
Ellis Allan Tmsley. Jr 
James Leslie Troutman 
Craig Justice White 
Edward W Whitesides 




Awards 295 



Index 



ABBERGER, WILLIAM WEST 
132, 184 

819 Sevelle Place 

Orlando. FL 32804 
ABBOTT, ANTHONY S. 40 
ABERNATHY, CLAIRE DUDLEY 

2, 1 1 1 , 268 

30 Willway Ave. 

Richmond, VA 23226 
ABRAMS, JULIE MARIE 123, 

237 

1900 NW 21st St. 

Gainesville, FL 32605 
ABRAMS, HESTER 266 
ABREU, M. GABRIEL-BERNON 

227 

21 Rue Casimir-Perie 

Paris, France 75007 
ADAMS. CRAIG STEWART 150 

1012 Marilyn Drive 

Raleigh, NC 27607 
ADAMS, JESSE EARL 132, 160, 

250 

224 N. Crest Road 

Chattanooga, TN 37404 
ADAMS, MARK THOMAS 132, 

167, 210, 237 

57 Mt. Lucas Road 

Princeton, NJ 08540 
ADAMS. VANESSA YVETTE 77. 

268 

1445 Harbin Road 

Atlanta, GA 30311 
AIKEN, ALBERT FARMER JR. 

219, 230 

605 North Hobcaw Drive 

Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 
ALDRIDGE. DAVID MALONE 

268. 295 

Maddox P.O. Box 185 

Monticello. GA 31064 
ALEXANDER. HOOPER IV 138, 

268 

6213 Carriagehouse Ln. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
ALEXANIAN, JANE 114, 232, 

237 

4083 Breakwood Drive 

Houston, TX 77025 
ALFORD, RAYE LYNN 182, 220, 

231 

1 14 Warrenton 
Houston, TX 77024 

ALLAN, MICHAEL ANSLEY 39, 

95, 128, 250 

2788 Ridge Valley Rd. NW 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
ALLEN, CRAIG FRENCH 132. 

268 

883 Indian River Dr. 

Coca. FL 32922 
ALLEN. NEWTON PERKINS JR. 

268 

950 Audubon Dr. 

Memphis. TN 38117 
ALLEN. SHERMAN CLIFTON 77 

141. 250 

4850 Rimbey 

Fort Worth, TX 76119 
ALLIBONE. WILLIAM PAUL 237 

307 Wykagyl Drive 

Hi-Nella. NJ 08083 
ALPHA PHI OMEGA 82, 83 
ALTER, PHILIP CHARLES 237 

5225 Piping Rock Ln. 

Houston. TX 77056 
ALVES. MELISSA ANNE 

1 15 Rhyne Ave. 
Winston Salem, NC 27107 

AMES. MORTIMER P 

Fifth and Elkdale 

Selma, AL 36701 
AMMAR, DOUGLAS BRIAN 80. 



85, 103, 123. 124. 206, 237 
1458 Frame Street 
Charleston, WV 25312 
ANDERSON, CARL HUGO 79, 
124, 237 

9775 Huntcliff Trace 

Atlanta, GA 30338 
ANDERSON, KATHLEEN E. 114, 

220, 221 

601 Hempstead PI. 

Charlotte. NC 28027 
ANDERSON, SHANNON JOYCE 

91, 126, 139, 237 
1 Stonybrook Drive 

Greenville. SC 29615 
ANDERSON, WADE GUNNAR 

4 Smith Lane 

Old Mystic, CT 06372 
ANDERSON, KELVIN W. 125, 

268 

669 Hempstead PI. 

Charlotte. NC 28027 
ANDREWS. ERNEST C. 117, 

231 

3224 Gleen Rd 

Durham, NC 27704 
ANDREWS. GEOFFREY 

DONALD 99, 206, 250 

P.O. Box N44 

Nassau. Bahamas -0150 
ANDROCLES AND THE LION 

158. 159 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 44 
ANTLEY. RAY MILLS JR. 128. 

237 

4646 Graceland Ave. 

Indianapolis, IN 46208 
APPLETON, WILLIAM C. 257 

1025 West Outer Dr. 

Oak Ridge. TN 37830 
ARDAMAN. MILES FERDI 220, 

226 

Rt. 1 Box 188 

Winter Garden, FL 32787 
ARDUINI, VINCENT S. 202 
ARMISTEAD. DANNY 117. 172, 

193. 240, 268 

Route 17 Box 252 

Johnston City, TN 37601 
ART HISTORY IN FRANCE 36, 

37 
ARTISTS SERIES 154, 155 
ASHWORTH, AMY SHERIDEN 

15, 134. 237 

604 Somerset Avenue 

Richmond, VA 32226 
ASKEW, TRACY JEAN 162, 237 

2325 Hallmark Dr. 

Pensacola, FL 32503 
ASTAPCHIK. PETER M. 237 

204 S. Jefferson St. 

Beverly Hills, FL 32665 
ATO 116. 117 
ATTAR. KEVIN GEORGE 123, 

124, 125, 175, 252 

35 Thomas Dr. 

Chelmsford, MA 01824 
ATWOOD, ROXANA MEBANE 

37, 174. 250 

7510 June Street 

Springfield, VA 22150 
AULT, RUTH L. 41 
AUSTIN, JAMES DOUGLAS 118 

138, 180 

4131 Dickey Road 

Gibsonia. PA 15044 
AWARDS. 294. 295 
AYCOCK. MISSINDY ANN 134. 

237 

1001 Cheviot Lane 

Gastonia. NC 28052 
AZIZ. EDDIE ADHAM 117, 250 

3512 Nassau Drive 

Augusta, GA 30909 



B 

BABCOCK, BROOKS ROBERT 
137, 184, 237 
10326 Meadow Lane 
Leawood, KS 66206 
BAILEY, ATMIRE JR 131 
175 Moody Street 
Lowell, MA 01854 
BAILEY, HUGH MARCELLUS 
177. 227 

6142 Page Court 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
BAKER, BRENDA JEAN 123, 

250 

7 S. Crossway 

Old Greenwich. CT 06870 
BAKER. DOUGLAS BRENT 131, 
177. 250 

4300 Summerville Rd. 

Phenix City, AL 36867 
BAKER, JAMES 202 
BALCOM. NIDA RIVES 

2680 Endor Road 

Pensacola, FL 32503 
BALDWIN, ALBERT LESLIE 137, 

167, 250 

3163 Boxwood Drive 

Atlanta. GA 30345 
BALDWIN. KAREN RUTH 117, 

159, 237 

3007 S. Fairway Dr. 

Burlington. NC 26215 
BALLARD. BARBARA R. 60 
BANKHEAD, WILLIAM MARTIN 

117, 182 

1931 Hawthorne Rd. 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
BANKS. DAVID COTTON 268 

2801 Rothgeb Dr. 

Raleigh, NC 27609 
BANKS. GARRY G. 220, 226 

1335 SE 11th Ave. 

Gainesville, FL 32601 
BARBAR. DAVID ROBERT 

640 Second St. 

Gulfport, MS 39501 
BARBER, MARY AMANDA 2, 

17, 237, 252 

1910 NW 23 Terrace 

Gainesville. FL 32605 
BARBER, RICHARD PAUL 117, 

237 

805 Fieldstone Rd. 

Mooresville, NC 28115 
BARBER, RUPERT T. JR. 41 
BARBER, WILLIAM H, Jr 124 

415 Londonberry Rd. NW 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
BARGMAN, WILLIAM J. Ill 79, 

268, 295 

110 Salisbury Dr. 

Summerville, SC 29483 
BARKER. DAN TAYLOR JR. 

132, 206, 268 

2921 Skye Dr. 

Fayetteville, NC 28303 
BARKER, PAUL 68 
BARNES, DAVID WEBSTER 120 

138, 250 

9605 River Road 

Richmond. VA 23229 
BARNES. ROBERT LAMAR JR 

166, 167 

4520 NW 19th Avenue 

Gainesville. FL 32605 
BARNES. ROBIN BRUCE 41 

141 
BARNETT. HALL FARMER 137 

184 

2875 Meadow Lane 

Henderson, NC 27536 

BARNHARDT, VIRGINIA J. 

237 

P.O. Box 665 



Mount Airy, NC 27030 
BARRAT, JAMES RODMAN 250 
Route 1 Box 714 
Shepherdstown, WV 25443 
BARRETT, MARK ROBERTSON 
268 

Route 1 Box 15 
Andrews, NC 28901 
BARRINGER, MARY WOMBLE 
134, 162. 237 
Route 2 Box 402 
Sanford, NC 27330 
BARRON, MARGARET EMILY 
220, 221 

41 The Horseshoe 
Newark, DE 19711 
BASEBALL TEAM 166. 167 
BASKETBALL 
Men's 168. 169 
Women's 170, 171 
BATES, LOUIS THOMAS 31, 84. 
127. 258, 268 
2893 Castlewood Dr. 
Atlanta. GA 30327 
BATES. PATRICIA 27. 11, 268 
5 Glenridge 
Little Rock, AR 72207 
BATES, REBECCA MADGE 9, 
114, 171, 220. 221 
316 Clarendon Ct. 
Rock Hill, SC 29730 
BATTEN, MARK WINSLOW 220 
8125 SW 52 Ave. 
Miami, FL 33143 
BAUSCHLICHER. JEFFREY W 
177 

Route 2 Box 33 
Umatilla. FL 32784 
BAYNARD. PAUL RUDD 79 
137. 250 

619 Kimberly Drive 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
BAZOS, JOHN STEPHEN1I 3881 
NW 99th Ave. 
Coral Springs, FL 33065 
BEAN, CECIL WESLEY 120, 268 
519 26th St. NW 
Hickory, NC 28601 
BEATTIE, JOHN 65 
BEATTY, JOSEPH W. 40. 44 
BEATY, MARY D 13. 60 
BEAUFORT PROGRAM 34, 35 
BEAVER, SCOTT KYLE 127 
1641 Marvelle Ave. 
Rocky Mount, NC 27801 
BECK, CURTIS VANCE 118. 
119. 268 
1920 Shirley Dr. 
Burlington. NC 27215 
BECK. TODD ALAN 237. 242 
1001 Parry Ave. 
Palmyra. NC 08065 
BECK. WARREN FINDLAY 268. 
195 

2509 Lakemoor Dr. 
Knoxville, TN 37920 
BEEKER, EDWARD CARR II 29 
138. 268 
604 Colgate St. 
Durham. NC 27704 
BEEN, BETH ANN 35. 134, 250 

Pickens, WV 26230 
BELL, KATHERINE FRAZER 268 
1311 Williamson Dr 
Raleigh, NC 27608 
BENEDICT, JOHN EDWARD 79, 
128, 237 

10840 Springknoll 
Potomac, MD 20854 
BENNER. EILEEN DORIS 37. 
237 

1812 Maplewood Dr 
Johnson City. TN 37601 
BENNER. TERESA LEE 221 
Route 6 Box 860 



296 Index /Advertisements 




Every Color Under The Sun 



TUSCARORA YARNS, 

INC. 



The Fashion Yarn Company That Enjoys 
Doing Good Things For People. 



Martin B. Foil, Jr., President 
Class of 1955 

Mount Pleasant, 
North Carolina 



Index /Advertisements 297 




Tee Shirts 
Decals 
Class Rings 
Pottery & Glassware 



Sweatshirts 
Plates 

Campus Scenes 
Books 



Fairview, NC 28730 
BENNETT, WILLIAM BYRON 

189. 268 

829 West Wesley Rd. 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
BENSINGER, STEPHANIE L. 

114, 238 

56 Woodley 

Winnetka, IL 60093 
BERNARD, RICHARD RYERSON 

20, 40, 295 
BERNHARDT, STEPHEN F. 184, 

193, 220, 222 

810 Dover Rd. 

Greensboro, NC 27408 
BERSON, WILLIAM N. II 250 

8 Glendale Rd. 

Summit, NJ 07901 
BIDDLE, LINDSAY LOUISE 117, 

141, 250 

807 Jones Street 

Old Hickory, TN 37138 
BIEDENBACH. EDDIE 168 
BIGGER, WILLIAM JOHN 220, 

227 

1932 Byrnes Road 

North Augusta. SC 29841 
BIGGERS, JAMES NEAL 

Box 988 

Welch, WV 24801 
BIGGS. THOMAS HOWARD 

128, 268 

11710 Magruder Ln. 

Rockville, MD 20852 
BINGHAM, EUGENE B. 178 
BINKLEY. CRAIG LEE 131, 177 

Route 4 Box 155L 

Newton. NC 28658 
BISHOP, DIGGS SCOTT 35 

RFD 1 

Earlysville, VA 22936 
BLACK, GEORGIA 63. 65 
BLACK, JANET WARD 157, 

268, 270, 294 



210 N. Cannon Blvd. 

Kannapolis, NC 28081 
BLACKMAN, JOHN MARVIN 

137, 177 

300 Warsaw Road 

Clinton. NC 28328 
BLACK STUDENT COALITION 

75, 76 
BLAKE, BETSY ANNE 123, 237 

Route 10 Box 401 

Winston Salem, NC 27107 
BLAKE. CHARLES HENRY II 

220 

5144 39th Street South 

St. Petersburg. FL 33711 
BLAKE, MICHAEL C. 82, 120, 

230, 237 

712 Westborough Rd. 

Knoxville, TN 37919 
BLEDSOE, SUSAN KAY 268 

1 Beach Drive 2406 

St. Petersburg. FL 33701 
BLISS, FRANK WALKER, JR. 1, 

41 
BLOOD, WILLIAM DANIEL 184 

2054 Bayou Drive 

Orchard Lake. Ml 48033 
BLOUNT, MARGARET ANN 134, 

237 

720 Farnham Dr. 

Richmond, VA 23235 
BOARDMAN, LISA ALLYN 93, 

95, 237 

701 Balmoral Road 

Winter Park, FL 32789 
BOARDMAN, LORI ANN 85, 86, 

268, 294, 295 

701 Balmoral Road 

Winter Park, FL 32789 
BOHRER, DIANA EMILY 93, 

162, 220, 221 

3607 Groometown Rd. 

Greensboro. NC 27407 
BOLDING, WILLIAM H. 60. 96. 



105 
BOLEN, CAROLYN HILL 250 

Box 204 Rt. 5 

Galax, VA 24333 
BOLTON, DANA JAMES 130, 

131. 268 

136 Lakeside Dr. 

Oakdale. NY 11769 
BOND. JULIAN 76, 88, 143 
BONDURANT, NANCY VANCE 

120, 171, 192 

623 Greenwood Rd. 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
BOON. LINDA G. 130, 135. 268 

976 Viking Drive 

Stone Mountain. GA 30083 
BOONE, DAVID WARNER 128, 

250 

4918 Rembert Drive 

Raleigh, NC 27612 
BOOTH, GEORGE EDWARD 

127, 159, 237 

3400 Chevington Rd. 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
BOOZE, CATHY 105 
BOSSONG, JOSEPH C. JR. 220. 

230 

P.O. Box 789 

Asheboro, NC 27203 
BOST. CATHEY COWLES 134 

BOST. ELMER 60 
BOUDREAU, CAROLINE F. 95. 

118, 237 

3607 Buffington PI. 

Greensboro, NC 27410 
BOULWARE, DAVID CHANDLER 

220, 230 

201 Hiawatha Trail 

Lakeland. FL 33803 
BOULWARE. JARMAL 

WYNDALE 77. 250 

1741 Campbellton Rd. SW 

Atlanta, GA 30311 
BOUNDS, GREGORY MILLARD 



177, 237 

Route 2 Box 52 

Mt. Olive, NC 28365 
BOURNE, RICHMOND W. Ill 132 

4412 Stagecoach Rd. 

Kingsport, TN 37664 
BOWDEN. ROBERT H. 31. 72, 

137 

3712 Manton Dr. 

Lynchburg, VA 24503 
BOWEN. EDWYN TAYLOR III 

206, 220 

793 Arbor Road 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
BOYCE, BARBARA MOORE 

134, 268. 275. 291 

7802 Topaz Road 

Richmond, VA 23228 
BOYD, WILHEMINA KAY 237 

519 W. Council St. 

Salisbury, NC 28144 
BOYER, KENNETH HALEY 226 

210 Raleigh Ave. 

Hampton, VA 23661 
BOYER. LISA 171. 192, 202 
BOYER, TIMOTHY STERLING 83 

P.O. Box 1447 

Hampton, VA 23661 
BRADBERRY. JOHN GROGAN 

137 

932 Terrace Acres 

Auburn. AL 36830 
BRADFORD, ROBERT 

STEWARD 

535 West Second Ave. 

Wmdermermeare, FL 32786 
BRADHAM, JOHN MCLEOD 

46 Murray Blvd. 

Charleston. SC 29401 
BRADLEY, CHARLES D. 227 

124 Sheffield 

Greenwood. SC 29646 
BRADY, ALAN EDWARD 131 

5502 SW 1st Court 



298 Index/Advertisements 



Planlation. FL 33317 
BRADY. SCOTT CHARLES 220. 

226 

21604 First Si 

Laytonsville. MD 20760 
BRANDON. FANNIE 123 
BRANDON. WELDON SCOTT 

212 38th Ave N 

Mytrle Beach. SC 29577 
BRANIGAN. MICHELLE MARIE 

5522 Sheldon Df 

Alexandria. VA 22312 
BRANNEN. ROBERT B JR 127. 

177 

Rt 5 Country Club Rd 

Statesboro. GA 30458 
BRAUER. CAPTAIN ALBERT G 

59 
BRAWLEY. LISA CAMILLE 10. 

26. 258. 268 

6211 Sardis Road 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
BRAY. KATHERINE MAUZE 136. 

171. 237 

169C Tresure Way 

PO Box 1 

San Antonio. TX 78209 
BRAZELL. ELIZABETH DAWN 

117. 160. 180. 250 

455 Hoards Ferry Rd 

Atlanta. GA 30328 
BREARLEY. LADSON M JR 

220 

Rt 1 Box c-64 

Hamlet. NC 28345 
BREIDENSTINE. JOHN DAVID 

127. 194. 195. 237 

1313 Hunsicker Rd 

Lancaster. PA 17601 
BRENDLE. BENJAMIN SCOTT 

177. 220. 227 

Route 1 Box 153 

Yadkmville. NC 27055 
BRENNAN. ANNE GRANVILLE 

258 

2114 S Live Oak Pkwy 

Wilmington. NC 28401 
BRICE. ELIZABETH RIVES 128. 

237 

203 Augusta Street 

Easley. SC 29640 
BRIDWELL. SHARON LEE 268 

4243 Nelby Drive 

Stone Mountain. GA 30083 
BRIGHT. FRANK SOYARS 

118 N Hermitage 

Lookout Mountain. TN 37350 
BRISCOE. CYNTHIA LEIGH 117. 

250 

3050/30 M Mitchell 

Atlanta. GA 30327 
BROADWELL. FREDERICK F 39 

618 Palmetto St. 

Spartanburg. SC 29302 
BROCKWAY. JOHN P 40 
BROOKS. CHERYL 128 

235 Sandpme Road 

Indialantic. FL 32903 
BROOKS. ELIZABETH ROGERS 
114. 221 

5 Ballantree Dr. 

Asheville. NC 28803 
BROOKS. SARGEANT FIRST 

CLASS 

LAWRENCE E 59 
BROST. BRIAN CHARLES 21. 
132. 162. 163. 193. 294 

4012 Piedmont Drive 

Huntsville. AL 35802 
BROTHERTON. TIMOTHY H 39 

Rt 7 Box 900 

Mooresville. NC 28115 
BROWN. ANDREW MELTON 87. 
110. 122. 123. 125. 217. 252. 

268. 275. 293. 294 
2448 Evergreen 
Royal Oak. Ml 48073 
BROWN. JAMES FRANKLIN 
120. 250 
1805 Fisher Trail 
Atlanta. GA 30345 



BROWN. JAMES MILTON JR 

118. 138 

58 1 1 Donegal Drive 

Charlotte. NC 28212 
BROWN. JAME LYNN 162. 268 

221 Piercy Road 

Morganton. NC 28655 
BROWN. LESLIE ANN 220. 221 

1905 Stanton Rd 

Kmston. NC 28501 
BROWN. LINDA SUE 250 

101 1 Riberside Blvd 

Lumberton. NC 28358 
BROWN. MARY KATHRYN 134. 

268 

333 S Candler St Decatur. 

GA 30030 
BROWN. RACHEL LYNN 237 

1011 Riverside Blvd 

Lumberton. NC 28358 
BROWN. RHETT LEROY 95. 

220. 230 

1326 Park Hill Dr 

Gainesville. GA 30501 
BROWN. ROBERT STEWART 

JR. 

1449 Grove Rd. 

Pittsburgh. PA 15236 
BROWN. SUEJETTE LANIER 

134. 268 

303 Meadowbrook Terrace 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
BROWNE. H HOWARD III 74. 

128. 165. 172. 193. 268. 270 

2011 Pinewood Circle 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
BOYHILL. B. CLAIRE 

135 Claron PI. SE 

Lenoir. NC 28645 
BROYLES. ANTHONY WILSON 

62. 127. 237 

3831 Chancellorsville 

Montgomery. AL 361 1 1 
BRUBAKER. RICHARD LEE 41 
BRUCE. ROBERT W 35. 237 

P.O. Box 601 

Greenville. SC 29602 
BRUCK. STEPHANIE JANE 117. 

162. 237 

210 Red Hill Rd. 

Orange. VA 22960 
BRUEGGEMANN. JAMES B 

132. 184. 206. 220. 227 

135 Bompart 

Webster Groves. MO 63119 
BRUNS. DAVID ANDREW 

109 Lyle Circle 

York. PA 17403 
BRYAN. HORACE, ALDEN 41 
BRYAN. LESLIE JANE 103, 134. 

175, 237 

Regency Apt. F-3 

Tifton. GA 31794 
BRYANT, BETH MARIE 

2812 W 19th St. 

Wilmington, DE 19806 
BRYANT. JOHN PATRICK 131, 

220. 227 

77 Main Street 

Garden City. GA 31408 
BRYANT. SHARON LYNN 128. 

192. 237 

144 Otari Drive 

Kingsport. TN 37660 
BUCHANAN. JAMES ROBERT 

118. 218. 250 

Route 12 Box 130 

Sanford. NC 27330 
BUCKHOLTS. THOMAS DAVID 

177. 220. 226 

Route 2 Box 262 

Tennille. GA 31089 
BUCKLEY. LISA ANN 123. 268 

94 Tulip Street 

Summit, NJ 07901 
BUCKLEY. WILLIAM F 88. 143 
BUCKNER. KARRIE EVAN 250 

P.O. Box 15 

Tryon. NC 28782 
BURKS. ROBERT TUCKER 268 

705 Windsor Avenue 



Anderson. SC 29621 
BURNARD. GREGORY G 270 

3466 Gunston Road 

Alexandria. VA 22303 
BURNETT. JOHN NICHOLAS 41 
BURR. PETER ANDERSON 184. 

185. 237 

50 Northledge 

Amherst. NY 14226 
BURRIS. BRUCE TODD 60 
BURRIS. MARK WAYNE 39 

PO Box 1206 

Albemarle. NC 28001 
BURTON, AMY FLEMING 162. 

220. 221 

100 Sharon Ct 

Athens, GA 30606 
BURTON. OFFICER CHARLES 

60 
BURTS, ANNAMARIE 61 
BURTS, RICHARD CLYDE 60. 

291 
BUSH. LAURA 83. 250 

1015-5 Monte Sand 

Augusta, GA 30904 
BUTLER. BRIAN CRAIG 93. 95. 

117 

3520 Teton Circle 

Birmingham. AL 35216 
BUTLER, FREDERICK C III 137 

2312 Blythe Road 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
BYERS, EARL STEVENSON 220. 

226 

450 Summit Ave 

Statesville. NC 28677 
BYNUM. DIANNE MARIETTA 

220. 231 

l32Shasta Lane 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
BYNUM. WILLIAM B JR. 177 

202 Pine Street 

Rocky Mount, NC 27801 
BYRD. JOHN W 202 



CAIN, JOHN MALONEY 137, 

250 

2440 Banchory Rd. 

Winter Park. FL 32792 
CAIN, LAURENCE S. 41 
CALDWELL, EARL 65 
CALDWELL, NATHAN SCOTT 

138. 220 

Rt 2 Box 392 

Newton. NC 28658 
CALTON, WILLIAM C. JR. 127, 

237 

2912 Monarch Drive 

Charlotte. NC 28208 
CALVIN, JOSEPH HIRMAN III 22 

4141 Woodlawn Dr 

Nashville, TN 37205 
CAMPANELLA. JOEL GENE 

58 W Shore Dr. 

Pennington. NJ 18534 
CAMPBELL. ARTHUR 

MALCOLM 11. 237 

6301 Cantrell 

Little Rock. AR 72207 
CAMPBELL. CARY DODD 270 

2552 Habersham Rd 

Atlanta. GA 30305 
CAMPBELL. SARAH PAYNE 1. 

74. 95. 270 

Rt 1 Box 360 

Doswell. VA 23047 
CAMPBELL. SCOTT OLIVER 22. 

131. 250 

8218 Overbury Rd. 

Richmond. VA 23227 
CAMPBELL. SUSAN KENT 80. 

114. 221 

34 Parks Avenue 

Newnan. GA 30263 
CANTWELL. KATHY SUSAN 

123. 250 

P.O. Box 67 

Clermont. FL 32711 



CARDWI ' R JR 

132. 220. 230 
1909 Indian H 
Lynchburg, VA 24503 
CARNEGIE. PS 61 
CARPENTER. JONATHAN B 
220. 226 
708 E Mam 
Cher ryvilte. NC 2802 1 
CARPENTER. MARY 114. 250 
1208 Rennie Avenue 
Richmond. VA 23227 
CARR. DAVID RUDDLE 75. 137, 
227. 250 
507 Cohane Dr 
Clinton. NC 28328 
CARR. SHEILA 79. 1 14. 220. 
231 

PO Box 1012 
Clinton. NC 28328 
CARROLL. FELIX ALVIN JR 43 
CARROLL. JOHN R 137. 148. 
165. 168 

7109 Panorama Dr 
Rockville, MD 20855 
CARTEE. THOMAS E JR 132. 
270 

461 S Peace Haven Rd 
Winston Salem. NC 27103 
CARTER. CLARK EDWARD 127. 
193. 210. 237 
2109 Heatherly Rd 
Kingsport. TN 37660 
CARTER. DONALD STEVEN 74. 
75. 137. 270. 294 
811 Sherwood Rd 
Gainesville. GA 30501 
CARTER. JEFFREY DAVID 193. 
230. 240. 295 
10 Obtuse Rocks Rd 
Brokktield Ctr. CT 06805 
CARTER. KATHRYN 16. 114, 
220. 221. 232. 248 
236 Richmond Rd 
Salisbury. NC 28144 
CARTER. LOCKEY YANCEY JR 
137 

2109 Heatherly Rd 
Kingsport. TN 37660 
CARTER. WILLIAM D JR 123. 
124 

417 Caswell Bch Rd. 
Southport. NC. 28461 
CARTMILL. THOMAS A 103, 
179. 202 CASE, VERNA M 42 
CASH. LISA DAVIS 114. 220, 
221 

29 Breezemont Ave 
Riverside. Ct 06878 
CASSELL. TIMOTHY ARNOLD 
East Round Hill Rd. 
Greenville. SC 29609 
CASSENS. LINDA JOAN 180. 
220. 221 
Route 3 Box 362 
Ft Pierce. FL 33450 
CATES. CHARLES CURTISS 
Fremont Street 
Faison. NC 28341 
CAULEY. LANIER STEWART 92. 
93 

501 Lynchburg Court 
Mobile. AL 36608 
CEFALO. MARIE T. 15, 165. 
213. 250 

430 Lake Shore Ln 
Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
CHAFFIN. MARGARET R 221 
9649 Farr Lane 
Richmond. VA 23235 
CHAMPLAIN. LAURA MICHELE 
134. 250 

4901 Lansing St NE 
St Petersburg. FL 33703 
CHATER. WILLIAM A 131. 177. 
270 

PO Box 4168 
Charlotte. NC 28209 
CHAVEZ CINDY ANN 24. 270 
P O Box 452 
Pittsboro. NC 27312 



Index /Advertisements 299 



CHEEK, JAMES WHITNEY 74, 

87, 110, 122, 123, 258, 270, 

295 

17 Melrose Ave. 

Asheville, NC 28804 
CHEEK, JULIANNA 23, 128 

317 Engleman Ave. 

Burlington, NC 27215 
CHEERLEADING SQUAD 196- 

197 
CHENEY, JUUEANNE C 209, 

270. 295 

Plantation Dr. 

Thomasville, GA 31792 
CHENNEVEAU, DIDIER 264, 267 

144 Chemin Des Roches 

41350 Vineuil 

France -0630 
CHRISTIAN, CLAIBORNE A. 73, 

135, 137, 270, 275, 294 

62 James Lndg. Rd. 

Newport News, VA 23606 
CHRISTIANSON, ERIC 141 
CHRISTIE. KATHERINE 61 
CHUNG. JOHN JAY 118. 270, 

295 

8618 Ewing Dr. 

Bethesda, MD 20034 
CLARK, CYNTHIA ANNE 95, 

128, 162, 219, 250, 295 

2822 Foster Ridge Dr. 

Atlanta, GA 30345 
CLARK, FRANK A. 105, 120, 

138, 250 

Rt 5 Box 333 

Oxford. NC 27565 
CLARK. JOHN 61. 91 
CLARK. KATHRYN JEAN 162. 

220, 221 

2822 Foster Ridge Dr. 

Atlanta. GA 30345 
CLARK, LLOYD ASHLEY 220, 

231 

999 Botany Lane 

Rockledge, FL 32955 
CLARK, RUTH ANNE 220-221 

1091 Ostrander Rd. 

East Aurora. NY 14052 
CLARK, THOMAS FETZER 42 
CLARK, THOMAS W. 132. 206, 

270. 275 

1091 Ostrander Rd. 

East Aurora, NY 14052 
CLINKSCALES, CARLTON M 

120, 138, 220, 231 

3589 Knollwood Dr. 

Atlanta, GA 30305 
CLORE. ELIZABETH LACY 

Rt 1 Box 323 

Kings Mountain, NC 28086 
CLOYED, NANCY LEA 80 

12386 Cocoanut Row 

Lake Park, FL 33410 
COBB. JOHN HOWARD 220, 

227 

18902 Pinewood Circle 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
COBB, WILLIAM HENRY 127, 

260 

203 Pineview Dr. 

Greenville, NC 27834 
COFFEY. CHARLES WELTON 

132, 235, 270 

P.O. Box 2421 

Davidson, NC 28036 
COGGINS, PAUL EDWARD 162, 

220 

24 Pinehurst Circle 

Arden, NC 28704 
COHEN, CARL 88 
COLE. RICHARD CARGILL 42 
COLECHIA, EDWARD KEVIN 
137. 167. 270 

93 Oakwood Dr. 

E Greenwich, Rl 02818 
COLEMAN, ELIZABETH B. 237, 

242 

1024 Hoperidge Ct. 

Colonial Heights, VA 23834 
COLLEGE BOWL 86, 87 



COLLINS, GEORGE BRYAN JR. 

128. 260, 262, 270 

P.O. Box 104 

North Wilkesboro, NC 28659 
COLLINS, LYMAN A. 62. 141 
THE COMMONS 112, 113 
CONCERT CHOIR 162. 163 
CONDOR, WILEY 60 
CONLEY, BYRON LAWRENCE 

138, 237 

1808 River Dr. 

Bartow, FL 33830 
CONNER. TALMADGE 65 
COOK. SERGEANT HAROLD 60. 

104 
COOK, JEROME DOUGLAS 123, 

124, 

P.O. Box 704 

Wrightsville Bch., NC 28480 
COOKSEY, NEIL CHARLES 295 

107 Bouthbrook Dr. 

Griffin, GA 30223 
COOPER. JEANETTE NEWELL 

162, 163, 221, 248, 220 

4 Orange Street 

Charleston, SC 29401 
COOPER. MICHAEL EDWARD 

24, 137, 271. 294, 295 

3839 Sweetbriar Rd. 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
CORNELL. JEAN S. 42 
CORRIGAN, TRACY 266. 267 
CORRINER, BILL 68 
CORS, BRADLEY, LESLIE 128, 

250 

6704 Miami Bluff Dr. 

Mariemont, OH 45227 
COUCH, THOMAS WILLIAM 

BOND 202 
COUTANT. DAWNE K. 134 

2259 Ashbury Dr. 

Clearwater, FL 33516 
COVELL. JEAN BLUE 134, 135, 

162, 250 

1941 Seville Dr. 

Pensacola, FL 32503 
COVINGTON, BUSTER 68 
COVINGTON. HOWARD 202 
COWDERY, TODD SHAWL 157, 

162. 163. 250, 294 

3611 Saint Marks Rd. 

Durham, NC 27707 
COX, JAMES STEDMAN 137, 

177 

132 Lakeshore 

Denver. NC 28037 
COX, RONALD MURRAY 150, 

250 

Route 12 Box 620c 

Sanford, NC 27330 
COXE. DAVID ROBERTSON 177, 

220, 226 

5125 Vernon Spr Trl 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
CRAMPTON, CORDELIA A. 271 

1106 Rugby Rd. 

Charlottesville, VA 22903 
CRANFORD, MARY ELIZABETH 

35. 134, 191, 271, 275. 291. 

195 

4928 King Richard Rd. 

Jacksonville, FL 32210 
CRENSHAW, ARI DAVID 

6406 /B The Plaza 

Charlotte, NC 28215 
CRITTENBERGER, AMELIA F. 

171, 174, 175, 221. 250 

1011 Dead Run Dr. 

Mclean, VA 22101 
CRONE. WILLIAM WALTER 117. 

237 

555 Moorington Dr. 

Naples. FL 33940 
CROOKE. THOMAS LEONARD 

117, 220 

434 N. Main 

P.O. Box 261 

Wingate. NC 28174 
CROSBY. MARGARET KENT 

110. 134. 196. 250 



5060 E Quincy 
Englewood, CO 80111 
CROSLAND. CATHERINE D 

220, 221 

1 1 1 Frontier Trail 

Buford, GA 30518 
CROSS COUNTRY 172, 173 
CROSS. KATHERINE SUSAN 

237 

442 Mowbray Arch 

Norfolk. VA 23507 
CROSS, REBECCA 134, 271 

RT 1 Box 54J 

Elizabethtown, NC 28337 
CROWDER, JOHN PHILLIP 127, 

188, 189, 237 

249 Edgewood Rd. 

Statesville, NC 28677 
CROWE, JAMES EARL JR. 127, 

231, 294 

2915 Bitting Rd. 

Winston-Salem, NC 27104 
CRUCIANI. LINDA MARIE 18. 

118, 245, 271 

7010 Terrace Dr. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
CRUM, RICHARD ERIC 127, 

271, 275, 294 

3355 Allendale PI 

Montgomery, AL 36111 
CULP, CHRISTOPHER JOHN 

127, 250, 260 

5030 Cunningdale Ct 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
CULPEPPER, RICHARD DALE 

104, 124 

104 Creekmore, 

Greenville, MS 38701 
CURRIE, ROBERT ARROWOOD 

62, 96 
CURRIER, CHARLES JEFFREY 

131. 132, 167 

4218 Oak Forest Dr. 

Atlanta. GA 30319 
CURRY, LAURA ANN 134, 250 

1030 W 53 Terr. 

Kansas City. MO 64112 

D 

DAGENHART. SARAH K. 74. 

162, 175, 237, 294 

1601 Biltmore Dr. 

Charlotte, NC 28207 
DAISLEY, MICHEL O 61 
DALLAS, JOHN SANDERS III 

127 

1410 Heathcliff Rd. 

High Point, NC 27260 
DALTON. JANICE 140, 271 

Rt 7 Box 109 

Mooresville, NC 28115 
DALTON, PAIGE BRIGHT 220. 

221, 228 

115 Old Cabin Lane 

Kernersville, NC 27284 
DANIELS, CHRISTOPHER J. 

137, 271 

222 E Home Ave. 

Hartsville. SC 29550 
DAUGHERTY, EDWARD L. 35, 

218, 240 

108 West Wesley Rd. 

Atlanta. GA 30305 
DAVID, WILLIAM EZIO 31. 120, 

237 

1013 Village Greenway 

Cary, NC 27511 
DAVIDSON, CHALMERS 

GASTON 62, 218 
DAVIDSON CHRISTIAN 

FELLOWSHIP 84, 85 
DAVIDSON EMERGENCY 

RESCUE SERVICE 82-83 
DAVIDSON, ROBERT W. 63 
THE DAVIDSONIAN 92. 93 
DAVIES, MARK I 19, 40 
DAVIS, ELLIS RHYNE 

440 Caldwell 

Concord. NC 28025 



DAVIS, EMILY 134, 237 

3914 Brookfield Ave. 

Louisville. KY 40207 
DAVIS. JAMES ANDREW 80, 

128, 250 

P.O. Box 36 

Hortense, GA 31543 
DAVIS, MARK 271 
DAVIS, MARY TRUE 74, 134, 

135, 250 

608 W Barrington St. 

Dunn, NC 28334 
DAVIS. RICHARD HUGH JR. 

123, 124, 250 

6000 Siebert 

Midland. Ml 48640 
DAVIS, SANDRA LEIGH 120, 

271 

1878 Trumbull Dr. 

Dunwoody, GA 30338 
DAVIS. STEPHEN L. 42 
DEAN, WALTER WILSON 127. 

162. 163 

33 Briarwood Rd. 

Asheville, NC 28804 
DEATON. ROBERT WHITE 226 

333 Glen Eagles Rd. 

Statesville. NC 28677 
DECK, STEWART LINTON 

2502 Hillwood Place 

Charlottesville, VA 22901 
DEMPSEY, BERT J. Ill 

19 Westlyn Dr. 

Rome, GA 30161 
DENDY, DAVID WILKES 220 

709 Elizabeth Dr. 

Orange. CA 92667 
DENNIS, BROWN W. JR. 

76 Palisades Rd. 

Atlanta, GA 30309 
DENT, JOHN M. Ill 15. 271 

206 W. 26th St. 

Tifton, GA 31794 
DERR. JAMES 65 
DESIENO. ROBERT P. 62 
DESIENO, TIMOTHY BARRETT 

220 

Box 453 

Davidson. NC 28036 
DETWEILER. CRAIG NELSON 

70, 71, 220, 227 

1231 Brockton Lane 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
DEWEY, ALICIA MARION 85. 

134. 237 

11025 N Cntry Squire 

Houston, TX 77024 
DICK, ANTHONY WHITE III 220. 

23011 95 A Schofield Cir. 

Fort Riley. KS 6642 
DICK. THEODORE STEVEN 237 

1129 Mercer Dr. 

Tallahassee, FL 32312 
DICKEY, SUZANNE SARAH 134, 

211, 237 

764 Bayou Liberty Rd. 

Slidell, LA 70458 
DILLON, JAMES MICHAEL 131. 

177. 271, 275 

1906 Coventry Cir. 

Huntsville. AL 35801 
DISHMAN. BENJAMIN E. 

904 Riverwood Ct. 

Franklin, TN 37064 
DOCKERY. AMELIA 63 
DOCKERY. CHARLES E. 42 
DODD. SALLY PENDLETON 

134, 271 

4715 Rolfe Rd 

Richmond. VA 23226 
DOMINICK, RICHARD LANE 

127, 245. 270 

1 1 Bonita Dr 

Birmingham, AL 35209 
DONAHOWER. DAVID WILLS 

35, 132, 250 

Tinker Hill Rd. 

Phoenixville, PA 10460 
DONLEY, WILLIAM P. JR. 159, 

237. 295 



300 Index/ Advertisements 



302 Lous Way 
Louisville. KY 40207 
DONOVAN. WILLIAM HAt. 
117. 172. 237 
6612 Hunters Lane 
Durham. NC 27713 
DORSETT. STUART B 137. 271. 
294. 295 
2501 Wake Dr 
Raleigh. NC 27608 
DOTSON. AMANDA ALYSON 
16. 114. 220-221 
2422 Southgale 
Houston, TX 77030 
DOUGLAS. CHARLES THOMAS 
126 127. 198. 272 
2834 Bitting Rd 

n Salem. NC 27104 
DOUGLAS. GEORGE WALKER 
127. 220 
2834 Bitting Rd 
Winston Salem. NC 27014 
DOUGLASS. ELIZA KNOX 273. 
275 

1416 Kershaw Dr 
Raleigh. NC 27609 
DOWNING. DIANE ELAINE 27. 
273. 275 

7907 Greeley Blvd 
Sprmglield. VA 22152 
DRAINE. LISA MARIE 
315 Wateree Ave 
Columbia. SC 29205 
DRAKE. PATRICIA ANN 102. 
220 

275 Shore Road 
Westerly. Rl 02891 
DRESSER. SUSAN YANCEY 
172. 192. 220 
801 Hammond St 
Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
DRIGGERS. JOHN DAVID 220. 
226 

4114 Elderwood Dr 
Seabrook. TX 77586 
DRISKILL. ALEC EDWARD 127. 
193. 273 

1307 Liggates Rd 
Lynchburg. VA 24502 
DUBOSE. JOHN 68 
DUBOSE. RICHART TAYLOR 
118 

419 Scotland Ave 
Rockingham, NC 28379 
DUDLEY. KATHERINE L 114. 
115. 220. 221 
5307 Lyons View Dr 
Knoxville. TN 37919 
DUKE. BRYAN W 162. 272 
1601 Middle River Dr 
Ft Lauderdale. FL 33305 
DULIN. R DAVISON 42 
DUMAS. CATEIRNE S 80. 235. 
250 

3819 Hill Grand 
Durham. NC 27705 
DUNCAN. ADAM 266 
DURWAY. SINDSEY BOLIN 237 
509 Colonial Dr 
High Point. NC 27262 
DYKE. ELMER WAYNE 177. 
220. 227 
1216 Grist Mill CI. 
Knoxville. TN 37919 
DYSART. SARAH RIVERS 221 
Route 3 Box 43AA 
Rio Piedras. PR 00928 



EARNHARDT. DAVID EUGENE 

123. 124. 237 

205 South Main 

New London. NC 28127 
EASTERLING. HARRY R JR 

250. 294. 295 

716 Lakeshore Dr 

Bennettsville. SC 29512 
EASTERLING. LUND H 25. 206. 



250 

102 Brantley Hall Ln 

Longwood. FL 32750 
EBLIN. SCOTT STEWART 72. 

91. 126. 127. 250. 295 
'.tijvale Drive 

Huntington. WV 25705 
ECKERT. CLARE MAUREEN 
?35 

RFD Dana Hill Rd 

Ashland. NH 03217 
EDMONDSON. C EARL 42 
EDMONDSON. PATRICIA B 43 
EDMUNDS. JOHN STEWART G 

227 

2322 Rosalind 

Roanoke. VA 24014 
EDWARDS. JOHN A 124. 124, 

250 

602 Rocklord Rd 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
EGLIN. JOHN ARTHUR 87. 117. 

162. 238 

855 N Island Dr NW 

Atlanta. GA 30327 
EHRMAN. JAMES FREDERICK 

106. 124. 238 

721 Greenndge Ln 

Louisville. KY 40207 
EHRMANN. ALEXANDRA 266 
EISENBISE. DEBRA LEE 72. 

117. 247. 273 

3202 Romilly Rd 

Cardiff 

Wilmington. DE 19810 
ELEY. JOHN WESLEY JR 

Route 2. Box 88 

Ahoskie. NC 27910 
ELKIN. MARY ELIZABETH 92. 

114. 219. 220. 221 

P O Box 585 

Lancaster. KY 40444 
■ELLEDGE. BARRY WARD JR 

222. 227 

P O Box 204 

Boone, NC 28607 
ELLIOTT. ANNE REBECCA 115. 

171. 295 

310 Pilot St 

Durham. NC 27707 
ELLIOTT. BRUCE C. JR. 132 

13 Pinewood Drive 

Clover. SC 29710 
ELLIOTT. HAROLD WALKER 

132. 227 

1 12 Pinewood Drive 

Clover. SC 29710 
ELLIOTT. JAMES LAWRENCE 

273 

2105 White Oak 

Valdosta. GA 31601 
ELLIS. KEITH DWAYNE 77. 177 

PO Box 215 

Woodbine. GA 31569 
ELMORE. STEPHEN MARK 

600 Gardiner Rd 

Richmond. VA 23229 
ELYEA. CHARLES EMMETT 
123. 124. 238. 250 

Route 2 Box 56 

Waxhaw. NC 28173 
EMANON 118. 119. 144 
EMERSON. RONALD PAUL 21. 
132. 273 

4209 Abbott Rd. 

Orchard Park. NY 14127 
EMERY. DAVID THOMAS 120 

525 Brookforest Ln 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
ENGELL. JOHN R 44 
ENNISS. STEPHEN CROSLEY 

273 

558 Manor Ridge Dr 

Atlanta. GA 30305 
EPES. HANSFORD M JR 43 
ERVIN. MARGARET BELL 131. 

217. 238 

104 Woodside Place 

Morganton. NC 28655 
ERVIN. ROBERT CRAWFORD 



79. 27 

104 Woodside Place 
NC 28655 
. REID HARDING JR 222. 

230. 295 

802 Bethel Rd 

;.inlon. NC 28655 
FSSMAN. BRADLEY EUGENE 

222 

18th Avenue NE 

St Petersburg. FL 33704 
ESTOCK. ROBERT G 3. 194. 

195. 202. 203 
ETC 120. 121 
ETTEDGUI. DANIEL 35. 124. 

273. 295 

4309 Harilieid 

Westlake. CA 91361 
EVANS, DAVID 273. 295 

P O Box 668 

Chatham. VA 24531 
EVANS. EDWIN CUTTINO 222. 

227 

PO Box 668 

Chatham. VA 24531 
EVANS, JAMES ELEY 132. 273 

1409 Cherry Lane 

Virginia Beach, VA 23454 
EVANS. KEITH ALLEN 227 

171 Pine Way 

New Providence. NJ 07974 
EVANS. MARGARET T 36. 37 

PO Box 668 

Chatham. VA 24531 
EVANS, THOMAS K.W. 222. 230 

334 E Church St 

Laurmburg. NC 28352 
EVERETT. LUCY WILLINGHAM 

79. 219. 222. 260 

303 S Claiborne St 

Goldsboro. NC 



FAIRES. ERIC STEVEN 250 

PO Box 210 

Huntsville. TN 37756 
FANNIE AND MABLE 122. 123 
FANT. MARY PACOLETTE 238. 

295 

Rt. 1 Summerfield Frm. 

Independence. VA 24348 
FARABOW. WILLIAM CLINTON 

1009 Pine Needle Ln 

Thomasville. NC 27360 
FARLEY. ROBERT G JR. 222. 

230 

2674 Shaywen Circle 

Snellville. GA 30278 
FARRELL, EDWARD 178. 186. 

196. 202. 203 
FARRIOR. RUTH LATIMER 22. 

221. 223 

405 Whisnant St 

Shelby. NC 28105 
FAULKENBERRY. CINDY LOU 

273. 294 

18425 Kmgshill Rd 

Germantown. MD 20767 
FAULKNER. JAMES C 137. 252 

PO Box 186 

Paris. KY 40361 
FERGUSON. DENISE ANN 134. 

221. 253 

2904 Garth Rd SE 

Huntsville. AL 35801 
FERGUSON. JOHN BRIAN 132. 

206. 242 

P O Box 5003 

Anderson. SC 29623 
FERRARI. VICTOR STEVEN 252 

3121 Sharon Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
FICHTNER. ERIC GORDON 85. 

132. 159. 242. 252 

3290 Sewell Mill Rd 

Marietta. GA 30062 
FIELD. ELLEN WARE 128. 238 

PO Box 1449 

Pmehurst. NC 28374 



120. 

138 . 

PO Box 2067 
Sebrmg. FL 33870 
FIELDS. MARCi 
31. 126. 217. 273 
733 Catawba 
Raleigh. NC 27609 
FIJI 124. 126 

FINCH. ROBERT MAXWELL 108. 
123. 124. 125. 242 
274 S Elm St 
Commerce. GA 30529 
HNM Af f I IZABETH W 134. 
238 

35 Oakhurst Rd 
Cape Elizabeth. ME 04107 
FINEGAN. CATHERINE V 128. 
238 

326 5th St NW 
Hickory. NC 28601 
FINGER. CRAIG FRANCIS 273 
1 18 Charles River Landing 
Williamsburg. VA 23185 
FINK. ERIC EUGENE 120. 138. 
238. 294 
PO Box 344 
Faith. NC 2804 1 
FINNERTY. ELIZABETH E 248. 
273 

160 Chinquapin Pi 
Athens. GA 30605 
FISHBACK. NASON JR 127. 
167. 189 
423 8th Street 
Brookings. SD 57006 
FLANAGAN. BRAIN FRANCIS 
138. 222. 227 
2514 Hollmgswonh 
Lakeland. FL 33803 
FLANDERS. ELIZABETH B 128. 
238 

2934 Palmer Ave 
New Orleans. LA 70118 
FLEMING. JOANNA 191. 231. 
252 

1970 Upshur St NW 
Washington. DC 20011 
FLEMING. JOHN DAVID 36. 37. 
132. 252 

2651 St Marys Street 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
FLEMMA. ROBERT JOHN R. 
8315 N River Road 
River Hills. Wl 53217 
FLOOD. PAUL E 132 
P.O. Box 1515 
Fayetteville. NC 28301 
FLOWERS. DAVID LESLIE 184 
1233 Forest Ave 
Columbus. GA 31906 
FOGELMAN. URSULA 13 
FOIL. MARTIN BOGER III 
556 Hermitage Dr SE 
Concord. NC 28025 
FOLCHER. DEBORAH LYNNE 
134 

614 Dawson Road 
Wahiawa. HI 96786 
FOOTBALL 176. 177 
FORD. JOSEPH P JR 72. 105. 
126. 127. 273 
2651 Laurelwood Rd 
Doraville. GA 30360 
FORE. SUSAN LYNN 114. 221. 
223 

3002 St Regis Rd 
Greensboro. NC 27408 
FOREMAN. SYDNEY FANT 141. 
238. 262 
225 Via Genda 
Newporl Beach. CA 92663 
FOREMAN. TAMARA 172. 192 
9300 Navios 
Huntsville. AL 35803 
FORIO PHOEBE ELLIS 111. 
142. 273. 295 
2050 Country Sq Lane 
Marietta. GA 30062 



Index /Advertisements 301 



FOSSETT, SANDRA FRANCES 
72 

540 Clairmont Road 
Decatur, GA 30030 
FRANK, JEFF 178, 188, 189, 

202. 203 
FRANKHOUSER, HULDAH M. 

120, 170, 171, 192, 231, 252 
Route 1 

Sylvania. GA 30467 
FRANZ, THOMAS JUDE 238 

1306 Sherwood 

Glenview, IL 60025 
FRAZIER, SHERRI MARIE 

Route 2 Box 137 

Claremont, NC 28610 
FREDERICKSON, JAMES M. 44 
FREEMAN, DEBRA ELAINE 252. 

295 

P.O. Box 277 

Melrose, FL 32666 
FRENCH. DIRK 44 
FRENCH. JANIE K. 16. 63 
FRENCH, WESLEY AARON 

3949 Vermont Road 

Atlanta, GA 30319 
FROMM, KRIS ANDREW 226 

Rd. 5 

Bloomsburg, PA 17815 
FROST. CHRISTOPHER 

POWELL 44 
FROST, LINDA T. 45 
FRY, PAUL JEFFREY 102, 120 

12300 Oakland Hills 

Concord, TN 37922 
FRYE, KEITH 68 
FRYE, MARY STEVENSON 

Box 835 

Robbins, NC 27325 
FRYMAN, DAVID BONNER 198 

1948 Fishinger Rd. 

Columbus, OH 43221 
FULLER, ROY CALHOUN 118, 

252, 294 

574 River St. 

Chattanooga, TN 37405 
FULLERTON, SAMUEL C. IV 

245, 273, 281. 295 

Box 1165 

Miami, OH 74354 
FUNSTEN, JAMES CHURCHILL 

Oakley Farm 

Warm Springs, VA 24484 

G 

GABLE, RALPH WILLIAM 45 
GAINES, RICHARD KENNETH 

74, 136, 137, 273, 294 

734 N. Halifax Dr. 

Ormond Beach, FL 32074 
GAITHER, JAMES COMER JR. 

177, 206, 226 

Route 3 

Newton, NC 28658 
GALILEY, SARAH LOUISE 150. 

238 

15 Manor Hill Road 

Summit, NJ 07901 
GANT, MARK ANTHONY 177, 

230 

1020 Chandler Ave. 

Burlington, NC 27215 
GARDNER, JOSEPH TATE, JR. 

45 
GARNER, FREDERIC H. IV 223 

Rt. 1 99 W. Highlands 

Banner Elk, NC 28604 
GASTON. DAVID AIKEN 79, 

120. 138, 238 

147 Park Drive 

Chester, SC 29706 
GASTON, HARRIETT L. 77, 79. 

128. 238 

9411 Misenheimer Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28215 
GAUCH. CHRISTINE LOUISE 95. 

252 

43 Manor Drive 

Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 



GAVEL, KIRK THOMAS 177, 
227 

2008 Lake Drive 
Winter Park, FL 32789 
GEIGER, LEAH ELIZABETH 95 
715 Mt. View Circle 
Gainesville, GA 30501 
GELLY, JAMES VAUGHAN 193 
5815 Northside Dr. NW 
Atlanta. GA 30328 
GERDES, FELIX REINER 187. 
206, 252 
812 Oakdale Rd. 
Atlanta, GA 30307 
GERDES, PHILIPP GEORGE 
812 Oakdale Rd. NE 
Atlanta, GA 30307 
GERDY, JOHN 72 
GERGOUDIS, RICHARD L. 132, 
273, 294, 295 
5400 Fitzhugh Ave. 
Richmond, VA 23226 
GERKEN, ELIZABETH ANN 83, 
128, 238 

2802 Mount Vernon Lane 
Blacksburg, VA 24060 
GEYER, ANDREA WEBSTER 
152, 238, 248 
1526 Harbour Drive 
Sarasota, FL 33579 
GIBBY, ROBERT 65 
GIBSON, FRANCES CAROLINE 
17, 223 

2624 H. Park Rd. 
Charlotte, NC 28209 
GIDUZ, WILLIAM R. 64, 262 
GILES, STEPHEN BIERCE 184 
Route 6 Box 220B 
Morganton, NC 28655 
GILLESPY, MARK CABOT 35, 
124, 125, 274 
880 John Anderson Dr. 
Ormond Beach, FL 32074 
GILLILAND, TANDY E. 84, 274 
4008 N. Galloway Dr. 
Memphis, TN 38111 
GILLISON, ROBERT W. IV 87, 
110. 122, 124, 273 
6965 Waite Hill Rd. 
Willoughby, OH 44094 
GILMORE, KARA SUZANNE 
175, 192, 213, 221, 223 
1916 Cox Road 
Matthews, NC 28105 
GINGRICH, LINDA KATHLEEN 
221, 223 
151 Howell Road 
Carrollton, G A 30117 
GLANCE. JONATHAN C. 91. 
118, 252, 272 
3120 Burkeshore Road 
Winston Salem, NC 27106 
GLAZE, RICHARD EDWARD JR. 
138, 206, 260, 273 
530 Archer Road 
Winston Salem, NC 27106 
GLEW, DONALD RAMSEY 
7700 Conn Ave. 
Chevy Chase, MD 20015 
GODSPELL 146, 158, 159 
GOLF TEAM 179 
GOODE, ALTHEA 117, 264 
The Oaks Ridgeway Rd. 
Surrey England -0730 
GOODE. EDWARD SEDDON 
137, 274, 294 
1321 Biltmore Dr. 
Charlotte, NC 28207 
GOODE, MICHAEL ANTHONY 
107, 110, 211, 230, 253 
2414 Glenwood Dr. NE 
Atlanta, GA 30305 
GOODLETT, ANDRE L. 77, 253 
913 Hawkinstown Rd. 
Salisbury, NC 28144 
GOODMAN, ELIZABETH I. 116, 
117, 253 
P.O. Box 607 
Candor, NC 27229 
GOODNOW, PHILIP M. 136, 



137, 274 

150 Corliss Street 
Providence, Rl 02904 
GOODWIN, ANNE ELIZABETH 

116. 117, 238 
4360 Harvester Farm 
Fairfax. VA 22032 
GOODWIN, MARK 

739 Canterbury Dr. 
Charleston, WV 25314 
GORDON, NORMAN GARY 224, 

23011 400 Center St. 

Washington Grove, ND 20880 
GORDON, PHILIP CARTER 137, 

167 

406 N. Waverly 

Farmville, NC 27828 
GORHAM. LA VONDA 221, 224 

P.O. Box 206 

Wagram, NC 28396 
GORHAM. MONICA LYNNE 

Cucumber Hill Rd. 

Foster, Rl 02825 
GOULD, ROBERT ANDREW 137, 

274 

82-3 Saddlebrook 

Wesley Chapel, FL 33599 
GOULD, WARREN NISBET 72, 

132, 219, 224, 227 

1204 Wilson Ave. 

Chambersburg, PA 17201 
GOURLEY, HUNTER A. 177. 

206, 224 

Asheville School 

Asheville, NC 28806 
GRAHAM. DOROTHY E. 117 

303 W. Bessemer 

Greensboro, NC 27401 
GRAHAM, JOHN HERBERT III 

238 

1336 Highfield Dr. 

Clearwater, FL 33516 

GRAHAM, MICHAEL TURNER 

118 

357 Tremont Cir, SE 

Lenoir, NC 28645 
GRANT, CYNTHIA THOMAS 35, 

45 
GRANT, DAVID CARROLL 35, 

45, 52 
GRANTHAM, VARDELL G III 

707 lona Street 

Fairmont, NC 28340 
GRATTO, KATHERINE ANNE 

95, 221, 224, 228 

2382 Statler Dr. 

Decatur, GA 30035 
GRAVES, RICHARD CLEMENT 

238 

2419 Lexford 

Houston, TX 77080 
GRAVES, SUSAN JANE 35, 93, 

107, 116, 117, 238, 284 

173 Adams Street 

Milton. MA 02187 
GRAY, SEDGWICK 188, 189, 

227 

1 18 Greenwich Ave. 

East Providence, Rl 02914 
GRAY. STEVEN P. 274 

633 Fenimore St. 

Winston Salem, NC 27103 
GRAY, THODORE FLINE 177, 

253 

2153 Westwind Drive 

Kingsport, TN 37660 
GRAYBEAL, DAWES DAVIE 
120, 162 

Route 2 Box 106 

Denver, NC 28037 
GREENE, JAMA BLAND 253 

2700 Wilson Lane 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
GREENE. JERRY HUNT JR. 177, 

230 

607 Regency Drive 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
GREER. GOERGE E. 166, 167. 

178, 203 
GREER, JUNE MARGARET 134, 



238 

119 Oakdale St. 
Windermere, FL 32786 
GREINER, TERRENCE A. 99, 
132. 184, 185. 206, 274 
289 Countryside Ln. 
Williamsville, NY 14211 
GRIFFIN, ALLEN WAYNE 166, 
167, 274 

10 1W Confederate Ave. 
Lancaster, SC 29720 
GRIFFIN, OFFICER JOHNNY 60 
GRIFFIN, MARY BRINSON 114, 
224, 231 
705 N. Leslie 
Goldsboro, NC 27530 
GRIFFITH, CHARLES TAYLOE 
132, 180, 224 
Boscobel 

Mt. Holly, VA 22542 
GRIFFITH. JOHN V 62. 67 
GRIFFITH, PAUL BUCKLEY 39, 
127 

Director 

Defense Nuclear Agcy 
Washington. DC 20305 
GRIGGS, EUGENE STEVEN 128, 
253 

115 York Avenue 
Kannapolis, NC 28081 
GRIGSBY, JANET P. 45 
GRIMES, THOMAS DAVID 21, 
127 

110 Bel-Laire Dr. 
Lincolnton, NC 28092 
GROVES, CLAIRE SPEARMAN 
20. 114, 225. 231 
3823 Fernleaf Rd. 
Columbia, SC 29206 
GRUBBA. GERALD ROGER 108, 
131, 177 

4890 NW 17th Street 
Plantation, FL 33317 
GUENTHER, STEPHANIE E. 274 
Rockridge 

Greenwich, CT 06830 
GUILFORD, ROXANNA IRENE 
221, 225 
4518 S. Trask 
Tampa, FL 33611 
GUIZARD, MONIQUE F. 45 
GULYN, PETER DEMETER 138, 
253 

117 Pinetree Road 
Salisbury, NC 28144 
GUNN, CHRISTOPHER SAMPLE 
128, 157, 239 
20 John Cava Lane 
Peekskill. NY 10566 
GYAUCH, BETH ELLEN 5. 118, 
141, 274, 294 
4531 Lisa Court E. 
Montogomery, AL 36106 

H 

HAAS. ELIZABETH ANN 141, 

247. 274 

5004 Sunningdale Ct. 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
HACKETT, JOHN 188-189, 264 

Grove Hse, Grove Ave. 

Dublin, Ireland -0890 
HAIGHT, SCOTT KERR 123-124. 

253 

570 Spender Trace 

Atlanta, GA 30338 
HAIN, JON MICHAEL 226 

550 Shirley Ave. 

Franklin Lakes. NJ 07417 
HALL, ALISON BENNETT 134, 

239 

205 Cedar Lane 

Pikesville, KY 41501 
HALL, COURTNEY DRU 175 

33 Grovewood Rd 

Asheville, NC 28804 
HALL. DAVID EARL 123-123, 

162, 239 

6320 Aberdeen Rd. 



302 Index/Advertisements 



Shawnee Mission. KS 66208 
HALL. JAMES MARKHAM 294 

295 

7276 Lawton 

Pittsburgh. PA 153235 
HALL. JEFFREY ALLISON 225. 

230 

212 Hlllbrook Dr 

Spartanburg. SC 29302 
HALL. SARAH ELIZABETH 114. 

221. 225. 248 

303 Robin Dr 

Somerset. KY 42501 
HALL. T HARTLEY V 

3221 Brook Rd 

Richmond VA 23227 
HALL. WARNER L 64. 115. 

131. 291. 293 

HALL.' WARNER LEANDER III 

72. 114. 274 

4000 Yadkin Dr. 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
HALL. WILLIAM FREDERICK 

124. 239 

4000 Yadkin Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
HALLER. THOMAS B 132. 179 

28 Third St 

Pulaski. VA 24301 
HAM. SARAH CATHERINE 

535 Timber Valley Rd. 

Atlanta. GA 30342 
HAMILTON. BRIAN HUGH 127. 

182 

1350 Rutledge Ave 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
HAMILTON. GLENDA LEILANI 

221. 225 

336 Hillsboro Dr. 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
HAMILTON, JEFFRIES MOCK 

93. 101. 172. 276 

42124 Stonewall Rd 

Little Rock. AR 72202 
HAMILTON. MARY LOU 175. 

221. 225 

59 Delalield Island 

Darien, CT 06820 
HAMILTON. SHANNON A. 162. 

253 

2706 53rd St 

Lubbock. TX 79413 
HAMMOND. MARK S 120. 121. 

276 

4017 Edwards Mill Rd 

Raleigh. NC 27612 
HAMPTON. GRAY WATSON 72. 

132. 226. 253 
1207 Kanawha Terr 
Huntington. WV 25701 

HANAFI. SHIRIN 112. 225. 231 

29/C Maratib AN Rd. 

Gulberl II Lahore 

Pakistsn 
HANEY. JEFFREY HOWARD 

132. 177. 277 

PO Box 221 

Black Mountain, NC 28711 
HANTZMON, RICHARD CLARK 

1413 Foxbrook Lane 

Charlottesville, VA 22901 
HARBERT. MICHAEL SIMPSON 

177. 195 

1923 Greenbrier Dr 

Charlottesville. VA 22901 
HARBIN. JAMES DEREK 132. 

253 

103 Woodbnar Dr 

Forest City. NC 28043 
HARBOTTLE. LISA MARIE 84. 

85. 148. 160. 276. 279. 294 

1900 Courtland Rd 

Alexandria. VA 22306 
HARDEN. JONATHAN HOLDER 

131 

PO Box 21408 

Greensboro. NC 27420 
HARGROVE, ELISABETH H 

114. 165. 172. 192. 221. 225 

724 West borough Rd. 

Knoxville. TN 37919 



HARKINS. DAN CLIFFORD 5. 7. 

104. 118-119. 275 

2401 NW 48th 

Oklahoma City. OK 731 12 
HARIAN. EDGARWAll JR 

253. 295 

12881 Nimes Dr 

St Louis. MO 63141 
HARMON, WILUAM PAUL 225. 

231 

3714 Inwood 

Houston. TX 77019 
HARPER. JANE CUNNINGHAM 

120. 239 

51 High Rock Rd 

Wayland. MA 01778 
HARPER. REBECCA ALLISON 

114. 231 

7439 Hwy 70 S No 207 

Nashville. TN 37221 
HARRELL, JUDY LORRAINE 77. 

225 

3104 Ruark Rd. 

Macon, GA 31201 
HARRIS. THOMAS GRIER 239 

127 Oakside Dr 

Harrisburg. NC 28075 
HARRIS, SERGEANT WILLIE 59 
HARRISON. CHARLES ANDREW 

95. 193. 225. 231 

805 Robert E Lee 

Charleston, SC 29412 
HARRISON. ROBERT E JR 276 

4901 Brooktree Dr 

Charlotte, NC 28208 
HARROLD. MICHAEL BRADLEY 

132. 253 

612 Brookwood 

Goldsboro. Bn 27530 
HARRY. PHILIP SCOTT 120. 

138. 239 

Homeland Farm 

Rixeyville, VA 22737 
HART. BEVERLY JEAN 102. 

123. 239 

637 Ridgewood 

Windermere. FL 32786 
HART. FLORENCE OLIVIA 80. 

134, 254 

P.O. Box 307 

Tazewell. VA 24651 
HART. SARAH DUNN 114. 175 

321 Melrose Ave 

Kenilworth, IL 60043 
HARTMAN, JOHN MCMASTER 

15. 33, 93. 116. 117. 276. 

284 

1407 Meadowcrest 

Charleston. WV 25314 
HARTMAN. MARK BENTLY 130. 

131. 177 

1508 South Park 

Reidsville. NC 27320 
HARTSOCK. LANGDON A 253 

1217 Biltmore Dr 

Charlotte. NC 28027 
HARWELL. LACY RANKIN JR. 

132. 276. 286 

1869 Lakewood Dr. S 

St Petersburg. FL 33712 
HARWICK. MARK CHARLES 

118. 154 

Route 2 Box 139 

Bloomsbury. NJ 00804 
HASSELL, LAURA ALICE 221 

220 Mistletoe Dr 

Greensboro. NC 27403 
HASTY. CHARLES RANSOM JR 

99. 127, 254 

120 Sun Valley Rd 

Athens. GA 30605 
HATCHER. THURSTON R III 18. 

225, 295 

9301 Sw 60th Ct. 

Miami. FL 33156 
HATFIELD. GEORGE 138. 180 
HAWK. JAMES A 35. 131. 276 

1 Meeting St 

Charleston. SC 29401 
HAWK. VICTOR HOLLAND 91, 

172. 276. 295 




BUTTERY & BEANERY 



Famous Since 1977 
"Added Attraction! — The Conery" 

3 Miles North of Davidson College 
On Route To Lake Campus 

Hwy 115 S Mt. Mourne, NC. 



Rt 1 Box 505 

Monticello. GA 31064 
HAWKINS. PAMELA ANN 99. 

141, 152. 235. 255. 276 

4914 Briar St. 

Fairfax, VA 22032 
HAY, JEROME COLLETT 78. 

276. 294 

2909 Clitlside Rd 

Kingsport. TN 37664 
HAY, SAMUEL BURNEY III 127, 

239 

8101 S Dearing Rd 

Covington, GA 30209 
HAY, SARAH BURNEY III 127, 

239 

8101 S Dearing Rd 

Covington, GA 30209 
HAY, SARAH BURNEY 134, 154 

8108 S Dearing St 

Covington. GA 30209 
HAY. WILLIAM CRAIG 127. 239 

2909 Cliffside Rd 

Kingsport. TN 37664 
HAYES. DEBORAH LYNN 128. 

171. 239 

2409 Blackburn Ct 

Virginia Beach. VA 23454 
HEALY. MICHAEL JOHN 128. 

276 

7 Polly Dr. 

Huntington. NY 11743 
HEARD, WILLIAM CURRY 146. 

225. 230, 284 

4974 Wellington Dr 

Macon. GA 31210 
HEARLE. KEITH WARREN 148. 

276. 288. 294 

11001 Cripplegate Rd. 

Potomac. MO 20854 
HEATH. JEFFREY THURSTON 

254 

8513 Southfield PI 

Raleigh. NC 27614 
HEGLAR. ROBERT BOYD 225. 

226 



6 Cardinal Dr 

Brevard. NC 28712 
HELM. MARY MCNAIR 

2503 Kensington Ave. 

Richmond, VA 23220 
HELMUS. LAURA KATHERINE 

114. 225. 231 

5141 N.E. 30th Terr 

Lighthouse, Pt, FL 33064 
HENDERSON. EDWARD C. JR. 

193. 206. 225, 227 

1205 Charles Dr. 

Laurinburg, NC 28353 
HENDRICKS. CYNTHIA L. 33. 

276. 288 

2611 Clark Rd. 

Tampa. FL 33618 
HENDRIX, JOHN DAVID JR 123. 

124. 172. 239 

112 Lord Ashley Dr 

Greenville, NC 27834 
HENJES. KURT PATRICK 227 

74 Birchall Dr 

Haddonfield. NJ 08033 
HENSON. PAUL DOUGLAS 137 

420 Bramble Lane 

Roanoke. VA 24014 
HEPPNER. CAROL 134. 171. 

174. 175. 254 

2500 Kanner Hgwy 

Stuart. FL 33404 
HERARD. LISA ANN 118. 221. 

254 

4135 Dogwood Dr 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
HERBERT. ROGER GORDON JR. 

113, 124. 177. 251 

6415 Overhill Rd 

Falls Church. VA 22042 
HERLONG. JAMES RENE 123. 

239. 295 

620 Herlong Ave. 

Rock Hill. SC 29730 
HERMAN. THOMAS WHITAKER 

22 Mill St 

Cooperstown. NY 13326 



Index /Advertisements 303 



Wj've had a record of excellence 

in business for 81 years. 
\bur s has begun at Davidson. 



Your Davidson education is a mark 
of excellence. We encourage you to 
pursue that ideal in all that you 
attempt in the future. 

Our business is making cotton 
yarns. We have a commitment to 
excellence in every facet of our 



operations: product quality, cus- 
tomer service, employee relations 
and community involvement. 

The pursuit of excellence requires 
concern and perseverance, but the 
results are always worth the price. 





twsMills- 



The Chronicle Mills 
National Yam Mills, Inc. 
Stowe Spinning Company 



100 NORTH MAIN STREET 
BELMONT. NC 28012 
704 825-5314 



HFRMFT/. TODD At AN 167. 
177. 239 

923 Morgan. Ave SW 
Cullman. At 35055 
Ml MNANIK Z-CHIROLDES. J 

ALBERTO 45. 52 
HERRIN. JEFF 93. 117. 141. 254 
P O Box 4205 
Davidson. NC 28036 
HERRNSTEIN. KARIS ANNE 93. 
239 

7706 Eagle Creek Dr 
Cenlerville. OH 45459 
HI (IRON. ELIZABETH B 2-4 
571 Keeler Woods 
Marietta. GA 33064 
HESS. PETER NEA 
HESSLER. DAVID PRATT 124 
8810 W Bonniwell Dr 
Mequon. Wl 53092 
HICKLIN. ROBERT W 203 
HICKS. EUGENE CLIFTON IV 
184. 230 

2216 Pembroke Ave 
Charlotte. NC 28027 
HIGHT. WILLIAM BLANNIE JR 

46 
HIGHTOWER. LAUREN ANNE 
225. 231 
4 St Lo Dr 
Ft Carson, CO 80913 
HIGINBOTHAM. JOHN P JR 
254 

411 Alabama Rd 
Towson. MD 21204 
HILL. ERIC WILLIAM 120. 138 
1880 Pmewood Dr 
Fairview. PA 16415 
HILL. MARIAN 172. 192. 254 
3017 Fox Run 
Des Moines. IA 50321 
HILLEARY. BRENT C 84. 120. 
121, 138. 276 
Rt 2 Box 47 
Spring City. TN 37381 
HILLS. KRISTIN JOAN 114, 115, 
221 

2160 Royall Dr 
Winston Salem. NC 27106 
HILLS. LAURA ANN 134. 175. 
192. 239 

5735 Stewart Ave 
Port Orange. FL 32019 
HILTON. SUSAN 190. 191. 239 
20 Isle ol Pines 
Hilton Head Isl. SC 29928 
HINSON. MINOR THURLOW 
137, 239. 281 
3701 Sharon Rd. 
Charlotte, NC 28211 
HINTON. VALERIE SUE 221. 
225 

5260 NE 15th Ave 
Ft Lauderdale. FL 33334 
HISSAM. THOMAS EDWARD 
124, 177. 195 
7928 Scolland Dr 
Chagrin Falls. OH 44022 
HOBSON. CARL PATRICK 
PO Box 1146 
Sanlord. NC 27330 
HOCKETT. ANNE BURTON 
6 Lake Manor Ct 
Baltimore. MC 21210 
HODGES. CATHERINE B 118, 
276 

20 Highland Rd. 
Westport. CT 06880 
HOGAN. LINDA COLLINS 242 
Box 656 

Keysville. VA 23947 
HOGAN. MORELAND H JR 46 
HOHMAN. SUZAN ALENE 112. 
221 

3510 Pebble Beach Dr. 
Dallas. TX 75234 
HOLBROOK. KERRY E 171 
221. 225 

4927 S Rocheblave St 
New Orleans, LA 70125 



HOLDEN. CHRISTOPHER H 137 
1586 Montpelier SI 

Petersburg. VA 23803 

124 
1360 Manage! Way 

Dunwoody. GA 30338 
HOLLAND. JOHN GILL 43. 46, 

52. 56 
HOLLEY. VIRGINIA LINDA 150 
182. 254 
1330 Buckingham Ave 

Norfolk. VA 23508 
HOLLINGSWORTH. MERRIS 

2710 Wyclifte Ave SW 

Roanoke. VA 24018 
HOLMAN, RODNEY GERALD 

20. 72. 77. 225. 227 

P O Box 12043 

Winston Salem, NC 27107 
HOLT. JOHN ANTHONY 8. 225 

PO Box 819 

Burlington. NC 27215 
HOLT. MARGARET BERRENA 

36. 37. 276. 294 

PO Box 819 

Burlington. NC 27215 
HOLT. ROSS ALLEN 225. 227 

295 

1008 Worth St. 

Asheboro. NC 27203 
HOLTON. ELIZABETH BROOKE 

33. 123. 276 

411 Holly Lane 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
HOMECOMING 148, 149 
HONEYCOTT, LUTHER 68 
HONOR COUNCIL 74. 75 
HOOKS. CHARLES ANDRIE 77. 

177 

319 Oak St 

Sandersville, GA 31082 
HOOPES. BARBARA JEAN 277 

1013 Woodside Dr 

Clearwater, FL 33516 
HOOPES. CAROL E 35. 148. 

254 

1013 Woodside Dr. 

Clearwater. FL 33516 
HOOTEN. JAMES 21044 
HYNDS. WALLACE STANTON 

37. 152. 198, 254. 279 

6532 Sandale Dr. 

Columbia. SC 29206 



IBRAHIM. GEORGE KAISSAR 

137 

5 Lakeview PI 

Smithfield. NC 27577 
ILES. DONNA JEAN 35, 277. 

294. 295 

2301 Fairmount Ave 

Lakeland, FL 33803 
ILES. ROBERT ALAN 75. 96. 

240 

2301 Fairmount 

Lakeland. FL 33803 
IMPARA. CAROL SUSAN 18 

141, 277, 295 

13001 Foxden Dr 

Rockville, MD 20850 
INTRAMURAL SPORTS 210 

211. 212. 213. 214. 215 
IORDANOU. MICHAEL 131. 184, 

185, 277, 281 

147-33 Barclay Ave 

Flushing. NY 11355 
IVERSON. BILL 85 
IVES. PATRICIA LOUISE 191 

221, 226 

1041 Arredondo St 

Lake City. FL 32055 
IVEY. FRANKLIN DELANO JR 

172. 173. 193. 240 

1115 Gregory Lane 

Slatesville. NC 28677 
IVEY. WILLIAM LENTZ JR. 240 

3462 Northshore 



Columbia. SC 29206 
IVY. DAVID DUNBAR 123. 124 
240 

601 Klein St 
Vicksburg. MS 39180 



JACKSON. ROBERT BRUCE 46 
JACKSON. WALTER HERBERT 

19. 47 
JAEGERS. KENNETH RAY JR 
226, 230 
515 Tlttany Lane 
Louisville, KY 40207 
JAMES, JOHN BAXTER JR 162 
184. 226 
16 Wehrh Rd 
Long Valley. NJ 07853 
JAMESON. ELIZABETH H 114 
132. 221, 226 
1733 Alderbrook Ct 
Atlanta. GA 30345 
JAMISON. GUSTAV CLARK 138 
162. 230. 226 
1243 Idlewood Rd 
Asheboro. NC 27203 
JANNETTA. PETER T 137. 177 
1269 Murry Hill 
Pittsburgh. PA 15217 
JAWORSKI. JOSEPH S 123 
124. 240. 284 
1 1 1 N Post Oak Lane 
Suite 100 

Houston. TX 77024 
JENKS. ROBERT ALLEN 
Rt 6 Box 393-c 
Lancaster. SC 29720 
JENNEY. SUZANNE P 83. 128. 
240 

1406 Forest Hill Dr 
Greensboro, NC 27410 
JENSEN, HANS PETER 124. 226 
Rt 3 

Shelbyville. TN 37160 
JERNIGAN. JOSEPH CLARK 43 
254 

Route 3 Box 598 
Dudley. NC 28333 
JOHNSON. DANIEL CLAYTON 
240 

Route 3 Box 278 
Concord. NC 28025 
JOHNSON. ELIZABETH AMES 
20. 221. 226 
2 Linda Lane 
Severna Park. MD 21146 
JOHNSON, FRANKLIN D. 931 
Leigh Ave. 

Charlotte. NC 28205 
JOHNSON. LAURA DAVIDSON 
240 

907 W Pearsall 
Dunn. NC 28334 
JOHNSON. MICHAEL NEIL 
5347 Greengate Dr 
Groveporl. OH 43125 
JOHNSON. ROBERT HARLE 
505 Hale Ave 
Morristown. TN 37814 
JOHNSON. THOMAS BILLY 77. 
177, 230 

8151 Waxwing Ave 
Jacksonville, FL 32219 
JOHNSTON, CHARLES LEIF 184 
3509 Hastings Dr. 
Richmond. VA 23225 
JOHNSTON. TIMOTHY D 72. 
120. 227. 255 
825 West Dean Rd 
Milwaukee. Wl 53217 
JOHNSTION. WILLIAM M 227 
55 Osner Dr 
Atlanta. GA 30342 
JOLLY. CAROLE LYNN 3. 118. 
240. 295 

1509 Scotland Ave 
Charlotte. NC 28207 
JONES. DEAN MOORE 137. 277 



3535 Darlir»,' 

Canton, OH ■■ 
JONF'. 

2475 Foxwood 

Chape) Hill. NC 2 
JONES. JAMES H 77 14 

277 

P O Box 36 

■nviiie. AL 35186 
B, MICHAEL ALLEN 77. 

177. 255 

Dovef Rd 

Preston. MD 21655 
JONES. WILLIAM PETER 255 

827 NE 154 Si 

Mi.irm (I 13162 

JONES. RENEE DENISE 77. 277 

717 West Sixth Ave 

Birmingham. AL 35204 
JONES. RICHARD 15. 64 
JONES. SIDNEY RIVERS III 226 

227 

Rt 1 Box 89 

Gasburg. VA 23857 
JORDAN. JEFFREY NEIL 

851 Linda Lane 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
JORDAN. LEVI ANTHONY 177 

1459 W 10th St 

Jacksonville. FL 32209 
JUENGST. DANIEL CHARLES 

226 

216 Stewart St 

Carrollton. G A 30117 
JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD 

PROGRAMS 38. 39 

K 

KA 126. 127 

KANE. JEFFREY MARK 137. 

177 

3919 Severn Ave 

Charlotte. NC 28210 
KANN. SUSAN BLAIR 114. 241 

1495 Montevallo 

Decatur. GA 30033 
KASH. GREGORY MASON 

2134 Gloucester Pi 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
KAUFMANN. JAMES GREGORY 

1 18. 255 

4210 BnarcliHe Rd 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
KAUFMANN. JOHN ERIC 118. 

255 

4210 BnarcliHe Rd 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
KAUFMANN. SUSAN GAIL 221. 

222. 226 

3716 Aull Park Ave 

Cincinnati. OH 45208 
KAYLOR. ROBERT DAVID 46. 

291 
KAZEE. THOMAS A 46. 74. 240 
KEAR. ROBERT JAMES 131 

103 Burke Ct 

Buchanan. NY 10511 
KEELEY. MICHAEL MURRAY 

165. 194. 195. 226 

Rt 3 Box 46 

Brevard. NC 28714 
KEEVER. GARLAND L 59 
KEHS. MICHAEL DAVID 102. 

124. 277. 295 

4039 Land O Lakes Dr 

Atlanta. GA 30342 
KEIF. LORELEI LYNN 114 148. 

221. 226. 228 

12677 Allport Rd 

Jacksonville. FL 32223 
KEITH. ANNE HARVEY 114. 225 

2601 SI 

Gastoma MC 28052 
KELLEY. BARBARA E 18. 148. 

277. 279. 294 

119 Erwm Rd. 

29550 
KELLEY MICHAEL SAWYER 21. 



Index /Advertisements 305 



THE COPELAND HOUSE 
GALLERY 




FINE PRINTS 

ART SUPPLIES 

CUSTOM 
FRAMING 



N. MAIN 

STREET, 

DAVIDSON 

892-3005 



80, 255 

1009 Churchwell Ave. 

Knoxville, TN 37917 
KELLEY, ELIZABETH ANNE 80, 

241 

728 Scotland Ave. 

Rockingham, NC 28379 
KELLY. MARY GENEVRA 152, 

277, 293 

728 Scotland Ave. 

Rockingham. NC 28379 
KELTON, JOHN ROBBINS 47 
KEMP, LOIS ANNE 46 
KEMPER, JAMES VARDAMAN 

226, 230 

2036 Soreline Tower 

Destin, FL 32541 
KENDRICK. WILL DAVIS 35, 

132, 255 

419 Lansdowne Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
KENNEBREW, ANDRE TYRONE 

77. 175, 177 

533 North Oakely Dr. 

Columbus, GA 31906 
KENNEDY, ROBERT EUGENE 48 
KERN, JULIE ANN 227, 231 

R.D. #3641 

Mohnton. PA 19540 
KERNES, RUTH 65 
KERR. JAMES KNOX III 137. 

277 

3949 Miruelo Cir. N. 

Jacksonville, FL 32217 
KERR, NATALIE CHRISTINE 255 

3421 Australian Ave. 

West Palm Beach, FL 33407 
KIDD, ROBIN C. 

P.O. Box 997 

Chiefland, FL 32626 
KIM. ESTER CHEERHYUM 72, 

75 

44 Huron Drive 

Chatam Township. NJ 07928 



KIMBIRL. MARGARET P. 114, 

221, 227 

Route 4 

702 Underwood Drive 

Lagrange, GA 30240 
KIMMEL, CHARITY ALLAN 

P.O. Box 488 

Davidson, NC 28036 
KIMMEL. CHRISTOPHER 

DONALD 238 

P.O. Box 488 

Davidson. NC 28036 
KIMMEL. DONALD L. 47 
KIMSEY, TODD GRANT 124, 

157, 206. 241 

220 Moss Side Drive 

Athens. GA 30606 
KING, HOP MADELINE 118, 255 

2521 Turnstone 

Wilmington. DE 19805 
KING. LUNSFORD 

RICHARDSON 47 
KING. NANCY DIANE 255 

4230 George Lane 

West Palm Beach, FL 33406 
KING. REBECCA FRANCES 241 

101 Wood Lily Lane 

Spartanburg. SC 29302 
KING. RUSSELL M. Ill 145 

4709 North 33rd St. 

Arlington, VA 22207 
KING, STEPHEN CURTIS 241 

1865 Queens Way 

Chamblee, GA 30341 
KING. STUART ARTHUR M. 

227, 248 

2521 Turnstone Dr. 

Wilmington, DE 19805 
KING. OFFICER WAYNE 62 
KING, WILLIAM WALTER 137 

210 Wilson Pt. 

New Bern, NC 28560 
KINNETT. JOSEPHINE B. 80. 85, 

221. 227 



Join Mary and Murry for lunch or 
just a snack at . . . 




Home of the famous "BIG ORANGE. 

Serving delicious sandwiches, 

soups, shakes, specials, etc. 

Monday through Saturday 'til 3:30 pm 

Main Street, Davidson 



3131 Cathryn Drive 

Columbus. GA 31906 
KINSEY. JAMES JOSEPH 137. 

177 

109 W. Washington St. 

La Grange. NC 28551 
KIRK, KEVIN THOMAS 131 

5105 Clear Run Dr. 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
KIRKPATRICK, WILLIAM W. 

226. 227 

Rt. 1 Box 15 

Zirconia, NC 28790 
KISS, ELIZABETH ESTHER 93, 

145, 294 

6624 Skyline Ct. 

Alexandria, VA 22307 
KISTLER. DONALD 60 
KISTLER. JEFFREY GREY 123, 

255 

2008 Beverly Road 

Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
KLAHN, LISA ANN 

39 Blackbriar Drive 

Colts Neck, NJ 07722 
KLEIN. BENJAMIN G. 48 
KLEIN. ROBERT OWEN 255 

1430 Jackson Ave. 

Apartment 1 1 

New Orleans. LA 70130 
KLINGER. STANFORD N. 177, 

195. 241 

1653 Anita Place 

Atlanta, GA 30306 
KMIECIK, ROBERT JOSEPH 227 

3541 Interlachen Rd. 

Augusta, GA 30907 
KNOBLOCh. ELEANOR LOUISE 

191, 241 

2575 Arden Rd NW 

Atlanta. GA 30327 
KNOBLOCH. EMMY JEAN 114, 

190. 191. 278. 294, 295 

2575 Arden Rd. NW 



Atlanta, GA 30327 
KNOX. BRYANT WHITFIELD 

132. 227. 230 

54 Knollwood Dr. 

Watchung. NJ 07060 
KNUDSON. JEFFREY RUSSELL 

120, 138 

841 Shenandoah Road 

Lexington, VA 24450 
KOOKEN, KATHRYN DREIER 

114, 241 

624 Friar Tuck Toad 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
KORD, SUSANNE 128. 264, 267 

Ernst 101 Apt 406 W 

3550 Marburg /Lahn 

West Germany 
KREESE, JOHN 168 
KRENTZ, PETER M 48 
KRIEG, KENNETH JOSEPH 132, 

255, 294, 295 

57 North Street 

Logan. OH 43138 
KROTCHKO. JOHN FLOYD 117. 

247, 255 

218 Madison 

Linden, NJ 07036 
KUCERA. GREGORY LOUIS 34. 

35, 128, 278. 284. 291 

4860 Ellen Ave. 

Pfafflown, NC 27040 
KURTTS, TERRY ALAN 74, 137. 

241 

3105/F18 Dauphin St. 

Mobile. AL 36606 
KYLE. CONNIE LOUISE 114, 

115, 255 

10085 Paradise Blvd. 
Treasure Island. FL 33706 



LABBAN, GEORGE J R 48 



306 Index/Advertisements 



LACKEY. NANCY LYNN 255 

Rt 1 Box 182 

Hoke OR 

Dallas. NC 28034 
I ACKEY. WARREN RICHARD 

12. 137. 255 

228 Edgedale L> 

High Point. NC 27262 
LACY. ELIZABETH LAURA 278 

43 Wakelee Ave 

Stratford. CT 06497 
LADUE. PAUL WARREN 226. 

227 

8519 Salisbury Ct 

Springfield. VA 22151 
LAMBERT. ROBERT TODD 131. 

184. 185. 281 

Rl 6 Box 156 

Flemington. NJ 08822 
LAMMERS. KATRINA JEAN 

P O Box 607 

Davidson. NC 28036 
LAMMERS. WILLIAM TUTHILL 

21 
LAMOTTE. MARGARET ROSE 

2575 Davis Blvd 

Sarasota. FL 33577 
LAMPLEY. CHARLES G IV 126. 

219. 227. 231 

P.O Box 1807 

Shelby. NC 28150 
LANGLEY. JOSEPH JEREMIAH 

70. 72. 227 

123 Kennedy Circle 

Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
LANO. ELIZABETH ANN 221. 

227 

1025 Dundee 

Casper. WY 82601 
LARUS. JANIE PRESTON 

Rt 2 Box 399A 

River Rd 

Richmond. VA 23233 
LASLEY. RALPH A 117. 278. 

295 

1602 Chapel Hill Dr 

Alexandria. VA 22304 
LASNER. LANCE ALAN 124 

410 Greenwood Dr 

Greensburg. PA 15601 
LAUGHLIN. ELIZABETH H 114. 

162. 227. 231 

1080 Braeburn Dr 

Baton Rouge. LA 70815 
LAUGHLIN. JOHN CHAPPELL 

227 

1000 Baldwin. Rd. 

Richmond. VA 23229 
LAW. TIMOTHY HARDEN 

Box 1194 

St. Simons Island. GA 35122 
LAWING. WILLIAM DAVID 19. 

48 
LAWLER. LISA GAIL 135. 235. 

255. 278 

C/O F.J Lawler 

2117 Mt Hope Lane 

Toms River. NJ 08753 
LAWRENCE. STEVEN J 120. 

138. 180. 256 

1313 Bloommgdale. Dr 

Cary. NC 27511 
LAWRY. JON ARTHUR 117. 

146. 256. 257 

RT 6 Isle of Pines 

Mooresville. NC 28115 
LAZENBY. ALLEN 127. 189 

1206 Morris Ave 

Opehka. AL 36801 
LEAVITT. CAROLYN RENEE 

162. 221. 227 

9491 SW 97th St 

Miami. FL 33176 
LEAZER. JOHNNIE LEE JR 122. 

123. 124. 146. 278 

RT 2 Box 562 

Huntersville. NC 28078 
LEE. DAVID ALEXANDER 128. 

241 

5104 Newcastle Rd 



Raleigh. NC 27606 
l I I rjfni K WIltlAM 131. 177 

256 

• ■ Ave 

W.iyne. NJ 07470 

ICK 123. 124. 241 

1205 Condor Dr 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
l I t WAi If R EDWARD III 128 

P O Box 737 

Waycross. GA 31501 
I FEPER. ANDREW J 

430 Conn Ave 

St Cloud. FL 32769 
LEGERTON. CLARENCE W 127. 

278. 282. 294 

32 Council SI 

Charleston. SC 29401 
LEGERTON. DR CLARENCE W 

282. 283 
LEGERTON. MARY PRINGLE 

134. 241 

32 Council St 

Charleston. SC 29401 
LEINER. JOHN GROUT 101. 

228. 230 

3900 Terry PI 

Alexanderia. VA 22304 
LEMAN, JOSEPH TRENT 123 

7540 NW 6th Ct 

Plantation. FL 3317 
LENNON. YATES ALTON 228. 

230 

RT 1 Box 449 

Bladenboro. NC 28320 
LEONARD. THOMAS BUTLIN 

122. 123. 206 
1725 Windsor Blvd. 
Homewood. AL 35209 

LESHER. MELINDA KAY 49. 294 

LESTER. MALCOLM 49 

LETT. EARL DWANYE 177, 241 

RT 6 Copeland Rd 

Powell. TN 37849 
LETTON. ROBERT WARREN JR 

177 

RT 1 Box 344B 

Mt Sterling, KY 40353 
LEWIS. CYNTHIA 19. 44. 49. 52. 

293 
LEWIS. KENNETH BAKER JR 

123, 124. 252. 256 
6911 Kenleigh Rd 
Baltimore. MD 21212 

LEWIS. STEPHEN JEFFERY 128. 

256 

2400 Onandaga Dr 

Columbus. OH 43221 
LIFFORD. CHARLES E JR. 177. 

256 

RT 1 Tooles Bend Rd. 

Knoxville, TN 37919 
LIGO. LARRY F. 36. 37. 47 
LIM. SOON KENG 

Box 4048 

Penang 

Davidson. NC 28036 
LINCOLN. DAVID MARSTON 

120. 177. 242 

107 Garfield Rd 

W Hartford. CT 06107 
LIND. SHERRI KAY 134. 242 

805 Pheasant Run 

West Chester. PA 19380 
LINDSEY. DANIEL PAYNE 193. 

228, 248 

5519 Bunky Way 

Dunwoody. GA 30338 
LINDSEY. ELIZABETH D 9. 272. 

278. 286 

139 Brighton RD N E 

Atlanta. GA 30309 
LINDSEY. GLENN CARLOS 49 
LINDSLEY. JANET E 95. 128. 

242 

10 Woodhull Rd. 

E Setauket. NY 11733 
LITTLE. GEOFFREY OWEN 

1219 Peachtree BTL Ave 

Atlanta. GA 30327 



LLOYD. CHALRES 53. 105 
LOCKWOOD. MICHAEL OWEN 

132 184. 256 
42nd Ave 

Vero Beach. FL 32960 
LOFOUIST. ANNET WHITE 162. 

221. 228 

4263 Narvarez Way S 

St Petersburg. FL 33712 
LOGAN. BRET BRYON 150. 256 

109 Ambassador Dr 

Rochester. NY 14610 
LOGAN. LYNN KELLY 102. 221. 

256 

2203 Wildwood Rd 

Salem. VA 24153 
LOGGINS. PAUL 95 
LONG. PATRICIA E 74. 134. 

165. 1 196. 278. 293 

5318 Olympia Fields 

Houston. TX 77069 
LONG. RODERICK RUFUS 93. 

123. 124. 206. 281 

6431 Woodville Dr 

Falls Church. VA 22044 
LONG. ZACHARY F JR 64. 270 
LONGMIRE. MICHAEL LOUIS 

132. 177 

P.O. Box 1061 

Black Mountain. NC 28711 
LOPER. ROBERT BENTON 227 

1300 Denson Dr 

Opelika. Al 36801 
LOPTSON. CAROL JEAN 

6 Blackfoot Rd 

Trenton. NJ 08638 
LORENZEN. TIMOTHY ROBERT 

136. 137. 206. 278 
320 Santiago Dr 
Winter Park. FL 32789 

LOVE. REBECCA JEAN 278 

617 Carolina Ave 

Gastonia. NC 28052 
LOVETT. CHARLES CANDLER 

3. 116. 117. 159. 242 

1943 Robinhood Rd. 

Winston Salem. 27104 
LOWE. BRYAN G 177. 256. 260 

2000 Capitol Landing 

Williamsburg. VA 23185 
LOWREY, WILSON HUGH 12. 

230 

2170 Greensward Dr 

Atlanta. GA 30345 
LUFKIN. MICHAEL LEO 184. 

228. 230 

2874 Weathersfirld 

Clearwater, FL 33519 
LUSK, ELIZABETH LEE 228. 

231 

3113 Northampton Dr. 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
LUSK. JOHN ALEXANDER IV 

117 

3113 Northampton Dr. 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
LUTZ, ADELYN BROWN 1 18, 

191, 242 

821 Hawthorne Rd 

Shelby. NC 28150 
LUXTON. DONALD K 204 
LYDAN. JOHN BREVARD 43, 

137. 242 

2232 Sherwood Ave 

Charlotte. NC 28027 
LYERLY. WALKER IV 131. 137 

1905 Ninth St NW 

Hickory. NC 28601 
LYNCH. ROY 63 

M 

MCALISTER. KIMBERLY ANN 

134. 252 

3625 Wmdbluft Drive 

Matthews. NC 28105 
MCAULEY. WAYNE 68 
MCCAIN. BRENDA 65 
MCCALL. BRADLEY TODD 137 

435 Scotts Way 



•' 

802 Ou 

' 7024 
MCCALLIE. WILLIAM 
84. 278. 294 
16 Shallowford Rd 
Chattanooga. TN 37404 
MCCAMY. MARY STUART 93 
3215 Glen Arden Dr 
• i GA 30305 
MCCARLEY. LEE RANKIN 227 
202 Wmdmere Drrve 
Chattanooga. TN 37411 
MCARN. MARGARET HUNTER 
134 

501 Wilkinson Dr 
Laurmburg. NC 28352 
MCCLINTOCK. LYNN 162. 280 
1813 Oak Park Dr N 
Clearwater. FL 33516 
MCCOLL. JOHN SPRATT 137. 
226 

600 Coiviile Rd 
Charlotte. NC 28207 
MCCONNELL. THOMAS 
JOSEPH 

658 Dunster Street 
Pittsburg. PA 15226 
MCCORMACK. ELIZABETH H 
123 

7372 Clifton Rd. 
Clifton, VA 22024 
MCCORMICK. ANGUS LEE 71. 
95. 128 

305 W Blue Street 
St Pauls. NC 28384 
MCCORMICK. JOHN GORDON 

83. 256 
450 Wayne Avenue 

Indialantic. FL 32903 
MCCORMICK. ROBERT E 226. 
229 

305 West Blue Street 
St Pauls. NC 28384 
MCCULLEN. BOBBY K JR 194. 
195. 226. 229 
1109 Huntsmoor Dr 
Gastonia. NC 28052 
MCCURRY. DAVID 218. 243 
35 Sulphur Springs 
Asheville. NC 28806 
MCDARIS. KEVIN K 117 
1602 Mountambrook 
Huntsville. AL 35801 
MCDONALD. GARY LOWELL 
137 

9725 Brown Rd 
Jonesboro. GA 30236 
MCDONALD. JOHN LEE 128 
126 S Van Buren St 
Rockville. MD 20850 
MCDONALD. KARI KIRSTEN 23. 
256. 295 
Rt 5 Maple Drive 
Laurmburg. NC 28352 
MCDONALD. LAURA ELLEN 
162. 221. 229 
300 Heath Street 
Enterprise. AL 36330 
MCDONALD. MOFFATT G 179. 
280. 294. 295 
139 Rutledge Rd 
Greenwood. SC 29646 
MCDOWELL. JOHN ADAMS JR 
256 

46 High Street 
East Wilhston. NY 11596 
MCEWEN. JEFFREY DANIEL 
229 

34 1 1 Providence Rd 
Charlotte. NC 282 11 
MCFAYDEN. GREGORY ALFRED 
272 

Route 1 

Ellerbe NC 28338 
MCFAYDEN. WILLIAM C 74. 
?56 
3508 N. Edgewater Dr. 



307 



Fayetteville, NC 28303 
MCGAUGHEY, TIMOTHY JOHN 

226, 229 

1624 Tamarack Trail 
Decatur, GA 30033 
MCGEE. DAVID HUGHES 226, 

229 

1861 Runnymede Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
MCGEE, HERMAN 68 
MCGEE, VIRGINIA COBB 172 

2617 Briarcliff PI. 

Charlotte, NC 28207 
MCGINNIS. CYNTHIA LYNN 

505 Talleyrand Ave. 

Monroe, NC 28110 
MCGUIRT. JOHN K. 132, 226, 

230 

Bx. 100 Friendship Rd. 

Camden, SC 29020 
MCGUIRT. WILLIAM F. JR. 230 

901 Goodwood Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27106 
MCINTOSH, RUBEN 68 
MCINTYRE. MARGARET JEAN 

209 

River Road 

Lyme, NH 03768 
MCJUNKIN, JOHN HOUSTON 

256 

624 Dogwood Road 

Statesville. NC 28677 
MCKEAN, THOMAS ARTHUR 
127, 177, 243, 260 
1937 Coulee Ave. 

Jacksonville, FL 32210 
MCKEITHEN. DAN SETH 230 

315 Woodland Drive 

Newport News, VA 23606 
MCKEITHEN, MELISSA KAY 72, 

122, 123, 256, 270 

315 Woodland Drive 

Newport News, VA 23606 
MCKELWAY, ALEXANDER 

JEFFREY 49 
MCLAIN, JAMES 176, 177. 280 

Route 1 Box 167 

Clio, SC 29525 
MCLEAN, IAN ALEXANDER 230 

1103 W. Main St. 

Crawfordsville, IN 47933 
MCLEAN, JAMES DICKSON IV 

137, 177 

Route 8 Box 25 

Lumberton, NC 28358 
MCLELLAND, JAMES G. JR. 

177. 256 

Route 8 Box 188 

Statesville, NC 28677 
MCMANIS, MELISSA ANN 80, 

117, 243 

117 Woodcreek Rd. 

Bedford. VA 24523 
MCMANUS. RANDY D. 172, 

173, 193, 281 

43 Cuyuga St. 

Auburn, NY 13021 
MCMICHAEL, PETER C. 243 

Route 2 Box 398 

Reidsville. NC 27320 
MCMILLAN, ANN HUNTER 44, 

49 
MCMILLAN. CATHERINE L. 

3135 Clarendon Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
MCMILLAN, ELIZABETH H. 134, 

256, 295 

3801 Bonwood Drive 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
MCMULLEN. JOSEPH DANIEL 

177, 206, 227, 230 

1221 Gracewood 

Hendersonville, NC 28739 
MCPHAIL, ELIZABETH LEE 191, 

196, 258 

3106 Roundhill Rd. 

Greensboro, NC 27408 
MCREE, WILLIAM ANDREW 177 

1408 Hunting Ridge 

Raleigh, NC 27609 



MCSWAIN, JEFFREY YATES 

127, 167, 177, 243 

43 Berkeley Rd. 

Avondale Estates, GA 30002 
MACBETH, ALEXANDER PAUL 
132, 230 

2264 Trescott 

Tallahassee. FL 32312 
MACCONNACHIE. JOANNE 278 

P.O. Box 2065 

Anderson, SC 29622 
MACCORMACK, MAYOR 

NANCY 105 
MACK, BARRON BAYLES JR. 

72, 120, 139, 278 
122 Confederate St. 

Fort Mill, SC 29715 
MACK, FRANCES ELIZABETH 

114, 242 

122 Confederate St. 

Fort Mill, SC 29715 
MACMILLAN, STEPHEN PAUL 

Box 323-r 

Stockton, NJ 08559 
MACWILLIAM, STEWART B. 

117, 243 

Rt. 1 Box 45 

Tryon, NC 28782 
MACZKA. MARY E. 12, 221, 

230, 235 

13014 Woodthorpe 

Houston, TX 77079 
MAGRUDER, JAMES F. 184 

105 Creek Rd. E. 

Greenwood, SC 29646 
MAINELLA, PAUL JOSEPH 35, 

95 

P.O. Box 1589 

Davidson, NC 28036 
MALONE, JOHN GREEN 172, 

193, 230 

637 Windsor PI. 

Concord, NC 28025 
MALONE. JOHN HODGE 

143 Tuxedo Dr. 

Thomasville, GA 31792 
MALONE, MARY A. 134 

637 Windsor PI. N.E. 

Concord, NC 28025 
MALONEY, SAMUEL DOW 22, 

49. 52 
MANGELSDORF, CAROLYN E. 

84, 96. 118, 278 

835 7th St. 

Oakmont, PA 15139 
MANN, JEFFREY STEPHEN 14. 

93, 124, 243 

1656 Dunwoody Sq. 

Dunwoody, GA 30338 
MANN, JOHN WALTER III 137, 

230, 256 

1416 High Acre Rd. 

Beford, VA 24523 
MANNING, ROBERT JOHN 49. 

142 
MARCUS, DAVID E. 101, 232 

2155 Hallmark Dr. 

Pensacola, FL 32503 
MARKHAM. CURTIS REID 132 

849 Hemingway Court 

Stone Mountain, GA 30088 
MARKS, JOHN HUMPHREY III 

227 

4206 Windsor 

Dallas, TX 75205 
MARSH, PAIGE ANN 175. 221 

230 

2806 West Lane 

Houston, TX 77027 
MARSHALL, LUCY LUNN 74 

118, 160, 256, 295 

402 Oak Forest Ave. 

Baltimore, MD 21228 
MARSHALL, STEVEN ROBERT 

184, 230 

15135 N.W. Perimeter 

Beaverton, OR 97006 
MARSHBURN, CHRISTOPHER 

S. 

717 Monmouth Way 



Winter Park. FL 32/92 
MARSHBURN, THOMAS H. 172, 
278 

2520 Henderson Mill 
Atlanta, GA 30345 
MARTIN, HAROLD L. JR. 39 
528 W. Parkway 
High Point. NC 27262 
MARTIN, KEITH ANTHONY 177 
Jackson Ave. 
Gray, GA 31032 
MARTIN, LEROY BROWN III 
124, 243 

5015 Glenwood Ave. 
Raleigh, NC 27612 
MARTIN, MARY VINCENT H 
134, 135, 175 
5903 Jenness Court 
Louisville, KY 40222 
MARTIN, MIKE 143 
MARTIN, STERLING 172, 193, 

204, 240 
MARTIN, THOMAS ALLEN 137, 
278 

14214 Appletree 
Houston. TX 77079 
MASHBURN, JAMES W. JR. 
180, 243 
601 Pinetree Dr. 
Decatur, GA 33030 
MASON, ELIZABETH DAVIES 
243 

260 Chamounix Rd. 
St. Davids, PA 19087 
MASON, LEON 76, 77, 103, 
177, 243 

1 12 Academy Ave. 
Sanford, FL 32757 
MASON, MICHAEL DEAN 128, 
226, 256 

168 Lake Forrest Ln. 
Atlanta, GA 30342 
MASSEY, CAROLINE CYNTHIA 
35, 123 

5700 Lansing Dr. 
Charlotte, NC 28211 
MATTHEWS, COY RANDOLPH 
117, 243 

715 E. Kingston Ave. 
Charlotte, NC 28203 
MATTHIS. DON 230 
Rt. 2 Box 177 
Clinton, NC 28328 
MAUZE, MARY MARGARET 
114, 184, 221, 230 
3509 Dorothy Lane S. 
Fort Worth. TX 76107 
MAUZE, MICHAEL LAURENCE 
137, 184. 230 
7 Blackburn Place 
Summit, NJ 07901 
MAXWELL. BLAIR ADAMS 35, 
132 

Rt. 3 Box 381 
Oswego, NY 13126 
MAY, JERRY WILLARD 177, 
226, 230 
505 Linton Rd. 
Sandersville, GA 31082 
MAYDOLE, ROBERT E. 50 
MAYES, DEE 171, 174, 175 
MEADOR, ANN GRAHAM 95, 
230, 231 
22 Robin Hill Rd. 
Nashville. TN 37205 
MEDLIN. PAULA RIDGELY 134, 
258 

1056 Kenleigh Cir. 
Winston Salem, NC 27106 
MEETZE, GROVER C. JR. 64. 

270, 277 
MELE. ALFRED 23. 51 
MELL, MICHAEL 142, 182, 227, 
230 

27 Log Cabin 
St. Louis, MO 63124 
MELTON. CATHERINE ANN 
P.O. Box 345 
Davidson, NC 28036 
MELTON. JULIUS W JR. 64 



MARY CAMBRIA MELTON 120 
160, 243 
822 Concord Rd. 
Davidson. NC 28036 
MERIWETHER, GEORGE C. 172 
230 

1400 Devonshire Dr. 
Columbia. SC 29204 
MERRELL. MATTHEW BOYD 
137, 159, 243 
416 Blair Rd. 
Vienna, VA 22180 
METZEL, DANIEL PHIPPS 243 
1707 Stuart Ave. 
Petersburg, VA 23803 
METZGAR DEBRA ANN 74, 84 
281 

424 Ivy Crest Terrace 
Dayton, OH 45492 
MEYER, GERALD JOSEPH 230 
13915 SW 73rd Ave. 
Miami, FL 33158 
MIANO, ANNE MARY 114, 221 
228 

3233 Landerwood Dr. 
Charlotte, NC 28210 
MIDWINTERS 150, 151 
MILES, WILLIAM ANDERSON 
132 

P.O. Box 41 

Locust Valley. Ny 11560 
MILLER. ANDREA E.R. 120 243 
1020 Eden Dr. 
Nennah, Wl 54956 
MILLER, PATRICIA D. 178, 186 

191, 204 
MILLER. ROBERT JOSPEH 131 
177 

45 S. Main St. 
Middleville. NY 13406 
MILLER, STEPHEN JOSEPH 
Route 1 

Lawndale, NC 28090 
MILLER, TOM 205 
MILLS, LESLIE LYNN 257. 258 
294 

153 Heritage PI. 
Mooresville, NC 28115 
MITCHELL. ANN IMAGILL 134 
243 

212 King St. 
MT. Pleasant, SC 29464 
MITCHELL, HENRY A. Ill 26, 
230 

3341 White Oak Rd. 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
MOBLEY, HERBERT W. JR. 127, 
281 

Rt. 1 Box 81 
Waynesboro, GA 30830 
MOFFETT, STEPHANIE H. 118, 
162, 243 

209 W. College St. 
Oberlin. OH 44074 
MOHORN, HAROLD WAYNE JR. 
132, 281 

5505 Westfield Dr. 
Greensboro, NC 27410 
MOLINARE, RODERICK A. JR. 
227, 230 
3789 Kirkless 
Winston Salem, NC 27104 
MONROE, HUNTER KELLY 120, 
138, 294 
404 Lyons Rd. 
Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
MOODY. SARAH 123. 162. 258 
6404 Kennedy Dr. 
Chevy Chase. MD 20015 
MOORE, ALVA STEVENSON 
114, 162. 163. 230 
Rt. 3 Box Hs-60 
Farmville. VA 23901 
MOORE, STAFF SERGEANT 

DANIEL 59 
MOORE. HANNAH TIRRILL 218 
221, 230 

312 Buncombe St. 
Raleigh, NC 27609 
MOORE. JAMES GOMEZ 93 



308 index/Advertisements 




Stores In 

MORGANTON. LINCOLNTON, SHELBY, 

DALLAS, NEWTON, MAIDEN. STANLEY, 

KINGS MOUNTAIN, DAVIDSON. MARION 

Come by, 
We would like to meet you. 

DAVIDSON — 892-7211 — SADLER SQUARE 



Index /Advertisements 309 



Rt. 1 Box 207 
Troutman, NC 28166 
MOORE, ROBERTSON LAFAR 
137 

1048 Arbor Rd. 
Winston Salem, NC 27104 
MOORE, SUSAN RICHARDSON 
134. 230, 280 
3112 St. Regis Rd. 
Greensboro, NC 27408 
MOORE, SUZANNE MARIE 221 
118 MT. Vernon Ave. 
Danville, VA 24541 
MOORE, THOMAS DUDLEY 132 
22 Edgebrook Lane 
Monsey, NY 10952 
MOORE. THOMAS KELLY 138, 
243, 258 
719 W. Pine St. 
Johnson City, TN 37601 
MORELL, CATHERINE ANN 123, 
171. 174, 175, 258 
12 Apple Tree Close 
Chappaqua NY 10514 
MORENO, SOFIA 264, 267 
Calle Humera 16 
Madrid 23 
Spain 
MORGAN, ANNE WILLIS 102, 
221, 230 
1502 Rainier Falls 
Atlanta, GA 30329 
MORGAN. JAMES HANLY III 95, 
123, 124, 243 
535 13th Ave. 
Huntington, WV 25701 
MOROSAN. M. VLADIMIR 50, 

163 
MORRIS, JANET MARY 74. 114, 
221, 231 
1 1 N. Crossway 
Old Greenwich, CT 06870 
MORRIS. MATTHEW C.E. 
5920 Saddleridge Rd 
Roanoke, VA 24018 



MORRISETT, JULIA LYNN 221, 

231 

1261 Watauga St. 

Kingsport, TN 37660 
MORRISON, WILLIAM HARVEY 

2, 12 

Rt. 9 Rolling Hill Dr. 

Monroe, NC 28110 
MORROW, VIRGINIA GAYLE 

281, 295 

P.O. Box 407 

Umatilla, FL 32784 
MOSCA. ROBERT SALVATORE 

206, 230 

8 Lincoln Rd. 

Bethpage, NY 11714 
MULLIS, ROBERT BRADLEY 87, 

118, 226. 258 

3500 Woodmere Place 

Winston Salem, NC 27106 
MUMY. SARAH ELLEN 71. 282 

421 Kyle Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
MUNGER, KATHY LEE 35, 123, 

282 

P.O. Box 4 

Gotha, FL 32734 
MUNSON, JOHN MERRELL 230, 

231 

415 Rightmyer Dr. 

Roanoke Rapids, NC 27870 
MURPHY. GREGORY FRANCIS 

126, 172, 231, 294 

3005 Downs Court 

Raleigh, NC 27612 
MURPHY, MICHAIL D. 124 

P.O. Box 321 

Hollis, NY 11412 
MURRAH. KENNETH F. JR. 137 

1601 Legion Dr. 

Winter Park, FL 32789 
MURRAY, KATHRYN RUTH 80. 

118. 258 

4308 Exeter Close 

Atlanta, GA 30327 



MURRELL, GEORGE LEE 138, 

139 

314 Hearthstone Rd. 

Columbia, SC 29210 
MURREY, MARSHALL CARY 24, 

37, 150, 210, 258 

RR. 6 

Pulaski, Tn 38478 
MUSICK, ALICE A. 117, 160, 

282, 295 

c/o Carl Musick 

8710 Donna Gail Dr. 

Austin, TX 78758 
MUSKOFF, JOHN PAUL 282 

2344 Brixton Rd. 

Columbus. OH 43221 
MYERS. FRANK EBERT JR. 282 

4223 Sylvia St. 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
MYERS. SCOT WOODWARD 

137 

27 Perdicaris PI. 

Trenton, NJ 08618 
MYERS. SUSAN LOVE 148, 221, 

228 

N 

NAPPER, CLAY HUGHES 230, 

231 

2571 Club Park Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
NASH, BRIAN WAYNE 120, 142. 

295 

Route 6 Box 666 

Monroe, NC 28110 
NASH, LINDA CAROL 

2831 44th St. NW 

Washington, DC 20007 
NEAL, DOYLE 68 
NEALE, VICTORIA ANNE 114, 

243 

P.O. Box 249 

Rutherford Col, NC 28671 



NEISLER, DAVID CARL 79 

403 Neisler Drive 

Kings Mountain, NC 28086 
NELSON. CHARLES A. 15 

718 Tara Trail 

Columbia, SC 29210 
NELSON, C. LOUISE 50, 52 
NELSON, MARTHA LENOIR 17, 

95, 107, 112, 114, 115, 221, 

231, 248, 252 

2901 Carolina Ave. 

Roanoke, VA 24014 
NELSON, RANDY F. 15, 51, 269 
NESTER, ALBERT DWAYNE 

118, 119, 146, 286, 291, 295 

2912 Hillcrest Drive 

Scottsboro, AL 35768 
NEWSOME, JAMES DANIEL 

136, 137. 258 

329 Durand Falls Dr. 

Decatur, GA 30030 
NICHOLLS, PETER 65 
NICHOLS. CHARLES KNERR 78. 

132. 184, 282 

4015 Webb Road 

Chattanooga, TN 37416 
NICHOLAS, ROBERT TATE 177 

1150 Rankin St. C/6 

Stone Mountain, GA 30083 
NICHOLASES, MELIS 7, 130, 

217, 258 

6 Gennadios Street 

Limassol 

Limassol Cyprus -0 -0730 
NIELSEN, JEFFREY WINTHER 

132 

8460 Philrose Dr. W. 

Jacksonville, FL 32217 
NIEPOLD, JOHN ROBERT 132, 

152 

1230 Galleion Dr. 

Naples, FL 33940 
900 ROOM 145, 146, 147, 160 
NOAKES, WENDY BURNETT 

4295 Barnett Shoals 




FINE WINES AND (^ORE - 

FOODS FOR YOUR HEALTH 
WAIN STREET WViPioN 



HAM & EGGS 




After the 900 Room closes, join 

your friends at HAM & EGGS for an "early morning' 

breakfast. 

Hwy. 77, Cornelius Exit. 
Open 24 Hours. 



310 Index/ Advertisements 



231 
1119 Providence Rd 
Charlotte. NC 28207 

Athens, Ga 30605 
NOBIF. MICHAFl B 132. 206. 

282 

Route 4 Box 37 

Winchester. VA 22601 
NOCK, SARAH BRITTINGHAM 

37. 258 

P O Box 296 

Onancock. VA 23417 
NORMAN. JOHN JOSEPH JR 

137. 243 

3204 Mountain Rd 

Haymarket. VA 22069 
NORTHCOTT. ELEANOR 65. 

291 
NORTHRUP. CURTIS WHITNEY 

127. 282 

16 Maryland Rd. 

Maplewood. NJ 07040 
NORTHRUP. JAMES IRVIN 

P O Box 1066 

Davidson. NC 28036 
NORWOOD. CHRISTOPHER R 

282. 295 

457 Pine Tree Dr 

Orange. CT 06477 
NORWOOD. JONATHAN HAYES 

123. 124. 258 

457 Pine Tree Dr 

Orange. CT 06477 
NOTO. LAURIE MARIE 39 

54 Macon Ave 

Asheville. NC 28801 
NOTTINGHAM. MARK ALAN 

127. 188. 189. 243 

USA District Engineer 

Camp Zama Japan 

San Francisco, CA 96343 
NUNN. CARIE K. 137, 172. 209. 

282 

115 South East Ave. 

Kannapolis. NC 28081 
NUTT. WILLIAM RODGER 50 

O 

OBRIANT. JENNIFER LYNNE 43. 

134. 243 

198 Dearing St 

Athens. GA 30605 
ODDO. THOMAS CHARLES 

194. 195 

1175 Bassett Road 

WEstlake. OH 44145 
ODELL. JOHN BROWNING 11, 

123. 124. 125. 258 

108 Villa Road 

Newport News. VA 23601 
ODOM. DIANE KAY 282. 294 

5282 Vernon Lake Dr 

Dunwoody. GA 30338 
OGLUKIAN. TANYA MERCEDES 

221. 231 

600 Shore Road 

North Palm Beach. FL 33408 
OKEL. THOMAS WESTCOTT 

131 

147 Mt Vernon Dr 

Decatur. GA 30030 
OLDENBURG. MARK DOUGLAS 

72. 132. 162. 163. 259 

2337 Whilden Court 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
OLDHAM. BENJAMIN TURNER 

1 13. 259 

331 N Maysville St 
Mt. Sterling, KY 40353 

OLDS. DIETRICK MASON 

194 Pondview Drive 

Springfield. MA 01118 
ONCE IN A LIFETIME 156. 157 
OPPENHIMER. WILLIAM M. JR. 

102 Libbie Avenue 

Richmond. VA 23226 
ORDING. SANDRA LYNN 282 

332 Stratford Rd 



Wilkesboro. NC 28697 
ORR. ERIN ELIZABETH 

7703 Glendale Rd 

Chevy Chase. MD 20015 
ORTMAYER. LOUIS L 15. 50 
OSBORNE. DAVID 206. 266 
OSTERHAUT. DR SUYDAM 88 

OTTO. SCOTT ROBERT 83 

243 

2820 Cravey Drive 

Atlanta. GA 30345 
OUTTEN. SAMUEL WRIGHT 137 

10 Sevier Street 

Greenville. SC 29605 
OVFRBFY. WARREN M 128 

282. 294. 295 

1532 Agawela Ave 

Knoxville. TN 37919 
OVERBY. LEROY MARVIN 71 

79. 87. 128. 141. 226. 259, 

270 

P.O Box 5134 

Falmouth. VA 22401 
OVERCASH. GINA ROCHELLE 

1 18. 243 

209 West 19th St 

Kannapolis, NC 28081 



PACK. ANTHONY WADE 231 

6209 Parkfield Lane 

Clemmons, NC 27012 
PACKARD. ALICE JEAN 162 

400 Moore Hgts 

Dubuque. I A 52001 
PAFFORD. THOMAS DAVID 93 

41 1 Lower Terrace 

Huntington. WV 25705 
PAGE. BARRY RICHARD JR 39 

1004 Sunset Drive 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
PAGE. MELISSA ANNE 192. 

221. 231. 236. 238. 288 

1004 Sunset Drive 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
PALASAK. JOSEPH JOHN JR 

177 

4246 Cardinal Blvd 

Daytona Beach, FL 32019 
PALMER. EDWARD L 43. 50 
PALMER. FRANCES S. 95. 243 

610 Brandon Street 

Stevesville, NC 28677 
PAPADEAS, ELLEN MICHELE 

72. 114. 231 

416 Oakland Drive 

Burlington. NC 27215 
PARK. JOSEPH K 231. 231 

9622 Derrik 

Houston. TX 77080 
PARK. LELAND MADISON 65 
PARKER. EDITH ANN 141. 282 

Route 1 Box 9 A 

Clinton, NC 28328 
PARKER. EMIL 205 
PARKER. JOHN ROBERT 226. 

231 

2514 North Seminary 

Chicago. IL 60614 
PARKER. MARIE ANN 9. 282. 

294 

1427 Raeford Rd 

Fayetteville. NC 28305 
PARTAIN. GIA MICHELE 134. 

282. 295 

641 Carriage Way NW 

Atlanta. GA 30327 
PARTIN, MALCOLM 

OVERSTREET 24. 44. 51 
PATTEN. ROBERT CHESTER 

Route 1 Box 531 

Troutville. VA 24175 
PATTERSON COURT. 112. 113. 

114 
PATTERSON. SARAH LOUISE 

114. 172. 191. 219. 221. 231 

928 Seville Place 

Orlando. FL 32804 
PATTERSON. WILLIAM B 80. 



259 

University ol the South 

Sewanee. Tn 37375 
PAUL. FIFNA MARIE 114 217 

221. 231 

420 NW 32nd Street 

Gainesville. FL 32607 
PAYMFR. WAYNF DAVID 131. 

176. 177. 282 

3780 NW 78th Lane 

Coral Springs. FL 33065 
PAX 128. 129 
PEACOCK, MELISSA S 172, 

282. 295 

4806 St Francis Ave 

Columbus. GA 31904 
PEARCE. MARGOT 182 

171 Bryn Mawr Drive 

Lake Worth. FL 33460 
PEEBLES. RAY STOKES 74. 

210. 245. 282. 294 

Route 4 

Concord. TN 37720 
PEEK. RICHARD MAURICE JR 

160. 259 

1621 Biltmore Drive 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
PEEPLES. JOHN COLQUITT 

184. 227 

2442 Meadowbrook Dr. 

Valdosta, GA 31601 
PERKINS. EDWARD BRADLEY 

120. 243 

6605 Burlington. Rd 

Whitselt. NC 27377 
PERRY. JOHN WILLIAM 227 

Dakota Street 

Spindale, NC 28160 
PERRY. LAURA ELLEN 

2400 Oakengate Lane 

Midlothian. VA 23113 
PETERS. DEBORAH SUE 112, 

259 

Route 1 Box 597 

Newport. NC 28570 
PETREA. KATHY LYNN 259 

P.O. Box 555 

Kannapolis. NC 28081 
PETROU, LAURA 

525 Deepwood Drive 

Henderson. NC 27536 
PFEFFERKORN. KARL J. 118. 

259. 295 

2100 Royall Drive 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
PHI DELTA THETA 130. 131 
PHILLIPS. LUCY EUGENIA 122. 

123. 162. 283 

2243 Sagamore His Dr 

Decatur. GA 30033 
PHILLIPS. MARK BRYAN 39. 

117. 295 

4901 Spring Lane 

Charlotte. NC 28213 
PIERCE. LESLIE TODD 167. 230 

2158 T.H. Varnell Dr. 

Tunnel Hil. GA 30755 
PIERCY. GIFFORD LIONEL 

Rt. 1 Box 69 

Union Level. VA 23973 
PIKE 132. 133 
PITSER. WILLIAM GREG 167. 

227 

621 Nokomis Court 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
PITTARD. RUTH W. 66 
PITTMAN. MAJOR WILLIAM R. 

59 
PLAUT. DANIEL SACHS 138. 

226. 231 

Rt. 2 Box 3 13- A 

Marshall. NC 28753 
POE. GEORGE W 50 
POLK, DEAN LEE 231 

1121 Miller Street 
Winston Salem. NC 27103 
POLLEY, MAX EUGENE 23. 43. 

51 
PONDER. JOHN EDWARD 231 
6322 Kalani Place 
Dallas. TX 75240 



/,■ ■ , 
POOl i 

231 

Box 517 

Bethel. ME 04217 
POPE, i .177 

502 Northampton Rd 

Fayetteville. NC 28303 
POR' 

114. 213. 223. 231 

4700 Riverview Blvd 

Bradenton, FL 33529 
POSEY. LYNMARIE A 244. 294 

944 Wayne Ave 

Wyomissing. PA 19610 
POTTENGER. SUSAN PLATT 

259 

39 Rustic Drive 

Cohasset. MA 02025 
POTTER. ALBERT J JR 29 

138 

1006 Shamrock Road 

Asheboro. NC 27203 
POTTSDAMER. VINITA D 252 

784 Lynhurst Dr SW 

Atlanta. GA 30311 
POWELL. JULIE SUZANNE 35 

8713 Kenilworth Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27612 
POWELL, LYNN ALISON 1 18 

148. 244 

2816 Fair Oaks Road 

Decatur. GA 30033 
PRETTYMAN. SUSAN BETH 244 

10825 Vista Road 

Columbia. ND 21044 
PRICE. CHARLES W. 132. 177. 

184. 281 

1127 Stiltord Ave 

Plamlield. NJ 07060 
PRICE. GENERAL WILLIAM 28. 

PRICE. WILLIAM D 28. 131 

5542 Phelps Luck Dr 

Columbia. MD 21045 
PRITCHARD. CARLETON 66 
PROCTOR. J. HARRIS 53 
PROFFIT. DAVID STEPHEN 

1008 Biltmore Ave 

Lynchburg, VA 24502 
PURCELL, WILLIAM R. II 137. 

283. 294 

1301 Dunbar Drive 

Laurinburg. NC 28352 
PUTNAM. JEREMIAH LEE 21. 

52 



Q 

QUIPS AND CRANKS 94. 95 



RADER. LINDSEY ANN 244 

1613 Eton Way 

Crofton. ND 21114 
RALEGH! 157. 159 
RANSOM. DONYA JAYNE 283. 

295 

326 Exeter Rd 

Devon. PA 19333 
RANSOM. EARL STACY JR 

167. 295 

P.O. Box 308 

Pembroke. NC 28372 
RANSON. FORREST LEONARD 

132. 226. 232 

2307 Overhill Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
RAST. WILLIAM FORT 

P.O Box 38 

Pelion. SC 29123 
RATCHFORD. JOSEPH T JR 

127. 189 

8804 Fircresl 

Alexandria. VA 22308 
RATLIFF. CHARLES EDWARD 



Index /Advertisements 311 



JR 52 295 
RATTERREE, JASPER C. Ill 244 

624 Gentry Place 

Charlotte. NC 28210 
RAWLINS, KEITH LAMAR 177, 

232 

6204 Crestview Lane 

Forest Park, GA 30050 
RAY, PAUL CHASTAIN 123, 

124, 184 

2154 Greensward Dr. 

Atlanta, GA 30345 
RAYNAL. REVEREND CHARLES 

293 
RAYNAL, VERONIQUE 264, 265, 

267 

94 Rue De Ala Corifr 

34000 Montpillier 

REARDON, STEPHEN WILTON 

132, 295 

3312 Shaftsbury St. 

Durham. NC 27704 
REASONER, CHRISTOPHER 283 

3000 Estero Blvd. 

Ft. Myers Beach, FL 3391 
REAVES. JAMES BROWN 72. 

138, 227, 232 

1405 Montego St. 

Titusville, FL 32780 
REDD, JANE ALYSON 118, 244 

3428/32f Milan Ln 

Lexington, KY 40502 
REDD, JUDITH VIRGINIA 231, 

232 

3740 N.E 27 Terr. 

Lighthouse Point. FL 33064 
REDDICK, MARY GREY 191, 

221, 228, 232 

182 Lakeland Dr. 

Conway, SC 29526 
REDDING, JOAN LUCILE 162, 

283, 294. 295 

708 W: Church St. 

Elizabeth City, NC 27909 
REDDING, SCOTT JOHN 127. 

166, 167 

212 Ridgecrest Rd. 

Asheboro, NC 27203 
REED, PHOEBE CURLIN 245 

3419 Ridgewood Rd. 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
REED, STANLEY B. JR. 283 

Rt. 2 Box 134 A 

Purcellville, Va 22132 
REES. JOHN B. Ill 118, 172, 283 

295 Tanglewood Dr. 

Athens, GA 30606 
REESE, JAMES DUEY 95, 128, 

259 

P.O. Box 502 

Bainbridge. GA 31717 
REICH, IVAN JAC 177, 226, 232 

9201 N.W. 33rd Place 

Sunrise. FL 33321 
REICHS. KATHLEEN J. 53 
REID. DAVID 60 
REITZ, DANIEL RICHTER 177 

5804 Country Club Dr. 

Myrtle Beach. SC 29577 
RELPH, ROBERT G. 205 
RESMIK, DAVID BENJAMIN 92, 

230. 232 

Rt 1 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
REVELL, KEITH DOUGLAS 132 

16141 Aberdeen Way 

Miami Lakes. FL 33014 
REW, PAMELA SCOTT 259 

208 Blvd. 

Mountain Lakes. NJ 07046 
RHODES, DANIEL DURHAM 52 
RHODES. WILLIAM GREGORY 

230. 232 

Rt. 6 Box 610 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
RHOTON, WILSON P. Ill 

512 Dutchman Ave. 

Mt. Holly, NC 28120 
RIBADENEYRA, ELIZABETH T. 



80, 259, 288 

1164 Wyndegate Dr. 

Orange Park, FL 32073 
RICE, CRAIG HOPKINS 35, 43. 

118, 180, 180, 283 

1010 Lane Ave. 

Titusville, FL 32780 
RICE, JORGIA CELESTE 245 

1599 Tryon Rd. 

Atlanta, GA 30319 
RICE, MOLLY DICKERSON 283 

10644 Rondo Ave. 

Baton Rouge, LA 70815 
RICH, CATHERINE GRACE 245 

Box 83 

Emory, VA 24327 
RICHARDS. JOHN 93 
RICHARDS. RICHARD EVANS 

43, 245 

Rt. 1 Box 1684 

Davidson, NC 28036 
RIDER, WENDY ANNE 96, 283 

352 Bayberrie Dr. 

Stamford, CT 06902 
RIDING CLUB 209 
RIFLE TEAM 180. 181 
RINGER. HOWARD E. 226 

89-07 210 Place 

Queens Village. NY 11428 
RIOPEL, DAVID JAMES 123, 

125, 165, 260 

Rt 1, Box 24 

Earlysville, VA 22936 
RIST, CARL FREDERICK 127, 

167, 245 

18014 S.W. 83rd Ct. 

Miami. Fl 33157 
RITCHIE, TIMOTHY SCOTT 

2914 Avon Rd. 

Louisville, KY 40220 
ROARK, MARY DAWN 

1311 Woodland Ave. 

Johnson City, TN 37601 
ROBBINS, BUDDY 60 
ROBBINS, JOHN WILLIAM JR. 

118, 259 

2713 Amherst Rd. 

Rocky Mount, NC 27801 
ROBERTS, CHRISTOPHER T. 

184, 185 

1466 Myron St. 

Schenectady, NY 12309 
ROBERTS, JERRY ALLAN 53 
ROBERTS, JOSEPH EARL JR. 

118, 119, 259 

Rt. 1 Box 457-a 

Pembroke, NC 28372 
ROBERTS. MARY S. 32, 78, 

141, 283 

9 Greystone Rd. 

Asheville. NC 28804 
ROBERTS. PAUL C. 

9 Greystone Rd. 

Asheville, NC 28804 
ROBERTSON, HUGH B. 283 

613 W. Union St. 

Morganton, NC 28655 
ROBERTSON, JOHN H. JR. 132, 

285 

234 Riveredge Dr. 

Leola, PA 17520 
ROBERTSON. PRESTON T. 230, 

232 

2304 Lackawanna St. 

Adelphi, MD 20783 
ROBINSON, CHARLES W. Ill 

245 

239 Millwood Dr. 

San Antonio, TX 78216 
ROBINSON, DANIEL CLAY 

Rt. 1 

Lebanon, NJ 08833 
ROBINSON, ELIZABETH R. 36. 

37, 134, 221, 248, 259 

3301 Stanwyck Court 

Charlotte, NC 280 211 
ROBINSON, GABRIELLA M. 246 

15 Ghana Dr. 

Greenville, SC 29605 
ROBINSON, JOHN SHEPARD 



137, 188, 189, 226, 232 
ROBINSON, JOHN SHEPARD 
137, 188, 189, 226, 232 
3301 Stanwyck Ct. 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
ROBINSON, JOYCE HENRI 37, 
157, 259 

349 Putnam Ranch Rd. 

W. Palm Beach, FL 33405 
ROBINSON, SALLIE SMITH 221, 

232 

3017 St. Helena Dr. 

Tucker, GA 30084 
ROBINSON, SHERRY E. 259 

230 Robyal Tower Dr. 

Irmo, SC 29063 
ROBINSON, WILLIAM R. Ill 79, 

259 

4242 Gardenspring Dr. 

Clemmons, NC 27012 
ROCHE, CAROL LEIGH 74, 95, 

152, 221. 259 

1706 Greystone 

Dublin, GA 31021 
ROCK, ANDREW PETER 131, 

177 

1209 Roxboro Rd. 

Longwood, FL 32750 
RODDEY, JOHN G. JR. 137, 

230, 232, 294 

2920 Wickersham Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
RODDEY, OLIVER HUNTER 132, 

184, 226, 232 

2124 Sherwood Ave. 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
ROGERS, JAMES WOODS 172, 

173, 226, 232 

Rt 1 210 Solar Way 

Denton, TX 76201 
ROGERS, MALCOLM M. 127, 

259 

P.O. Box 767 

Easley, SC 29640 
ROGERS, MARVIN L. 285 

109 Mountain View Dr. 

Easley SC 29640 
ROGERSON, THOMAS A. 53 
ROGICH, LYNNE MARGOT 246 

8024 Washington Rd. 

Alexandria, VA 22308 
ROLLER, E. GARDNER 66 
ROLLINS, AARON B. 285 

Rt. 10 Box 46 

Gainesville, FL 32601 
ROLLINS. ANNE BRADLEY 72, 

80, 114, 115, 217, 246 

5 Goodale Circle 

New Brunswick, NJ 08901 
ROSIER. ALAN KELVIN 77, 177, 

246 

Rt. 1 Box 124 

Sopchoppy, FL 32358 
ROSS. CLARK G. 24, 53, 55 
ROSS, SARA ELIZABETH 123, 

217, 246 

4284 49th Ave. S. 

St. Petersburg, FL 33711 
ROSS, SUE FIELDS 66 
ROSSELOT, NANCY C. 95, 231, 

232 

2792 Overlook Dr. N.E. 

Atlanta, GA 30345 
ROTH. THOMAS MOSSER III 

120, 158, 259 

106 Bon Air Rd 

Elkin, NC 28621 
ROURK, CAROLINE DAVIS 134, 

259 

808 Wells St. 

Durham, NC 27707 
ROWAN, BRIAN ANTHONY 259 

2109 Richmond Rd. 

Toledo. OH 43607 
ROWE. DAVID FRANKLIN JR. 

259. 285 

6861 Rollingwood Rd. 

Clemmons. NC 27012 
ROWE, DAVID MATTHEW 124 

210. 295 



1 1 Springwood Dr. 

Asheville. NC 28805 
ROWE, DAVID W. 53 
ROWE, ELLEN WINSTON 114, 

135, 259 

232 Walnut 

Nashville, TN 37205 
ROYSTER, HENRY PAGE JR. 

3800 Stratford Rd. 

Richmond. VA 23225 
ROZZELLE, JAMES E. JR. 117 

Rt. 14, Box 512/A 

Charlotte, NC 28208 
RUDY, SAYRE STEVEN 

35 Innes Rd. 

Scarsdale. NY 10583 
RUGBY FOOTBALL TEAM 206. 

207 
RUMLEY, CAROLINE E. 95, 171, 

221, 232, 246 

1703 Forest Hills Dr. 

Holiday, FL 33590 
RUMLEY, JAMES DEWEY III 

1703 Forest Hills 

Holiday, FL 33590 
RUPPENTHAL, JOHN ROBERT 

246 

2501 Knollwood Rd. 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
RUSK 134, 135 
RUTH. ROBERT D. 53 
RYAN. DANIEL EAMES 227, 

232 

774 Armada Terr. 

San Diego, CA 92106 



SACHTJEN, BRIAN TODD 231, 
232 

1 The High Road 
Bronxville. NY 10708 
SAE 136, 137 
SAILING TEAM 182, 183 
SANNER, ERIC MONROE 19, 
132, 182, 259 
30 Ren Roy Dr. 
Lavale, MO 21502 
SAPPENFIELD. DANIEL MARK 
127, 231, 260 
2720 Bennington Rd. 
Fayetteville, NC 28303 
SASSER, JAMES A. Ill 35, 131. 
285 

Rt. 2 Box 196 
Titusville, FL 32780 
SATTERWHITE. WM. M. Ill 127, 
246 

621 Glen Echo Trail 
Winston Salem, NC 27106 
SAVAGE, CLIFFORD SCOTT 94, 
95. 120. 260 
American Embassy 
Box 360 

APO New York, NY 09080 
SAWHNEY, DEEPAK 120, 246 
501 Church St. 
Belmont, NC 28012 
SAYANI, MAHMOUD PYARALI 
294 

P.O. Box 56111 
Nairobi 
Kenya 
SCHEMBER, THOMAS MICHAEL 
95. 226. 260 
416 Fairmount Ave. 
Jersey City, NJ 07306 
SCHENK. GARY SCOTT 109. 
115, 138, 179, 246 
28 Echo Ridge Rd. 
Upper Saddle Riv. NJ 07458 
SCHILLING, THOMAS F. 124, 
227 

506 Wooklawn Ave. 
Beckley. WV 25801 
SCHIPKE, TIM 162. 232 
909 Colonel Anderson 
Parkway 
Louisville, KY 40222 



312 Index /Advertisements 




HOLT Hosiery MILLS 

I N C R P O R A T E I) 



Margaret, 

Thanks for everything — 
for making this such a great 
year. 

Love, 
Tony 




Index /Advertisements 313 



SCHREMMER, MICHAEL A. 124, 

132, 186, 285 

125 Penn View Dr. 

Monroeville, PA 15146 
SCHRETTER, DEBORAH LEA 

128. 160, 246 

140 Lullwater Rd. 

Athens, GA 30606 
SCHUH, MERLYN D. 53 
SCHULZ, PAUL WILLIAM 124, 

124, 285 

2920 E. Lk. Hartridge Dr. 

Winter Haven, FL 33880 
SCHUMER, RONALD EDWARD 

177, 246 

22 Dana Ave. 

Savannah, GA 31406 
SCOTT, ANDERSON BUTLER 

17, 93, 124, 172, 246, 252 

1704 Hillwood Dr. 

Montgomery, AL 36106 
SCOTT. CAROLINA MAYER 260 

1328 Queens Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28207 
SCOTT. CAROLYN ELIZABETH 

39 

Box 29 Hwy 153 

Hixson. TN 37343 
SCOTT, ELIZABETH C. 285 

7102 Club Vista Ln. 

Richmond, VA 23229 
SCOTT, KIMBERLEE 

P.O. Box 1093 

Davidson, NC 28036 
SCRAGG. CAROLINE EELLS 

134, 175, 246 

10243 Gaywood 

Dallas, TX 75229 
SEEHORN, JONI LEIGH 825 

2897 Chattanooga Rd. 

Rocky Face, GA 30740 
SEEL, CHRISTINE MARIE 172 

Presby Medical CTR. 

Jeonju, Korea 0970 
SEEL. WILLIAM PATRICK 132. 

246, 295 

632 Dunraven Dr. 

Winter Park, FL 32792 
SELLERS, RANDOLPH P. 127, 

198. 285 

827 Knollwood Dr. 

Hendersonville, NC 28739 
SHACKLEFORD, ROBERT 123 
SHAFFER, MARY MARGARET 

221. 232, 247 

101 Rebel Ridge Dr. 

Lexington, VA 24450 
SHARP, SALLY 11, 285 

2348 Dellwood Dr. NW 

Atlanta, GA 30305 
SHAW, JAMES BARRON JR. 

162, 193, 232 

5138 Vernon Oaks Dr. 

Dunwoody, GA 30338 
SHAW, JOHN M. 116, 141, 193, 

285, 294, 295 
SHAW, KEITH DARRELL 177. 

227 

Am Embassy FPO 

San Francisco, CA 96699 
SHEFFIELD. MARK BRADLEY 

43, 78, 260 

108 Elmwood Terr. 

Greensboro, NC 27408 
SHELBY, STEVEN TATE 127, 

285 

7106 Pawtuckett 

Charlotte, NC 28208 
SHI, DAVID E. 24, 55, 81, 109, 

165 
SHIELD, STEPHEN WYATT 35. 

132. 198. 260 

30 Ferguson Lane 

Newport News, VA 23606 
SHOEMAKER. DAVID 123. 124 

M O Q 2224 

Camp Lejeune, NC 28542 
SHORT. CHARLES DAVID 30, 

206, 227. 233 

2220 Parham Dr. 



Wilmington, NC 28403 
SHORT, MITZI 77, 118, 170, 

171, 175. 221, 260 

1841 Bryden Rd. 

Columbus, OH 43205 
SHREVE, WILLIAM E. JR. 127. 

246 

305 Auburn Dr. 

Alexander City. AL 35010 
SHULMAN, CAROLYN ANN 

114, 221, 233 

1721 SW 69 Ave. 

Plantation, FL 3317 
SHY, LESLIE EVE 150, 261 

704 Shady Lawn Rd. 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
SILVER, JOHN ROBERT 74, 

127, 246 

5924 Martin Lake Rd. 

Charlotte, NC 28212 
SIMAN, JOHN CARL 92, 93, 96, 

285. 294 

4132 Bridgewood Ln. 

Charlotte, NC 28211 
SIMPSON. DAVID ANDREW 261 

671 Burrage Rd. 

Concord. NC 28025 
SIMPSON, JOSEPH B. IV 117. 

261, 277 

2230 Westminster PI 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
SIMPSON. MURRYA STEPHEN 

226 

Rt. 9 Box 26 

Monroe. NC 28110 
SIMS. GARY ALLEN JR. 131, 

177, 285 

82 Donna Dale Ave. 

Concord, NC 28025 
SINCLAIR. RAY CHARLES 3, 

77, 165, 176, 177, 285, 294, 

295 

1367 Milnor St. 

Jacksonville, FL 32206 
SINGER, WILLIAM RIPLEY 123, 

245 

Box 95 

Lumpkin. GA 31815 
SINGLETON. JOHN ROBINSON 

261, 295 

128 Eudora St. 

Denver. CO 80220 
SINGLETON, LAURA GAIE 134, 

255, 261 

225 Lebanon Ave. 

Morgantown, WV 26505 
SINGLETON, ROBBY 99, 104, 

142, 148 
SISCO, LANCE THAYER 131. 

177, 193, 251, 269. 285 

15715 Almondwood Dr. 

Tampa, FL 33612 
SISK, DAVID WARNER 226, 233 

810 Edgewater Tr NW 

Atlanta, GA 30328 
SITTON. JULIA LEIGH 79, 246 

727 W. Union St. 

Morganton, NC 28655 
SKELTON, STEPHEN WILLIAM 

128. 246 

7310 Filbert Lane 

Tampa, FL 33617 
SKILLERN. JOEL RALPH 159. 

206. 226, 233 

2392 Fawn Ridge 

Stone Mountain, GA 30087 
SLADCIK. GARY FRANK 117, 

224 

702 Palm Dr. 

Glenwood, IL 60425 
SLAGLE. CHARLES D. 184, 

185. 193. 204, 205 
SLATER. JOHN W. 66 
SLOAN. DAVID BRYAN III 120. 

138. 246 

1925 Hillsboro RD. 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
SLOAN, EARNEST 65 
SLOAN. LISAAANN 35. 118, 

285 



Quarters 8 

Naval Air Station 

Pensacola, FL 32508 
SLOOP. GREGORY TODD 120, 

172, 246 

612 N. Poplar Ave. 

Kannapolis, NC 28081 
SLOOP, JOSEPH CONRAD 261 

Rt. 1 Box 418 

Kannapolis, NC 28081 
SMILEY, ELIZABETH BAKER 93. 

95. 118. 246 

3728 Clouldland. Dr. 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
SMITH, ALEXANDER PARKER 

35, 131 

606 Brookwood Lane 

Goldsboro, NC 27530 
SMITH. ANTHONY WILLIAM 286 

2914 Brookmere 

Charlottesville. VA 22901 
SMITH. CATHERINE M. 74, 134, 

191. 213, 221, 261 

2728 Spencer St. 

Durham, NC 27705 
SMITH, CLARENCE E. 54 
SMITH, CLYDE LANFORD 9, 

172, 193, 227, 233 
355 Chelsea Circle 
Atlanta, GA 30307 

SMITH, COLIN SHAW 8, 12, 67. 

141, 145 
SMITH, DWIGHT LLOYD 286 

4606 Emmacyn Dr. 

Summerfield, NC 28208 
SMITH, ELIZABETH JAYNE 175, 

246 

2917 Henneberry Rd. 

Pompey, NY 13138 
SMITH, EDWIN AGAN 137, 262 

P.O. Box 10 

Statesboro, GA 30458 
SMITH. JOHN BREM 118. 172, 

173, 193, 240, 262 
421 Fieldstone Rd. 
Mooresville, NC 28115 

SMITH, LAUREN BOWER 114, 

218, 221. 233 

Howard Avenue 

Tarboro, NC 27886 
SMITH, MICHAEL JOSEPH 131. 

146. 152, 167 

1610 Dale Circle S. 

Dunedin, FL 33528 
SMITH, MYRTLE DENISE 

3465 Springside Dr. 

Decatur, GA 30032 
SMITH. NORWOOD MARYE 37. 

141. 148, 261 

1804 Chickasaw Dr. 

Columbus, MS 39701 
SMITH, SCOTT GORDON 106. 

127, 194, 195, 200, 286 
1600 Crescent Ridge 
Daytona Beach, FL 32018 

SMITH. SUZANN HELEN 262 

Rt 1 Box 360-D 

Willow Springs. NC 27592 
SNEAD. PARKS HOLMANIII 150. 

286, 294 

Rt. 2 Box 23 

Amherst, VA 24521 
SNIPES, RUSSELL G. JR. 29. 

128 

660 Holland Rd. 

Fuquay Varina, NC 27526 
SNYDER. DAVID VERNON 16, 

222 

Rt. 9 Box 228/G 

Winston Salem, NC 27107 
SOCCER TEAM 184. 185 
SODERSTROM. CHERYL JEAN 

128. 152. 246 
Stony Brook School 
Stony Brook. NY 11790 

SOFLEY. CARL WILSON JR. 

118. 119. 286, 295 

1237 Kinston Rdg. Rd. 

Cary, NC 27511 
SOMMER, SAMUEL A. Ill 127, 



162 

Rt 5 Box 106 

Selma, AL 36701 
SOPER, LAUREN CLAIRE 

5501 Sutton PI. 

New Orleans, LA 70114 
SORACCO. JEAN LESLIE 99. 

141. 296 

2160 High Point Trail SW 

Atlanta, GA 30331 
SORENSEN, KEVEN ERIC 286, 

295 

201 Camelford Rd. 

McMurrary, PA 15317 
SORUM, MARY LANEIR 221 

398 Broadway 

New Orleans, LA 70118 
SOUD, STEPHEN EUGENE 93. 

198 

840 Randolph Dr. 

Aberdeen, MD 21001 
SOWERBY, JAMES BAXTER 227 

1111 Sunset Dr. 

Greensboro. NC 27408 
SPACH. ROBERT CLENDENIN 

246 

444 Anita Dr. 

Winston Salem, NC 27104 
SPANGLER, JOHN GIVEN 80, 

140, 286. 294, 295 

3811 Henderson Rd. 

Greensboro, NC 27410 
SPANNUTH, HOLLY ANN 128 

27 Waverly 

Clarendon Hills, IL 60514 
SPAUGH. ROBERT GORDON 

95, 137, 246 

1015 Wellington Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27106 
SPE 138, 139 
SPEAKERS 88, 89 
SPEED. SARAH FRANCES 114. 

231. 233 

587 Heyward Cir. 

Marietta, GA 30064 
SPENCER, CHERIE LOU 231. 

233 

4261 Allistair Rd. 

Winston Salem NC 27014 
SPENCER. GEOFFREY DAVID 

286 

206 Wild Turkey Trl. 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
SPENCER. JENNIFER ANN 128, 

246 

206 Wild Turkey Trl. 

Chapel Hill, NC 27514 
SPENCER, SAMUEL REID JR. 

48, 66. 67, 103, 218, 291. 

293 
SPRING FROLICS 152. 153 
STACKHOUSE. LEE ANN 84. 

286. 293 

1000 Westwood Ave. 

High Point. NC 27262 
STAFFORD, SHAWN DELANEY 

137, 177. 227. 262 

601 E Carolina Ave 

Crewe, VA 23930 
STANBACK, JOHN WILLIAM 

132 

626 Club House Dr. 

Salisbury, NC 28144 
STANBACK, MARK THOMAS 

132. 246 

626 Club House Dr. 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
STANFILL. JOHN DAVID 227 

630 Stanford 

Bartow, FL 33830 
STARNES, WILLIAM BARRY 262 

P.O Box 4111 

Davidson. NDNC 28036 
STAUFFER. JULIE RENEE 221 

4415 Old Fox Trail 

Midlothian, VA 23113 
STEADMAN. PAMELA JEAN 80. 

231 

74 Portland Rd. 

Summit. NJ 0791 



314 Index/Advertisements 



STEANS. JFNNll I M Wl I L S 22 1 

Ml I | A 

BanncKktHim. II 60015 
STEWINS. ROLAND ARTHUR 

233 

19 Cambridge Ave NE 

1 1 W.iiion Beach. FL 32548 
STI INI R MARt I DMUNI 

227 

704 I akevtew Ave 

Millonl. Dl 19963 
STELL. LANCI k 55, 180 

•itNSON. ROBERT J 67 
STERGHOS. STRATTON N JR 

131. 262 
1775 SE 9th St 

1 1 I .tinier dale. FL 33316 
STFVFNS. AGNES CORRINE 

134. 135. 286 

Rt 3 Box 607 

Dudley. NC 28333 
STEVENSON. CHARLES J 

743 Sprtngdale Rd E 

Statesvtlle. NC 28677 
STEVENSON. KATHLEEN 26. 68 
STIIL. CHUCK 141 
STINE. STEPHEN F 132. 198. 

206. 227. 263 

1729 Christmas Dr 

Momstown. TN 37814 
STIPP. JOHN JOSEPH 36. 37. 

132. 263 

4301 Carmel Rd 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
STOCKTON. JAMES HILL 25. 

72. 127. 245. 286 

2844 Fairmont Rd 

Winston Salem. NC 27106 
STOKES. KATHRYN ARMECIA 

134. 263 

3621 Pmetop Rd 

Greensboro. NC 27410 
STOKES. SAMUEL LANCE 118. 

195. 263 

3200 Country Club Dr 

Charlotte. NC 28205 
STONE. ELAIN CAMILLE 77. 

231. 233 

29 i 1th Ave SW 

Birmingham. AL 35211 
STONE. JOHNNY M II 84. 85. 

263 

Rt 5 Box 284 

Santord. NC 27330 
STOREY. JOHN PARKER 196 

P.O. Box 796 

Barlow. FL 33830 
STOSUR. DAVID ALLEN 132. 

172. 193. 227. 263. 294. 295 

10457 Dorchester Ave 

Westchester. IL 60153 
STOTLER. ELLIOTT C 32. 260. 

286 

339 Tynebridge 

Houston. TX 77024 
STOUDT. NANCY LYNN 134. 

175. 263 

2705 Hazelwood 

Ft. Wayne. IN 46805 
STOVALL. JANET MARIE 2. 76. 

77. 233 

901 Leggett Rd 

Rocky Mount. NC 27801 
STRADER. PAMELA LYNN 231. 

244 

208 Overbrook 

Lexington. NC 27292 
STRADER. RICHARD HAYNES 

9. 132. 295 

208 Overbrook 

Lexington. NC 27292 
STRAWSER. TERESA LEE 263 

Route 4 Box 275 

Vale. NC 28168 
STRICKLAND. GEORGE T. Ill 

218. 240. 247 

5610 Old Chester Rd 

Bethesda. MC 20014 
STROUD. CYNTHIA LEE 272. 

286 



ii. NC 28036 
STROUD. JUNIUS BRUTUS 43. 

',4 

STROUD. W RANDALL 94. 95. 

106. 247. 252 

10537 Betnhorn 

Houston IX 77024 
STROUD. WIUIAM R JR 123. 

i 14, 137 

415 Drummond Dr 

Raleigh. NC 27609 
STRYKER. JOANNE CAROL 

221. 233 

203 Falling Tree Ln Monore. 
NC 28110 

STUTTS. SUSAN GRACE 120, 

247 

Route 1 Box 450 

Hickory. NC 28601 
STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

ASSOCIATION 72. 73 
SUKDIAL. AJAY S 264, 265 

A/ 113 Defense Coloin 

Mawana Rd Meerut 

India 
SULLIVAN. GARRETT A JR 

172. 173. 240 

5526 Five Knolls Dr 

Matthews. NC 28105 
SULLIVAN. WILLIAM HENRY 31. 

132, 226. 233 

3822 Roberts Lane 

Arlington. VA 22207 
SUMMERELL. WILLIAM RUSS 

10 

5937 Ponderosa Drive 

Raleigh. NC 27612 
SUMMERS. CHARLES A 66 
SUNDBERG. KELLY KAY 28. 

231. 233. 294 

2001 Greenbrier 

Charlottesville. VA 22901 
SURRATT. MARGARET V 16. 

72. 95. 114, 221. 233 

848 Roslyn Rd. 

Winston Salem. NC 27104 
SUTTON. HOMER BATES 54 
SWANSON. MARK WILLIAM 

231. 233 

127 Duke Dr 

Lake Worth. FL 33460 
SWEARENGIN, DENNIS ROY 

118. 247 

607 Carolina Avenue 

Statesville, NC 28677 
SWIFT, WILLIAM BISHOP 124. 

227. 233 

118 Golfview Dr 

Franklin. NC 28734 
SWIMMING TEAM 186. 187 
SWINDALL, CHARLES PERRY 

177. 286 

Route 2 Box 22 

Ashville. AL 35953 
SWISHERS. JAMES G. 54 
SWOFFORD. CHRISTOPHER T. 

93. 131. 286 

204 Buchan St 

North Wilkesboro. NC 28659 
SYME. JOHN STENNIS 226. 233 

6 Donington Dr. 

Greenville. SC 29615 
SYPULT. JAMES C 205 



TABB, MARY WELDON 114. 

247, 294 

3042 Pine Needle Rd. 

Augusta. GA 30909 
TABB. STEWART MASON 111. 

150. 262 

2450 Hollmgsworth Hill 

Lakeland. FL 33803 
TAFT. LAURA ELIZABETH 221. 

233 

254 Colville. NC 28207 
TANKERSLEY. THOMAS C 



2231 Woodley Rd 

Montoomw) 
rANTII i I I, Mil hai i Bl AIR 

185 13 l 

Rocky Riv«-r 
TAPP. RICHARD LINDSAY 132. 

247 

Ht i Box 93 

) NC 27243 
I All HOBFRT GREAYE JR 

123. 124 

500 River Bend Rd 
Ingham ai 

I AVI l . EDWARD MARION JR 

230. 233 

901 Trowman Lane 

Ml Pleasant. SC 29464 
1AYI Of. BfNJAMIN OGLE VI 

1222 Bolton St 

Baltimore. MD 21217 
TAYLOR. BURT FOWLER III 72, 

137, 236. 249 

3955 S Pmebrook Dr 

Mobile. AL 36608 
TAYLOR. DAVID AITCHESON 

4001 Belle Rive Terr 

Alexandria. VA 22309 
TAYLOR. RALPH LELAND 120, 

121, 138. 286 

2730 Duke Gloucester 

East Point, GA 30344 
TAYLOR. VICTOR G JR 137. 

188. 189. 263 

Bradley Creek Point 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
TEAGUE. JOHN B 124. 272. 

287 

1651 Spring Dr 

Louisville. KY 40205 
TEER. DAVID ALLEN 117. 172 

3440 Rugby Rd. 

Durham. NC 27707 
TEER. ROBERT GLENN 117. 

172 

3440 Rugby Rd. 

Durham. NC 27707 
TENNIS 

Men's 188. 189 

Women's 190. 191 
TERRY. CONSTANCE C 104, 

287 

102 Matoaka Rd 

Richmond. VA 23226 
TERRY. LAURA HAMPTON 39 

102 Matoaka Rd 

Richmond. VA 23226 
TERRY. WILLIAM HOLT 4. 6. 7. 

44. 69. 74. 109. 113, 114. 

21G 
THAYER. JULIA ROSS 95, 114, 

221, 224. 233 

120 Rockview Lane 

Morganlon. NC 28655 
THIES. FRANK R III 124. 287. 

295 

334 Hempstead PI 

Charlotte. NC 28207 
THOMAS. DAVID BRIAN 226 

412 Wake Dr 

Salisbury. NC 28144 
THOMAS. ELIZABETH J 80. 

287. 294. 295 

510 Oliver St 

Cincinnati. OH 45215 
THOMAS. I JOB 54 
THOMAS. JONATHAN LEE 

617 Jetlerson Cir. 

Liberty. MO 64068 
THOMAS, LISA RENE 114. 221. 

233 

2233 Kimway Dr 

Matthews. NC 28105 
THOMAS, MARK P 132. 217, 

287 

1803 Griffith Rd 

Monroe. NC 28110 
THOMPSON. BUCK 68 
THOMPSON. DONNA GAIL 247 

P O Box 48 Rt 1 



. 

IH'iMPSON. JASON 
THOMPSON. MARY K I 1 75 

1622 Brandon Rd 

Ite, NC 28207 
THOMPSON. NANCY JANE 134. 

172, 249 

140 Boiling Spring Cir 

Southern Pines. NC 282 1 1 
THOMPSON. TRACY 

KATHLEEN 96, 263 

1636 Cavendish Cl 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
THOMSON. GREGORY SCOTT 

9. 124. 227 

1 141 1 Purple Beech 

Reston. VA 22091 
THOMSON. TODD STUART 9. 

206 

11411 Purple Beech 

Reston. VA 22091 
THORNBERRY. MARY 

CAROLINE 57 
THORNSBERRY. ROBERT M 

131. 177 

2690 Milwood Ct 

Decatur. GA 30033 
THORNTON. LOY ANN 35. 123. 

146. 159. 263 

311 16th Ave 

Ocoee. FL 32761 
THORPE. HELEN JUDITH 87. 
182. 265. 267 

Windsor Hall 

Reading Berkshire 

England 
TICHES. CHARLES ELIAS 101. 

230. 233 

Rt. 2 Unger Rd 

Smithsburg. MD 21783 
TIERNAN. CHRISTOPHER 127. 

194. 195. 262. 263. 267 

5300 Washington St 

Hollywood. FL 33021 
TILBURY. JEFFERY P 123. 124. 

249 

8327 Blossom Belle 

Missouri City. TX 77489 
TINSLEY. ELLIS ALLAN JR 

110. 127. 226. 296 

2202 S Live Oak Pkwy 

Wilmington. NC 28403 
TODD. NEVINS W III 127. 188. 

189. 287 

619 Ridge Rd 

Salisbury. MD 21801 
TODD. SARAH ELLEN 172. 287. 

294. 295 

207 Edgewood Rd 

Staunton. VA 24401 
TOLBERT. CARL ERNEST 177 

Rt 2 Box 824 

Lenoir. NC 28645 
TOLENTINO. LEANDRO M 69 
TOLER. ELIZABETH LYNN 113. 

263 

812 Woodsdale Rd 

Wilmington. DE 19809 
TOLER. JOHN WILLIAM 124. 

162. 226. 233 

812 Woodsdale Rd 

Wilmington. DE 19809 
TOPLAK. BOGDAN 

ALEXANDER 227 

C/O Sonja Glourma 

6809 Maylield 1450 

Mayfield Height, OH 44124 
TORRENCE. HARRY L JR 

206 Verde Viste Dr 

Thousand Oaks. CA 91360 
TORRENCE. MABLE 123 
TOSLOSKY. JOHN JOSEPH 85. 

123. 124 

124 S Hills Dr. 

Tower Lakes 

Barringlon. IL 60010 



Index /Advertisements 315 



TOUCHET. CAPTAIN NIEL 59 
TRACK TEAM 

Men's 193 

Women's 192 
TROBICH. ROBERT KEVIN 87, 

124, 287 

11620 Kelvin Ave. 

Philadelphia. PA 19116 
TROTTER. JAMES FORD 128. 

160, 172, 193 

1243 East Catalpa 

Springfield. MO 65804 
TROUTMAN. JAMES LESLIE 

123, 252, 287, 294, 295 

Bridgeboro Rd. 

Moorestown, NJ 08057 
TRUMBULL, EDWARD 68, 112 
TSANTES, NICHOLAS G. 206. 

263 

2008 Wood Hollow Cve. 

Virginia Bch., VA 23454 
TULLY. KATHERINE E 287 

6240 Green Meadows 

Memphis, TN 38138 
TULLY. MARK PRATT 249 

109 Via Havre 

Newport Bch., CA 92663 
TUNKEL. RONALD FRANCIS 38, 

39 

RFD 8 Box 26A 

Hendersonville, NC 28739 
TURK. ANNE ALLISON 84, 287 

2 Beaverbrook Rd. 

Asheville, NC 28804 
TURK, ROBERT DANIELL 

2 Beaverbrook Rd. 

Asheville. NC 28804 
TURLINGTON, WILLIAM TROY 

226, 233 

509 /b Boxwood Lane 

Goldsboro, NC 27530 
TURNBULL, GORDON A. 87, 

127, 142, 200, 230, 263, 294, 

295 

4519 Kingsway Dr. 

Mobile, AL 36608 
TURNBURKE, LAURA PELL 

114, 198, 221. 233 

265 Keller Rd. 

Berwyn, PA 19312 
TURNER, DAVID WESLEY 77, 

177. 230 

P.O. Box 10 

Goldston, NC 27252 
TYLER, JEFFERY ALAN 

1716 Stonecliff Ct. 

Decatur, GA 30033 



ULINE, BRADLEY RICHARD 

132, 249 

1496 Rosetree Ct. 

Clearwater, FL 33516 
UNDERWOOD. RUSSELL LEE 

4401 Shattalon Dr. 

Winston Salem, NC 27106 
UNION 140, 141, 142, 143 

V 

VAGT, GEORGEANN LOUISE 

150, 287 

311 Hillside Ave. 

Naugatuck, CT 06770 
VAILLANCOURT. GERRY E. 205 
VALBUENA. MARTIN ENRIQUE 

12, 230. 233 

2227 Overlook Dr. 

Mt. Dora, FL 32757 
VANCE, CHRISTINE W. 56 
VANCE. HAROLD PHILP 230 

5758 Indian Cir. 

Houston, TX 77057 
VAN DELL, JOHN THOMAS 

123. 124 

2716 Windover 

Corona Del Mar, CA 92625 
VANDENBOS, JILL 231. 233 



6237 S. Gallup 

Littleton, Co 80120 
VANDERPOOL, JULIE L. 123, 

132 

1925 Spalding Dr. 

Atlanta. GA 30338 
VAN DEVENTER, HENDRICK W. 

227, 233 

P.O Box 3605 

Meridian. MS 39301 
VAN HARE. MARY ELIZABETH 

221, 225 

38 Red Bird Rd. 

Stamford. Ct 06905 
VAN METRE. LAUREN LOUISE 

128, 249 

9006 Nomini Lane 

Alexandria, VA 22309 
VASS, KARL DOUGLAS JR 

117, 157, 159, 262 

429 Windemere Rd. 

Wilmington, NC 28405 
VENTURELLI, PETER JOSEPH 

56 
VERDI, JOHN NEVILLE 108, 124 

6400 Westland Road 

Bethesda, MD 20034 
VIEST, NICHOLAS D. 127 

215 E. 79th St. Apt. 8E 

New York. New York 10021 
VITELLI, ALESSANDRO 93, 117, 

266, 267 
VON HERRMANN, SUSAN G 

134, 287 

1804 Elkhart Dr. 

Greensboro, NC 27408 
VOORHIS, DANIEL THOMAS 

117. 193. 249 

54 Whitman Road 

Woods Hole. MA 02543 

W 

WADDELL. BRAD 138, 139, 

227, 233 

1 17 Forest Drive 

Bennettsville. SC 29512 
WADDILL. DAN WILSON 74, 

110, 127, 132, 162, 230, 262. 

294 

3385 Sledd Ct 

Winston Salem, NC 27106 
WADE, TERENCE ROBERT 132, 

287 

976 Campbellton Dr. 

N. Augusta. SC 29841 
WAGNER, VAN LEWIS 35 

1000 Devonwood 

Galion, OH 44833 
WAHL, WILLIAM B. JR 131. 

184, 240 

23 Forest Trail 

Basking Ridge, NJ 07920 
WALCOTT, JAMES DEXTER JR. 

41 Brookstone Drive 

Princeton. NJ 08540 
WALKER. JAMES IV 231, 233 

123 Duncansby Ct. 

Cary NC 27511 
WALKER, LEONARD JR. 177, 

263 

19539 E. Iowa Circle 

Aurora, CO 80013 
WALKER, THOMAS WORTH 

127, 162. 217, 249 

2938 Hermitage Dr. 

Montgomery, AL 36111 
WALL, JEFFREY JAMES 189, 

294 

41 10 Towanda Trail 

Knoxville. TN 37919 
WALLACE, BRUCE A. 118, 200, 

287 

319 Merion Ave 

Haddonfield. NJ 08033 
WALSH, JOHN DOUGLAS 233 

739 Bellemeade Drive 

Marietta, GA 30060 
WALTERS. SHANNON LEE 134, 

272. 287, 294 



4637 Princess Anne Ln. 

Jacksonville. FL 32210 
WALTON. GARY RICHARD 263 

867 Castle Falls Dr. 

Atlanta. GA 30329 
WAMPLER. NANCY W. 112. 

117. 162. 287, 295 

318 Walnut Dr. 

Nashville, TN 37205 
WAPLES, TIMOTHY FRANKLIN 

230, 234 

2708 Pencoyd Lane 

Charlotte, NC 28210 
WARD, PAUL KENNETH 146. 

160. 287 

206 Henry Clay Rd 

Ashland. VA 23005 
WARD. THOMAS MORGAN JR. 

234 

3417 Merrick Dr. 

Lexington, KY 40502 
WARNER, HALL EATING 

HOUSE 114, 115, 135 
WARNER, JOHN SLOAN JR. 83. 

128, 249 

4428 Sheppard Place 

Nashville. TN 37205 
WARNER, WILLIAM THOMAS 

177, 230 

11138 Green Lake Dr 

Apt 202 Bldg. 7 

Boynton Beach, FL 33435 
WARREN, RUSS C 2, 58 
WARRICK, JAY HENDERSON 

132, 287 

P.O. Box 594 

Monroe. NC 28110 
WASHAM. RACHEL 65 
WASHBURN, MICHAEL 

WARREN 206, 227. 233 

1515 Magnolia 

Wilmington, NC 28403 
WASHINGTON. WENDELL E. 

177 

P.O. Box 801 

Clanton. AL 35045 
WATERS, REBECCA ANNE 134, 

249 

305 Decatur Rd. 

Jacksonville. NC 28540 
WATERSKIING CLUB, 208 
WATSON, BRYNA ALWYN 287. 

295 

3083 Andrews Dr NW 

Atlanta, GA 30305 
WATSON. RICKY LEE 34. 35. 

120. 138. 287 

6411 Baux Mtn. Rd. 

Winston Salem, NC 27105 
WDAV 90, 91 
WEATHERSPOON, WILLIAM H 

139, 227, 234 

11808 Edgewater Ct. 

Raleigh. NC 27614 
WEBB, JEAN MARGARET 114, 

172, 192. 221. 234 

11428 Old Colony Pkw 

Knoxville, TN 37922 
WEBB, MATTHEW DEAN 141, 

226 

13220 Plesentview Ln. 

Greenbriar 

Fairfax, VA 22030 
WEBSTER. GEORGE D. Ill 118, 

180. 287 

5305 Cardinal Ct. 

Bethesda, MD 20086 
WEBSTER, MARCUS NASSIB 

137, 167, 287 
1816 Faculty Dr. 
Winston Salem, NC 27106 

WEISS, ERIC ANDREW 83, 120, 

138. 198. 295 
1819 Dormeone Rd. 

St. Petersburg. FL 33710 
WEISS. KIMBERLY ANN 128 

249. 263 

Route 4 Box 171 /D 

Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
WEITNAUER. DAVID DENK 131 



287 

1 Wimberly Court 

Decatur, GA 30030 
WEIZENBAUM, JOSEPH 88 
WELLBORN, MARSHALL J. Ill 

3101 Rochingham Dr NW 

Atlanta. GA 30327 
WELLER. JAMES WARD JR. 

230, 234 

2146 Roswell Ave. 

Charlotte, NC 28207 
WELLS, ANDREW HENDERSON 

128. 249 

447 Steeple Chase Ln. 

Bndgewater. NJ 08807 
WELSH, WILMER HAYDEN 57 
WELTY. KAREN ELIZABETH 94. 

95, 213, 287, 295 

225 26th Ave. N. 

St. Petersburg. FL 33704 
WEST, BRUCE STEWART 118, 

287 

117 Goodward Rd. 

Richmond, VA 23236 
WEST, DAVID ANDREW 123, 

124 

1208 Knobb Hill Dr. 

Jacksonville. FL 32205 
WEST. JONATHAN DROWE 

132. 286, 287 

815 Riverside Dr. 

Newport News, VA 23606 
WEST, MARGARET ELIZABETH 

263 

Box 313 

Marble, NC 28905 
WESTERHOUT, NELSON 

MOREL 177, 249 

662 Via Lido Beach Nord 

Newport Beach, CA 92663 
WESTMORELAND. DAVID T. 

4900 Pine Ridge Rd. 

Charlotte. NC 28211 
WHALEN. ROBERT EMMET JR. 

120, 138, 139, 179, 263 

3509 Westover Rd. 

Durham, NC 27707 
WHALEN, TIMOTHY J. 289 

504 Denington Ln. 

Severna Park, MD 21146 
WHELLER, SARA LYN 

1119 Sturbridge Rd. 

Fallston, MC 21047 
WHELAN. MARK RICHARD 124 

1225 Estoril Drive 

Jacksonville, FL 32216 
WHITAKER, WILLIAM A. 227, 

233. 248 

4860 Northside Dr. 

Atlanta, GA 30327 
WHITE, ALLAN STEPHEN 177 

206 Highland Cir. 

Boone, NC 28607 
WHITE. CLARA LEE 80, 114. 

234 

501 Circle Drive 

Alexander City. AL 35010 
WHITE, CRAIG JUSTICE 99, 

132. 289, 294, 295 

Rt. 4 Box 239 

Huntersville, NC 28078 
WHITE, ELIZABETH C. 132. 

230. 272, 289. 295 

607 Colonial Dr 

High Point, NC 27262 
WHITE, ELIZABETH DENNY 

114, 134, 221, 222, 234 

1515 Scotland Ave. 
Charlotte, NC 28207 
WHITE, LOCKE JR. 57 
WHITE, WILLIAM DALE 227. 
233 

607 Colonial Drive 
High Point. NC 27262 
WHITESIDES. EDWARD 

EDWARD W 132. 167. 249. 
263, 294, 295 
6371 Mulberry Lane 
Stockton, CA 95212 
WHITESIDES, LEE MCLEAN 



316 Index/Advertisements 



2650 Armstrong Cir 
Gaslonia. NC 2805? 
WHITIOCK. ELINOS A III 13. 
289 

Rl I Box 564 
Slanley. NC 28164 
WHITLOCK. PAMELA J 192 
217. 289 

7831 Elm Tree Road 
Chatlolle. NC 28212 
WHITMIRE. BRIAN 131 167 
176. 177. 289 
5077 Bradford Rd 
Jacksonville. RL 32217 
WICKER. STEWART 263 
5964 Jolfa Place 
Springfield. VA 22150 
WIE8USCH. TODD DENTON 
132. 179. 227. 233. 245 
405 Country Lane 
Louisville. KY 40207 
WILCOX. ADELAIDE L 171.286 
828 Kenmore Rd 
Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
WILEY. CHARLES ADEN III 249 
3409 Oberlm Dr 
Greensboro. NC 27405 
WILEY. DOUGLAS STEWART 
132. 167 

3818 N Woodrow St 
Arlington. VA 22207 
WILKINS. STEPHEN HOWELL 
249 

560 Grandview 
San Antonio. TX 78209 
WILKINSON. MIKHAEL B 234 
P.O. Box 4202 
Wilmington. NC 28046 
WILLIAMS. ANN ROBIN 289 
4408 Coral Point Dr 
Morehead City, NC 28557 
WILLIAMS. ATONDRA M 77. 
221. 233 
313 College Dr 
Launnburg. NC 28352 
WILLIAMS. BENJAMIN F JR 
137. 210, 249 
2521 Catherine Dr 
Burlington, NC 27215 
WILLIAMS. CRYSTAL FAITH 
123. 263 

5252 Open Window 
Columbia, MD 21044 
WILLIAMS. DEBRA JEAN 95 
117. 249 

2574 Woodwardia Rd 
Atlanta. GA 30345 
WILLIAMS. ELIZABETH E 134. 
263 

6407 Three Chopt Rd 
Richmond. VA 23226 
WILLIAMS. JAMES H JR 69 
WILLIAMS. KENDRICK D. 77. 
177. 263 
17 Durante PI 
Durham, NC 27704 
WILLIAMS. LAURA RUTH 221, 
233. 288 

5318 Robmhood Rd 
Charlotte. NC 28211 
WILLIAMS. RICHARD T 
309 Edgehill Rd 
Wayne. PA 19087 
WILLIAMS. RUSSELL TODD 127 
2241 Kimbrough Wds 
Germantown, TN 38138 
WILLIAMSON. JOHN H 26 58 
WILLINGHAM. EDWARD LEE III 

69 
WILLIS. EDWARD R II 177 
Route 2 Box 210-D 
Green Cove Sprg . FL 32043 
WILSON. ANDREW SCOTT 80 
249 

1 12 Pearson Dr 

Morganton. NC 28655 

WILSON. EUDELL 60 

WILSON. GRIER 60 

WILSON. KENNETH WAYNE 77 

Route 7 Box 306 



Fayetteville. NC 28306 
WILSON, RICHARD FENTON 
1906 Lamson PI 
Mclean, VA 22101 
WINDHAM. MARY Fl l/ABETH 
134. 289 
810 Emory Drive 
Chapel Hill. NC 27514 
WINKLER. JULIUS SHERMAN 

57 
WINSTON. ROBERT E L III 249 
6701 Virginia Circle 
Charlotte. NC 28214 
WINTERMUTE. ELIZABETH J 
221, 233 

1 103 N Duke Street 
Durham. NC 27701 
WITHROW. FRED DALE 95 
1 1 18. 263 

139 Westway Road T/3 
Greenbelt. MD 20770 
WOLF. ALBERT ALLEN 59 
WOLF. ALBERT ALLEN JR 95 
229 Pine Rd 
Davidson. NC 28036 
WOLF. RUTH SABINA 
604 65th St Court NW 
Bradenton. FL 33505 
WOMACK. JEANNE ENGLISH 
134. 170. 171. 263 
1205 Whitby Road 
Richmond. VA 23227 
WOOD. KENNETH H 32, 69 
WOODARD, JOSEPH C JR. 131 
6024 Woodcresi Dr 
Raleigh, NC 27603 
WOODMANSEE. JOHN 
RICHARD 184. 230 
2451 Weathertord Ct. 
Marietta. GA 30067 
WOODS. CHRISTOPHER C 128. 
249. 263 

200 Mile Common 
Fairfield. CT 06430 
WOODWARD. PAT MUNROE 
JR 132. 184. 249 
Route 2 Box 188 
Oumcy, FL 32351 
WOODY. TERESA 69. 70 
WOOTEN. EARL GLENDELL 
162. 249. 294 
Star Route Box 19 
Maysville. NC 28555 
WORTH. ALLEN FRAZIER 13. 
34. 35. 113. 117, 289 
P.O. Box 26 
Jefferson. NC 28640 
WRESTLING TEAM 194. 195 
WRIGHT. CHARLES 143 
WRIGHT. DWAYNE DOVELL 77, 
177. 230 

2916 E Wynnton Lane 
Columbus, GA 31906 
WRIGHT. DWAYNE EDWARD 
147 

2205 East Gwinnett 
Savannah, GA 31404 
WRIGHT, JAMES ATTMORE 
184, 234 

5505 SW 100th St 
Miami FL 33156 
WRIGHT, JEFFREY H 121. 206 
289 

Rt 2 Box 368B Hwy 150 
Greensboro. NC 27408 
WRIGHT. THEODORE MANNING 
206 

Route 2 Box 368B 
Greensboro. NC 27408 
WRUCK. ERICH-OSKAR 

JOACHIM SIEGFRIED 52. 59. 
268 
WRUCK. KRISTA ELISABETH 
263 

Pine Road 
Davidson. NC 28036 



Y STUDENT SERVICE CORPS 
80. 81 

Tl 11)1 MARTHA KRISTINA 221 

228 

2015 Glen Ross Road 

Silver Spring. MD 20910 
YODER. LAURFN W 15. 59 
YOUNG DEMOCRATS 78. 79 
YOUNG REPUBLICANS 78. 79 
YOUNG. JAMES VINCENT JR 

72. 120. 139. 263 

1822 Thornton 

APO 

Leavenworth. KS 66048 
YOUNG. LISA MARGUERITE 83. 

189. 263 

985 Winding Creek Tr 

Atlanta. GA 30328 
YU. CHIEN WEN 220. 230 

Davidson. NC 28036 



7EMP. FRANCIS L JR 132 

Route 3 

Camden. SC 29020 
ZIELINSKI. BRYAN C 122. 123. 

124, 172 

2831 NE 36th St. 

Ft Lauderdale, FL 33308 
7IMMERMANN. TC PRICE 5. 

22. 49. 69. 291. 293 
ZOUTEWELLE. ANDREW G 

127, 263 

2136 Malvern Rd. 

Charlotte. NC 28207 




1982 Quips And Cranks Staff 



Editor: Karen Welty 

Business Manager: Lori Boardman 

Copy Editors: Tracy Thompson, Jim Reese 

Photography: Jim Morgan 

Head Photographer: Lee McCormick 

Index Editors: Lori Boardman, Lisa Boardman 



Layout Staff: 
Carol Roche 
Andy Harrison 
Mike Allen 
Paul Coggins 
Kathy Gratto 
Martha Nelson 
Nancy Rosselot 
Cliff Savage 
Rick Horlbeck 
Kathleen Huff 



Business Staff: 
Rhett Brown 
Rob Spaugh 



Copy Staff: 
Kathy Gratto 
Ann Meador 
Carolina Boudreau 
Caroline Rumley 
Bert Wolf 
Sally Campbell 
Frances Palmer 
Mark Batten 



Photograph Staff: Elizabeth Smiley, Janet 
Lindsey, Mandy Barber, Anderson Scott, 
Randy Stroud, Bruce Wallace, Steve Stine, 
Meg Surratt, Mike Mell, John Breidenstine, 
Cindy Clark, Pat Donally, Paul Mainella, 
John Hendrix, Scott Otto. 



Caption Writing: 
Karen Welty 
Lori Boardman 
Lisa Boardman 
Cliff Savage 
Tracy Thompson 
Kathy Grotto 
Bert Wolf 



Sports Captioning: 
Kara Gilmore 
Steve Soud 
Mark Elmore 
Peter Burr 
Howard Browne 
Jeff Hamilton 
Todd Kimsey 



318 Credits/Colophon 



Story Credits: 


Page 4: 


Karen Welty 


Page 8: 


Ann Meador 


Page 10 


Caroline Boudreau, Karen 


Welty 




Page 12 


Tracy Thompson 


Page 16 


Mark Batten 


Page 22 


Lori Boardman 


Page 26 


Lori Boardman, Karen Welty 


Page 38 


Mike Allen 


Page 43 


Caroline Boudreau 


Page 44 


Kathy Gratto 


Page 52 


Jim Reese 


Page 56 


Ann Meador 


Page 63 


Sally Campbell 


Page 67 


Lisa Boardman 


Page 70 


Kathy Gratto 


Page 74 


Kathy Gratto 


Page 92 


Kathy Gratto, Lori Boardman 


Page 96 


Lori Boardman 



Page 98: Karen Welty 

Page 100: Lori Boardman 

Page 102: Tracy Thompson 

Page 105: Lori Boardman 

Page 107: Tracy Thompson 

Page 111: Lori Boardman 

Page 113: Carol Roche 

Page 142: Lisa Boardman 

Page 165: Lori Boardman 

Page 168: Bert Wolf 

Page 178: Lori Boardman 

Page 186: Frances Palmer 

Page 190: Karen Welty 

Page 210: Steve Soud, Karen Welty 

Page 216: Karen Welty 

Page 218: Carolina Rumley 

Page 226: Ann Meador 

Page 265: Veronique Raynal 

Page 291: Karen Welty 



Special Thanks To: 

Dr. Schuh and Dr. Burnett for putting up with the 

photography staff during deadlines. 

Bill Giduz and the Communications Office for letting 

us raid their files and reprinting photographs in 

times of duress. 

Lyman Collins for lending photos. 

The Davidsonian for lending us photos and 

providing information for numerous articles. 

Trey Thies for untold hours spent in the darkroom. 

Shaw Smith for helping me redecorate the office. 

Cathy Rich for darkroom work. 

The Carpenter Shop and Physical Plant for making 

the office bearable (especially for unsticking the 

windows). 

Mrs. Shelva Russ for making business transactions 

more than a pleasure. 

Colophon: The 1982 editor of Quips and Cranks was printed on 80 lb. 
glossy paper by Jostens/American Yearbook Company. All black and 
white and color photographs were printed by the staff in campus 
facilities. All type is set in Helvetica; body copy is 10 point, captions 10 
point italic with a 14 point bold italic kicker. The book was published 
on a budget of $19,000 allotted by the Activities Tax Council, 
supplemented by advertising. 



Credits/Colophon 319 



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